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Engrams joins Ravens' staff

Posted: February 14, 2014 9:18 a.m.
Updated: February 15, 2014 5:00 a.m.

After days of Internet speculation, the Baltimore Ravens officially announced former Camden High standout Bobby Engram as the team’s wide receivers coach on Tuesday.
Engram’s hiring completed Ravens’ head coach John Harbaugh’s staff for the 2014 NFL season.
The Ravens ranked 29th in the NFL in average yards per catch last year (10.8) and 25th in touchdown receptions (19). The receiving corps had 13 of those touchdowns.
“What an opportunity to join a team that has won, knows how to win and does all it can to make sure they continue to win,” Engram said. “I’m ready to be part of that and ready to work.”
Engram brings a blend of 14 years playing in the NFL and four years coaching with him to the 2012 Super Bowl champions.
“When you combine Bobby’s NFL pedigree as a player and his coaching experience, you see why we’re excited to add him to our staff,” Harbaugh said. “He comes highly recommended, he did an outstanding job at San Francisco and Pitt, and he’s an impressive person. He’ll help our receivers and our offense become better.”
This is Engram’s second job in the NFL and second working under a member of the Harbaugh family. In 2011, he was an offensive assistant coach on Jim Harbaugh’s staff with the San Francisco 49ers.
A 1991 graduate of Camden High School, Engram was a member of Billy Ammons’ 1990 AAA state championship team and was a 1990 Parade All-American and was the 1990 South Carolina Gatorade State Player of the Year. A three-sport athlete as a Bulldog, he was a an All-State selection in football, basketball and baseball.
Engram was an NFL receiver for 14 seasons, splitting his career between the Chicago Bears, Seattle Seahawks and Kansas City Chiefs.
He finished his pro career with 650 receptions for 7,751 yards and 35 touchdowns, including six catches for 70 yards in Super Bowl XL for the Seahawks in a loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers.
Before that, Engram was arguably the greatest receiver in Penn State history. He won the first-ever Biletnikoff Award as the nation's top receiver, and is still the Nittany Lions’ all-time leader in yards (3,026) and touchdowns (31).
After retiring in 2009, Engram quickly launched himself into coaching. He was an offensive assistant coach for the San Francisco 49ers, then the wide receivers coach at the University of Pittsburgh in 2012 and 2013.
In 2013, Engram guided a Pittsburgh’s receiving corps that was led by Tyler Boyd, who set school marks for receptions (85) and receiving yards (1,174) by a freshman. Both records were formerly held by current Arizona Cardinals standout Larry Fitzgerald.
In his first season with Pittsburgh (2012), Engram guided wide receivers Mike Shanahan (62 receptions for 983 yards) and Devin Street (73-975), who each garnered All-Big East honors in the same season, marking the first such occurrence in school history.
As an offensive assistant with the 49ers in 2011, Engram was part of a team that earned its first NFC West title in nine seasons and reached the NFC championship game.

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