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A dog's life, then and now

I used to see those people who catered shamelessly to their dogs and snidely chuckle into my sleeve.

December 15, 2010 | Jim Tatum C-I guest columnist | Columns


TSA and security: the naked truth

Years ago, the biggest question you'd get while flying was "Coffee or tea?" Now it's "Naked body scan or aggressive pat-down?"

December 13, 2010 | Ed Feulner The Heritage Foundation | Columns


That's 'techie' entertainment!

With my busy schedule here at the C-I and being a dad to two rambunctious boys, it's sometimes hard to watch what I want when I want.

December 13, 2010 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


When will Obama go 'gangster'?

Leave it to the famously politically incorrect Bill Maher to get to the heart of what's bugging President Barack Obama's supporters these days:

December 13, 2010 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Turkey Bowl

The game was a beat-down of epic proportions. It was actually close at the beginning, both teams knotted at a touchdown, but the wheels of my team soon began to lose their grip from the proverbial axle. I would not say that the wheels "fell off" necessarily. This would imply that they simply came loose and rested in place. They actually flew off at quite an alarming rate and at last sight were still making their way down the street, women and children scattering in their wake.

December 13, 2010 | Dwight deLoach C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Don't dumb down ... just grow up

Sometimes, it just pays to be dumb.

December 10, 2010 | Ashley Ford | Columns


How WikiLeaks can make us less free

It is symbolically appropriate that among other charges in Sweden WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is accused of having unprotected sex with two women in Stockholm. I don't know whether the world-famous Internet whistleblower is guilty or not, but the allegation certainly fits his reputation for world-class recklessness.

December 10, 2010 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Ringing in the season

Ray Hazelwood still recalls the day in 1973 when his cherished class ring from The Citadel vanished.

December 10, 2010 | Glenn Tucker C-I contributing editor | Columns


America's reality show: gloom and doom

NEW YORK -- Pending catastrophe is not an easy notion to entertain, much less sustain. Americans moreover have a low tolerance for doom and gloom. We are the nation of optimism, after all. We elect leaders who promise hope and change. We are the shining city on a hill.

December 08, 2010 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Hitchens confronts the Big C

Journalists and writers serve numerous purposes in society, one of which is to stimulate thought and make you reconsider some, or all, of your beliefs. A simple way to do this is by providing all sides of an issue, regardless of whether one side is vastly more popular or accepted as true.

December 08, 2010 | Trevor Baratko | Columns


A time to govern

WASHINGTON -- New Hampshire Republican Judd Gregg could reel off a list of problems with the debt-reduction blueprint produced by the president's fiscal responsibility commission -- beginning with the fact that, as Gregg sees it, the plan doesn't do nearly enough to reduce the debt: By 2020, in the unlikely event that all the recommendations are enacted, the debt would still stand at an unhealthy share of gross domestic product, between 60 percent and 70 percent.

December 08, 2010 | Ruth Marcus Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


So, let this be a toothy lesson to you

It was my own fault.

December 06, 2010 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Security theater vs. real dangers

Great quotations aren't what they used to be. History is marked by signature lines like "We shall overcome" and "Give me liberty or give me death." To those, the age of YouTube adds, "If you touch my junk, I'll have you arrested."

December 06, 2010 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Demise of the service station

If you're planning a road trip to New Jersey or Oregon, forget about stopping for a quick self-service gasoline stop. It's not legal there.

December 03, 2010 | Glenn Tucker C-I contributing editor | Columns


Path of least resistance

This past August, I embarked on a journey encompassing 140 miles in 13 days all on foot. Yes, on foot. There were not many close to me that could appreciate my aspirations for chasing this "outward boundish" type charge, and rightfully so. There were hurdles to get over before ever reporting for my chosen wilderness course. There was the burden of leaving my family for 16 days which would prove to be an emotional feat like no other and a herculean effort logistically as well. Then there was the question of whether or not I would be physically and mentally ...

December 03, 2010 | Paula Joseph C-I guest columnist | Columns


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Articles by Section - Columns


Got Putin, yet?

WASHINGTON -- The new "agreement" between Russia, the U.S. and our allies is exactly what the former KGB agent ordered.

April 23, 2014 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Just keep walking

Sylvia Plath said, in her autobiographical novel The Bell Jar, "There must be quite a few things a hot bath won't cure, but I don't know many of them." While I do fully agree with the literary force of genius that is Plath, if that had been my statement, I would have written it: "There must be quite a few things a hot bath or a long walk won't cure, but I don't know many of them."

April 23, 2014 | Haley Atkinson | Columns


Giving Back

Recently, I was listening to a talk radio host railing about how public schools "no longer teach values." This issue seems to be a mantra of sorts for some folks in the media, many of whom I suspect haven't been anywhere near a public school in years. As someone who is in public schools every day, I can't for the life of me figure out what this view is based on. I know it's not based on reality.

April 21, 2014 | | Columns


Easter Memories and Hope

It is each of the many Easters of my life that I remember more clearly than any other holiday. Christmases blur together with only a few standing out in my memory such as the one when it snowed all day, the year I lost my voice completely, and the two times that I wasn't home – one working in Washington, D.C. and another in London.

April 21, 2014 | Rhonda Rich | Columns


Noted and passed - April 21, 2014

** Thomas Ravenel, the former state treasurer who served prison time for cocaine distribution, now stars in a reality television show called "Southern Charm." Ravenel stumbles through the show in a haze of alcohol and bad judgment. He and his girlfriend, who's 30 years his junior, recently had a baby in Florida. Ravenel says he intends to revive his political career by running for the U. S. Senate from the Palmetto State. The guys in Vegas would probably lay some long odds on his chances for success.

April 21, 2014 | | Columns


Outrageous

You know what the most commonly used word in the English language seems to be?

April 18, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


“Robert Mills: Designs for Democracy”

Robert Mills was the first American born and trained architect. He called himself "Robert Mills, Architect of Public Buildings." Indeed, Mills established a new scale and standard for public buildings in Washington, D. C. when he designed the Treasury Building, the Patent Office, and the General Post Office in the 1830s and early 1840s. In other parts of the country, Mills designed buildings that were sensitive to regional values and local architectural traditions. Always his attention was on permanency and fireproofing for his public buildings.

April 18, 2014 | Katherine Richardson | Columns


I don’t ride anything that can make its own decisions

Camden is, without a doubt, a horse town. Kershaw County is a horse county and the love for horses extends throughout this great area of South Carolina. However, it stops at my door.

April 18, 2014 | Gary Phillips | Columns


My preperation for Easter

Easter is a holiday of two extremes. On one side is a covert celebration of springtime with cute bunnies and pretty dresses and Easter egg hunts and chicks and flowers and lambs. On the other is a lamb being slaughtered on Passover. There is a bloodstained cross on which a Jewish man is dying who proclaimed that he was the Son of God, and that he had to be killed so that God's wrath against my sins could be carried out not against me but against him.

April 18, 2014 | Tenell Felder | Columns


Erasing the race card

WASHINGTON -- One approaches the race fray with trepidation, but here we go, tippy-toe.

April 18, 2014 | Kathleen Parker | Columns


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