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Michelle Obama’s wings

WASHINGTON -- If second-term presidents feel liberated by re-election to pursue bolder agendas, first ladies often become more comfortable to be their own person.

March 04, 2013 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Thin mints are the greatest invention

Just a couple days ago I was discussing the greatest inventions of mankind with my lunch bunch.

March 01, 2013 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Signs that the NRA is losing

Now that they're facing Washington's first serious push for new gun violence prevention laws since the Columbine massacre, gun lobbyists are grasping at straws -- as in "straw" purchases.

March 01, 2013 | By Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Hold them close, then let them go

It's funny how parenting works. At times, I am wonderfully amazed at the position; in other moments, I am utterly confused by the entire ride as if I were falling down the rabbit hole. I believe it fair to say, even with all the preparations we think we've made, no one is ever ready. We are always caught off guard when parenthood chooses us. When the "smoke clears," we realize that, of all the balls ever thrown our way, this is the one we cannot drop. Having kids -- the charge of rearing good, ethical, responsible human beings -- is ...

March 01, 2013 | By Paula Joseph C-I contributing columnist | Columns


The world of Co-ops

Last weekend I attended a cooperative (co-op) development workshop sponsored by the National Cooperative Business Association (NCBA) I was invited to.

March 01, 2013 | Miciah Bennett | Columns


Two little red balls

My mother certainly was horrified that I seemed to enjoy learning, often telling me, "Boys do not like smart girls." Her idea of a good life for me was to find some man to take care of me, know all home skills such as cooking, sewing, etc., and fill the house with children. Today, because of her, I know those skills and enjoy them. I did however, only have one child because of unforeseen circumstances. Knitting, crocheting, needlepoint, crewel, and regular sewing often occupy my time. In fact, one of my grandchildren recently asked me, "Nana, do you still like ...

February 27, 2013 | By Jean Pruett C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Droning on about feelings

WASHINGTON -- First they came for the drones.

February 27, 2013 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


A fond farewell

One of my first tastes of a slice of life in Camden came nearly two years ago after cruising down the Wateree River with a couple of pirates.

February 27, 2013 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


Cupcakes

Being reared by a mother who was a wonderful cook, I rarely had the chance to do so, Mother's idea being for me to watch her do it. As most teenagers, I had little time for this inactive pursuit. Finally, Mother allowed me the honor of preparing a cake with her being the watcher. Since the cake to be baked was a pound cake, I thought this was a one-step procedure requiring little effort. How wrong I was! Mother had no mix master or electric appliance; the cook beat and beat and beat by hand. I had a much ...

February 25, 2013 | By Jean Pruett C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Time for a RINO Rebellion?

WASHINGTON -- RINO-hunting, the long popular political sport that morphed in 2008 into a sort of hysteria-driven obsession, lately has become a suicide mission.

February 25, 2013 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


It’s Citizens United all over again

Last July, I wrote about how disheartened I was that the Supreme Court of the United States refused, on a 5-4 partisan vote, to reconsider one of its worst decisions ever: Citizens United. The original 2010 ruling opened the door for "super" political action committees (Super PACs) to accept unlimited contributions and, in at least some cases, without full disclosure on where that money's coming from.

February 25, 2013 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


A Civil War history lesson

On the slope of Malvern Hill is where John Young saved Henry Truesdale's life. Jim Sheorn and W.S. Kirby were on each side of Young.

February 25, 2013 | By Buster Beckham C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Being a preacher isn't easy

Many years ago, when I was a fresh-faced, full-of-spit-and-vinegar young reporter, I wrote a story indicating that a local church had hired a new minister.

February 22, 2013 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Boys in the back of the class

Every year, millions of well-intentioned American kids show up at kindergarten or first grade woefully unprepared to learn. Some can't even tell you their own complete name, let alone spell any of it.

February 22, 2013 | By Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Tree Pruning 101 -- Part 2

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) for Tree Care Operations for Pruning states "The purpose of utility pruning is to prevent the loss of service, comply with mandated clearance laws, prevent damage to equipment, avoid access impairment and uphold the intended usage of the utility space." When I worked for the S.C. Forestry Commission, I quoted this statement many times at community forums in places such as Elloree, Charleston, Walterboro and Beaufort. These events were always in response to a utility provider coming into town, unannounced, and "doing their thing." While the majority of cuts were technically correct, their ...

