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Don't speak, write

My voice bothers me. Hearing my intonation on an answering machine or a message makes me wince. But there's not really a thing I can do to change this, is there? Sure, I often enjoy cigars, and think perhaps this will give my pipes a deeper, raspier tone, but I don't honestly trust it'll Barry White my inflection.

January 05, 2011 | Trevor Baratko | Columns


Sometimes, crime makes you laugh

About this time last year, I started a new tradition: looking back at the year in crime -- but from a funny point of view.

January 03, 2011 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


A stutter unfit for a king

At last, somebody has made an epic, triumphant movie about a hero with which I am personally familiar: a recovering stutterer.

January 03, 2011 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Touches of history and 'Heaven'

On a recent November morning after the General Election, I set out from my home in Columbia to go to my 64th high school reunion. All graduation classes from Midway High School have been meeting together annually for several years. This year the reunion was being held in a church at Shepard.

January 03, 2011 | Kershaw County Historical Society | Columns


Uncle Sam will help you buy an alpaca

I often bash government. I say it can't do anything better than people in a free market.

January 03, 2011 | John Stossel Creators.com | Columns


Cash life experiences into maturity

Apparently, there is not much of a correlation between a person's age and level of maturity.

December 31, 2010 | Ashley Ford | Columns


Tips, tricks and news

As 2010 turns to dust, a smattering of things I found in my mailbox:

December 31, 2010 | Glenn Tucker C-I contributing editor | Columns


Barbour apologizes, but does he mean it?

Today's lesson in revisionist American history is brought to you by Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour.

December 31, 2010 | Mary Sanchez Kansas City Star | Columns


Some facets of my 2010

2010 was a grand year in my eyes. Another one down, and with it, the knowledge and wisdom 365 days brings. Over the past year, in my sphere, there were certain news, entertainment and sports items I simply couldn't elude --

December 29, 2010 | Trevor Baratko | Columns


For Biden, mission accomplished

WASHINGTON -- The vice president calls, more than an hour after the appointed time but with an impeccable excuse: He was presiding over the Senate's vote to ratify the New START treaty.

December 29, 2010 | Ruth Marcus Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Rho Chi Kobraz my Group of the Year

Kaptin, Siren, Kare Bear, Venom and Professor. They sound like superhero names. And they are certainly heroes in my book.

December 27, 2010 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


'Alcopops' a high-risk potion

As we continue to celebrate the holidays and ring in the New Year this weekend, it is important to be sensible about our merry-making. In addition to the well-known dangers, there is a new one -- alcoholic energy drinks, otherwise known as "alcopops." These drinks have recently gained national attention after a rash of student hospitalizations in other states.

December 27, 2010 | S.C. Rep. Laurie Slade Funderburk C-I contributing columnist | Columns


The public sector and my grandchildren

Jack is 6 1/2, and Frances Anne just turned 4. I will not burden you with tiresome anecdotes about how funny, quick and special they are. Just take my word for it: They are.

December 27, 2010 | Mark Shields Creators.com | Columns


Dear Mr. Mulvaney...

Dec. 24, 2010

December 24, 2010 | Glenn Tucker C-I contributing editor | Columns


Boehner's curious tears

History may well remember this political year for feminine jeers and manly tears.

December 24, 2010 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


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Articles by Section - Columns


Got Putin, yet?

WASHINGTON -- The new "agreement" between Russia, the U.S. and our allies is exactly what the former KGB agent ordered.

April 23, 2014 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Just keep walking

Sylvia Plath said, in her autobiographical novel The Bell Jar, "There must be quite a few things a hot bath won't cure, but I don't know many of them." While I do fully agree with the literary force of genius that is Plath, if that had been my statement, I would have written it: "There must be quite a few things a hot bath or a long walk won't cure, but I don't know many of them."

April 23, 2014 | Haley Atkinson | Columns


Giving Back

Recently, I was listening to a talk radio host railing about how public schools "no longer teach values." This issue seems to be a mantra of sorts for some folks in the media, many of whom I suspect haven't been anywhere near a public school in years. As someone who is in public schools every day, I can't for the life of me figure out what this view is based on. I know it's not based on reality.

April 21, 2014 | | Columns


Easter Memories and Hope

It is each of the many Easters of my life that I remember more clearly than any other holiday. Christmases blur together with only a few standing out in my memory such as the one when it snowed all day, the year I lost my voice completely, and the two times that I wasn't home – one working in Washington, D.C. and another in London.

April 21, 2014 | Rhonda Rich | Columns


Noted and passed - April 21, 2014

** Thomas Ravenel, the former state treasurer who served prison time for cocaine distribution, now stars in a reality television show called "Southern Charm." Ravenel stumbles through the show in a haze of alcohol and bad judgment. He and his girlfriend, who's 30 years his junior, recently had a baby in Florida. Ravenel says he intends to revive his political career by running for the U. S. Senate from the Palmetto State. The guys in Vegas would probably lay some long odds on his chances for success.

April 21, 2014 | | Columns


Outrageous

You know what the most commonly used word in the English language seems to be?

April 18, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


“Robert Mills: Designs for Democracy”

Robert Mills was the first American born and trained architect. He called himself "Robert Mills, Architect of Public Buildings." Indeed, Mills established a new scale and standard for public buildings in Washington, D. C. when he designed the Treasury Building, the Patent Office, and the General Post Office in the 1830s and early 1840s. In other parts of the country, Mills designed buildings that were sensitive to regional values and local architectural traditions. Always his attention was on permanency and fireproofing for his public buildings.

April 18, 2014 | Katherine Richardson | Columns


I don’t ride anything that can make its own decisions

Camden is, without a doubt, a horse town. Kershaw County is a horse county and the love for horses extends throughout this great area of South Carolina. However, it stops at my door.

April 18, 2014 | Gary Phillips | Columns


My preperation for Easter

Easter is a holiday of two extremes. On one side is a covert celebration of springtime with cute bunnies and pretty dresses and Easter egg hunts and chicks and flowers and lambs. On the other is a lamb being slaughtered on Passover. There is a bloodstained cross on which a Jewish man is dying who proclaimed that he was the Son of God, and that he had to be killed so that God's wrath against my sins could be carried out not against me but against him.

April 18, 2014 | Tenell Felder | Columns


Erasing the race card

WASHINGTON -- One approaches the race fray with trepidation, but here we go, tippy-toe.

April 18, 2014 | Kathleen Parker | Columns


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