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Military briefs for April 25, 2012

Roper joins Navy through delayed entry

Posted: April 24, 2012 1:10 p.m.
Updated: April 25, 2012 5:00 a.m.

Civilian Iesha M. Roper, a 2009 graduate of North Central High School, recently enlisted in the U.S. Navy under the Delayed Entry Program at Navy Recruiting District, Raleigh, N.C.

The program allows recruits to enter the Navy and take up to one year to complete prior commitments such as high school. Using recruiters as mentors, this program helps recruits ease into the transition from civilian to military life.

Roper will report for active duty to undergo basic training at the Navy’s Recruit Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill.

*****

Army National Guard Pfc. Cameron McCowan has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson in Columbia.

During the nine weeks of training, McCowan studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fitness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches, and field training exercises.

McCowan is a 2011 graduate of Camden Military Academy.

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U.S. Marine Corps Pfc. Jedarius L. Hayes, son of Lizzie Hayes of Camden, recently completed 12 weeks of basic training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, designed to challenge new Marine recruits both physically and mentally.

Hayes and fellow recruits began their training at 5 a. m., by running three miles and performing calisthenics. In addition to the physical conditioning program, Hayes spent numerous hours in classroom and field assignments which included learning first aid, uniform regulations, combat water survival, marksmanship, hand-to-hand combat and assorted weapons training. They performed close order drill and operated as a small infantry unit during field training.

Hayes and other recruits also received instruction on the Marine Corps' core values--honor, courage and commitment, and what the core values mean in guiding personal and professional conduct.

Hayes and fellow recruits ended the training phase with The Crucible, a 54-hour, team evolution culminating in an emotional ceremony in which recruits are presented the Marine Corps Emblem, and addressed as “Marines” for the first time in their careers.

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