February 22, 2013 | By Camden Urban Forester Liz Gilland C-I contributing columnist | Columns


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Articles by Section - Columns


Cahn: What the All-County students said

Several times during the nearly 15 years I've spent here at the Chronicle-Independent, I've had the privilege of covering the Upchurch & Jowers All-County Academic Team banquet, as I did a week ago tonight. As I continue to work on the education beat I took over a few months ago, I'm sure I'll attend many more of these special events in the years to come.

April 27, 2015 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Rich: The fire

We stood in the charred remains of a life that once was -- my sister and I -- and said not a word. What was there to say? Finally, I spoke.

April 27, 2015 | By Ronda Rich www.rondarich.com | Columns


Tucker: A long, proud history of incompetence

After I wrote a column last week detailing my secret dream of becoming a symphony conductor, my friend Waylon Fortenberry of Chesterfield County called me.

April 24, 2015 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Parker: Mr. Hughes goes to Washington

WASHINGTON -- When postal worker Doug Hughes -- otherwise known as the gyrocopter dude -- landed his gizmo on the West Lawn of the Capitol, he wasn't worried about being shot down, he says.

April 24, 2015 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writer's Group | Columns


Phillips: The entitled generation

In what could be considered an extension of my column from last week, which was about the misuse and abuse of government programs such as "food stamps," EBT cards and welfare, I've been giving the matter a lot of thought on a broader scale.

April 24, 2015 | Gary Phillips | Columns


Noble: Business leaders in ‘small town’ S.C.

It is often said South Carolina is a big small town where everyone knows everyone else. And if we don't know someone personally, then it's usually "I know who they are."

April 24, 2015 | By Phil Noble C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Parker: 2016 -- The woman trap

WASHINGTON -- Here we go. If you're a woman who might prefer someone other than Hillary Clinton as the next president of the United States, you're a self-loathing, anti-woman traitor.

April 22, 2015 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writer's Group | Columns


Tatum: No one seems to be discussing this

By now, everyone has weighed in on the various police transgressions all over the country.

April 22, 2015 | Jim Tatum | Columns


Jenkins: Nature is all you need

Much has been made in the last few years about the disconnect between children and nature. Richard Louv popularized the issue in his best-selling book, Last Child in the Woods. While the trend isn't necessarily intentional, it cannot be ignored either. The awareness we are attached to something more is a key component to our continued existence upon Earth. Fortunately, I think the roots of this respect are already planted in the passions of the most perfect people, our children.

April 22, 2015 | By Austin Jenkins C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Cahn: Some Americans can’t vote for president

Who would have thought a goofy looking guy with bad teeth from Britain named John Oliver could make us laugh so hard about the insanity of American government excesses, healthcare bureaucracy and even something as seemingly boring as net neutrality?

April 20, 2015 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Rich: The chainsaw assault

To be honest, I was more than a mite worried. I was plenty worried. My husband, raised not in the South or in the country, wanted a chainsaw. The one farm accessory which has brought down many a man. From an early age, I was taught respect for that chewing, sawing, respect-for-no-man power tool.

April 20, 2015 | By Ronda Rich www.rondarich.com | Columns


Morgan: Challenges

I was extremely pleased earlier this year to be invited with school board Chairman Ron Blackmon to participate in the Kershaw County Council planning retreat. It was a very informative experience for both of us. At the retreat, I was asked to outline what I see as the school district's most critical challenges. I've since been asked by several other groups to do the same presentation, so I thought what I had to say might be of interest.

April 20, 2015 | By Frank Morgan, KCSD Superintendent C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Tucker: My dream job? Smphony conductor

If you could have any job in the world, what would it be?

April 17, 2015 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Parker: Ring in the olde?

WASHINGTON -- Americans, perhaps more than anyone, worship the future and resent the past.

April 17, 2015 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writer's Group | Columns


Phillips: For those who truly need it

I read with great interest last week news reports about a lawmaker in Missouri proposing tighter restrictions on what food products would be allowed to be purchased using an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card. The EBT card is the modern-day equivalent of what is commonly called "food stamps," and is a government-provided program for people of lower income to acquire food. EBT cards have a benefit amount credited to them each month and at the store function the same as a debit or credit card.

April 17, 2015 | Gary Phillips | Columns


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