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Stubborn and stupid

Many people believe what is necessary to gain a Ph.D. is superior intelligence. Such a belief is certainly a fallacy. What a person requires is two items: obstinacy and stupidity. As a person who has washed a rather large wooden house with a rag, water, and scouring powder; cut front and back yards, when yards really were yards, with a pair of scissors; and dressed a half a hog, chitterlings and all -- I know. These examples occurred in my youth, and, seemingly, I gathered only worn and blistered hands as my lessons. I did learn from an admonition from ...

February 15, 2012 | Jean Pruett C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Birth control redux

WASHINGTON -- Most Americans can hardly believe we're having a national debate about birth control in the 21st century -- more than 50 years after The Pill became available and decades after condoms became as commonplace as, well, balloons.

February 15, 2012 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Is America coming apart?

This may sound a little odd, but I believe that I need to pay more attention to white people.

February 13, 2012 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Mauling the military

"Freedom isn't free." We usually hear this on occasions such as Memorial Day and Veterans Day. It's meant to remind us of the brave American troops who put their lives on the line daily to protect our liberty and preserve our security.

February 13, 2012 | Ed Feulner The Heritage Foundation | Columns


When Cupid strikes…

Pick was the "church mother" of the First Baptist Church of Camden. Now for you uninformed folk, the church mother is the oldest female member of a congregation.

February 13, 2012 | Buster Beckham C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Shatter the black suicide myth

The death of Don Cornelius, creator and host of "Soul Train," brought two conflicting memories to mind: the weekly joy of that iconic program as a defining feature of black American pop culture and the terrible pain inflicted on the surviving family and friends of those who commit suicide.

February 10, 2012 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Keeping our children safe

One of the most memorable scenes from "The Oprah Winfrey Show" was an episode where Oprah sent a seemingly "nice" man who needed help finding his puppy to lure kids away from a playground where their parents were watching them.

February 10, 2012 | Miciah Bennett | Columns


Living in a crazy world

• We Americans have become the most sensitive, easily offended, quick-to-demand-an-apology, get-our-feelings-hurt, complainingest nation in the history of the world.

February 10, 2012 | Glenn Tucker C-I contributing editor | Columns


‘Poor’ miscues will give Obama edge in general election

When Mitt Romney said his now infamous words -- "I'm not concerned about the very poor" -- he was adding to an already disconcerting track record of tactlessness toward unemployed and lower income Americans.

February 08, 2012 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


Haw jelly

Combine juice from the May haw berry, from crabapples, along with some sugar and you have makings of the finest jelly ever to grace a biscuit or piece of toast. End of subject, you muse, but the paper's fresh, and you have a sweet tooth after downing a real Southern breakfast. "Hon, we got any haw jelly?" Now, unless you live in a kind of narrow swath of geography between Wedgefield and Camden, bordered south by the Wateree River swamp and north a tad on the Yankee side of old and new Highway 521, your answer is going to ...

February 08, 2012 | Johnny Roland C-I contributing columnist | Columns


The cost of conscience

WASHINGTON -- Two of the top news stories this past week have revolved around reproductive rights, though both raise far more troubling issues than a woman's right to contraception or abortion.

February 08, 2012 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Newt’s secret Alinsky love

Saul Alinsky is a name most people don't know, so why does Newt Gingrich drop his name at every opportunity without explaining who he is? Because it is not what the Republican presidential candidate says that counts; it is what his audiences feel when he says it.

February 06, 2012 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


An essential limp

WASHINGTON -- When a friend was writing a novel, he was concerned that his protagonist was too perfect.

February 06, 2012 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


The symbols in our city

Everyone knows what a red octagon with four white words in the middle held atop a pole stuck in the ground means. Stop, of course.

February 06, 2012 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Man vs. reality TV

I gave up television several years ago when I bid farewell to Jack Bauer and the final season of "24." Not sure why I was drawn to the series about a fictional counter terrorist unit and its main protagonist, Jack Bauer; perhaps it was the excitement of watching the unit diffuse major terrorist attacks in merely one hour of real time in one very bad day. Other than sports, worthwhile news and the occasional "Office" episode, I've chosen to put the box on the back burner.

