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The Tea Fragger Party

Fragging: "To intentionally kill or wound (one's superior officer, etc.), esp. with a hand grenade."

August 03, 2011 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Breivik's real enemy: himself

Anders Breivik, the far-far-right-wing monster charged in Norway with the biggest mass murder by a single gunman in modern memory, reminds me of how often delusional minds hate others for what they really see in themselves.

August 01, 2011 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


I'll take the middle road, thanks

Perhaps the best commentary I've read on the debt crisis came from Lou Zickar on CNN.com. Zickar wrote the commentary as the editor of The Ripon Forum, "a centrist Republican journal of political thought and opinion published by The Ripon Society."

August 01, 2011 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Why they teach

I enjoy summer as much as anyone. By about mid-July, though, I am very ready for the new school year to begin. There are probably a fair number of parents who feel the same way, but maybe for somewhat different reasons. The feeling of renewal that a new school year brings is always exciting.

August 01, 2011 | KCSD Superintendent Dr. Frank Morgan C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Missing Amy Winehouse

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a serious Amy Winehouse fan.

July 29, 2011 | Ashley Ford | Columns


Rec facility an opportunity to expand sports tourism

In Camden, we are known for our rich history, our generous hospitality and our renowned horse culture.

July 29, 2011 | Camden Mayor Jeffrey Graham C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Juan Williams' payback time

Revenge is a dish that is best served cold, as an old saying goes. Juan Williams, the Fox News analyst who was famously fired last fall from NPR, serves up a generous platter of the cold dish in his latest book, if only as an appetizer.

July 29, 2011 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Not tonight, dear

WASHINGTON -- If only the migraine problem had been Mitt's. Or Newt's. Or any man's rather than a woman's.

July 27, 2011 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Ard's ethics violations put spotlight on office

Ken Ard has turned his job as lieutenant governor from one of virtual irrelevancy to one shrouded in controversy and scrutiny after racking up thousands of dollars in ethics violations since being sworn in six months ago.

July 27, 2011 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


Time to reform pension system

While it doesn't often make headlines, funding the State Retirement System is among the most important challenges facing state government.

July 25, 2011 | Richard Eckstrom S.C. comptroller general | Columns


Are the good guys finally winning?

So I read where a restaurant near Pittsburgh is finally implementing a policy I'd like to see everywhere: as of Friday, no children younger than 6 will be welcome there.

July 25, 2011 | Jim Tatum C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Bachmann's 'submerged' benefits

She's a famous foe of "big government" in her presidential campaign. Yet Rep. Michele Bachmann says it is no big deal that her family is reported to have received several hundred thousand dollars in government benefits. We'll let the voters decide how big of a deal they think it is.

July 25, 2011 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Honor Caylee by helping children here today

Is she in Ohio? Is she in Puerto Rico?

July 22, 2011 | Ashley Ford | Columns


Good to the last clam

On the coast of Maine, a couple of hours down from Acadia National Park, there's a village with the wonderfully euphonious name of Wiscasset, and on its outskirts sits the Sea Basket.

July 22, 2011 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Fannie and Freddie: bad tenants

Want to improve the housing market? Evict Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

July 22, 2011 | Ed Feulner The Heritage Foundation | Columns


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Articles by Section - Columns


Got Putin, yet?

WASHINGTON -- The new "agreement" between Russia, the U.S. and our allies is exactly what the former KGB agent ordered.

April 23, 2014 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Just keep walking

Sylvia Plath said, in her autobiographical novel The Bell Jar, "There must be quite a few things a hot bath won't cure, but I don't know many of them." While I do fully agree with the literary force of genius that is Plath, if that had been my statement, I would have written it: "There must be quite a few things a hot bath or a long walk won't cure, but I don't know many of them."

April 23, 2014 | Haley Atkinson | Columns


Giving Back

Recently, I was listening to a talk radio host railing about how public schools "no longer teach values." This issue seems to be a mantra of sorts for some folks in the media, many of whom I suspect haven't been anywhere near a public school in years. As someone who is in public schools every day, I can't for the life of me figure out what this view is based on. I know it's not based on reality.

April 21, 2014 | | Columns


Easter Memories and Hope

It is each of the many Easters of my life that I remember more clearly than any other holiday. Christmases blur together with only a few standing out in my memory such as the one when it snowed all day, the year I lost my voice completely, and the two times that I wasn't home – one working in Washington, D.C. and another in London.

April 21, 2014 | Rhonda Rich | Columns


Noted and passed - April 21, 2014

** Thomas Ravenel, the former state treasurer who served prison time for cocaine distribution, now stars in a reality television show called "Southern Charm." Ravenel stumbles through the show in a haze of alcohol and bad judgment. He and his girlfriend, who's 30 years his junior, recently had a baby in Florida. Ravenel says he intends to revive his political career by running for the U. S. Senate from the Palmetto State. The guys in Vegas would probably lay some long odds on his chances for success.

April 21, 2014 | | Columns


Outrageous

You know what the most commonly used word in the English language seems to be?

April 18, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


“Robert Mills: Designs for Democracy”

Robert Mills was the first American born and trained architect. He called himself "Robert Mills, Architect of Public Buildings." Indeed, Mills established a new scale and standard for public buildings in Washington, D. C. when he designed the Treasury Building, the Patent Office, and the General Post Office in the 1830s and early 1840s. In other parts of the country, Mills designed buildings that were sensitive to regional values and local architectural traditions. Always his attention was on permanency and fireproofing for his public buildings.

April 18, 2014 | Katherine Richardson | Columns


I don’t ride anything that can make its own decisions

Camden is, without a doubt, a horse town. Kershaw County is a horse county and the love for horses extends throughout this great area of South Carolina. However, it stops at my door.

April 18, 2014 | Gary Phillips | Columns


My preperation for Easter

Easter is a holiday of two extremes. On one side is a covert celebration of springtime with cute bunnies and pretty dresses and Easter egg hunts and chicks and flowers and lambs. On the other is a lamb being slaughtered on Passover. There is a bloodstained cross on which a Jewish man is dying who proclaimed that he was the Son of God, and that he had to be killed so that God's wrath against my sins could be carried out not against me but against him.

April 18, 2014 | Tenell Felder | Columns


Erasing the race card

WASHINGTON -- One approaches the race fray with trepidation, but here we go, tippy-toe.

April 18, 2014 | Kathleen Parker | Columns


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