February 03, 2012 | Paula Joseph C-I contributing columnist | Columns


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Articles by Section - Columns


Cahn: What the All-County students said

Several times during the nearly 15 years I've spent here at the Chronicle-Independent, I've had the privilege of covering the Upchurch & Jowers All-County Academic Team banquet, as I did a week ago tonight. As I continue to work on the education beat I took over a few months ago, I'm sure I'll attend many more of these special events in the years to come.

April 27, 2015 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Rich: The fire

We stood in the charred remains of a life that once was -- my sister and I -- and said not a word. What was there to say? Finally, I spoke.

April 27, 2015 | By Ronda Rich www.rondarich.com | Columns


Tucker: A long, proud history of incompetence

After I wrote a column last week detailing my secret dream of becoming a symphony conductor, my friend Waylon Fortenberry of Chesterfield County called me.

April 24, 2015 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Parker: Mr. Hughes goes to Washington

WASHINGTON -- When postal worker Doug Hughes -- otherwise known as the gyrocopter dude -- landed his gizmo on the West Lawn of the Capitol, he wasn't worried about being shot down, he says.

April 24, 2015 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writer's Group | Columns


Phillips: The entitled generation

In what could be considered an extension of my column from last week, which was about the misuse and abuse of government programs such as "food stamps," EBT cards and welfare, I've been giving the matter a lot of thought on a broader scale.

April 24, 2015 | Gary Phillips | Columns


Noble: Business leaders in ‘small town’ S.C.

It is often said South Carolina is a big small town where everyone knows everyone else. And if we don't know someone personally, then it's usually "I know who they are."

April 24, 2015 | By Phil Noble C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Parker: 2016 -- The woman trap

WASHINGTON -- Here we go. If you're a woman who might prefer someone other than Hillary Clinton as the next president of the United States, you're a self-loathing, anti-woman traitor.

April 22, 2015 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writer's Group | Columns


Tatum: No one seems to be discussing this

By now, everyone has weighed in on the various police transgressions all over the country.

April 22, 2015 | Jim Tatum | Columns


Jenkins: Nature is all you need

Much has been made in the last few years about the disconnect between children and nature. Richard Louv popularized the issue in his best-selling book, Last Child in the Woods. While the trend isn't necessarily intentional, it cannot be ignored either. The awareness we are attached to something more is a key component to our continued existence upon Earth. Fortunately, I think the roots of this respect are already planted in the passions of the most perfect people, our children.

April 22, 2015 | By Austin Jenkins C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Cahn: Some Americans can’t vote for president

Who would have thought a goofy looking guy with bad teeth from Britain named John Oliver could make us laugh so hard about the insanity of American government excesses, healthcare bureaucracy and even something as seemingly boring as net neutrality?

April 20, 2015 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Rich: The chainsaw assault

To be honest, I was more than a mite worried. I was plenty worried. My husband, raised not in the South or in the country, wanted a chainsaw. The one farm accessory which has brought down many a man. From an early age, I was taught respect for that chewing, sawing, respect-for-no-man power tool.

April 20, 2015 | By Ronda Rich www.rondarich.com | Columns


Morgan: Challenges

I was extremely pleased earlier this year to be invited with school board Chairman Ron Blackmon to participate in the Kershaw County Council planning retreat. It was a very informative experience for both of us. At the retreat, I was asked to outline what I see as the school district's most critical challenges. I've since been asked by several other groups to do the same presentation, so I thought what I had to say might be of interest.

April 20, 2015 | By Frank Morgan, KCSD Superintendent C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Tucker: My dream job? Smphony conductor

If you could have any job in the world, what would it be?

April 17, 2015 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Parker: Ring in the olde?

WASHINGTON -- Americans, perhaps more than anyone, worship the future and resent the past.

April 17, 2015 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writer's Group | Columns


Phillips: For those who truly need it

I read with great interest last week news reports about a lawmaker in Missouri proposing tighter restrictions on what food products would be allowed to be purchased using an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card. The EBT card is the modern-day equivalent of what is commonly called "food stamps," and is a government-provided program for people of lower income to acquire food. EBT cards have a benefit amount credited to them each month and at the store function the same as a debit or credit card.

April 17, 2015 | Gary Phillips | Columns


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