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Lives in common

The woman looked over the selection of books, picked up four and smiled. "My husband said to buy whatever I wanted."

March 24, 2014 | By Ronda Rich www.rondarich.com | Columns


Camden’s Robert Mills jail

When you are researching Robert Mills, South Carolina's first superintendent of public buildings, you inevitably end up trekking off to the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, the repository for South Carolina's historical state documents. We have an "inside track" there. One of our staff members, Sarah Murray, is married to Robert Murray, a long-time state archives employee. As a prelude to some of our research trips there, we ask Robert to scope out our prospects when the on-line database at the state archives does not yield what we are looking for. Sure enough, Robert found that ...

March 21, 2014 | By Katherine Richardson C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Being Vladimir Putin

WASHINGTON -- "Once an agent, always an agent."

March 21, 2014 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


This is not Mayberry

Anyone who knows me knows I am a big fan of The Andy Griffith Show. They especially know it if my cell phone happens to ring, as my ringtone is the song "The Fishing Hole," more commonly known as The Andy Griffith Show theme song. When it goes off, how can you not picture Andy and Opie coming down the dirt road with their fishing poles?

March 21, 2014 | Gary Phillips | Columns


Little chance of corporate reform

Conservatives are mightily concerned -- rightly so -- about runaway entitlement spending in this country. Various social programs enacted since Lyndon Johnson's Great Society began in the mid-1960s are at a boiling point.

March 21, 2014 | | Columns


A very big deal: S.C. ranked seventh in digital learning

No, this is not a typo or misprint. No, we did not leave out a number, and South Carolina is not 27th, or 37th or 47th. We are indeed tied for the seventh spot in the country in overall online leaning. Amazing -- but true.

March 19, 2014 | By Phil Noble C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Shakespeare speaks the truth

One of my favorite poems of all time is William Shakespeare's "That time of year thou may'st in me behold." It's one of Shakespeare's famous sonnets, one I studied in high school, undergraduate and graduate school. I've always loved it because it's not your typical love poem. It begins, "That time of year thou may'st in me behold/When yellow leaves, or none or few, do hang/Upon those boughs which shake against the cold."

March 19, 2014 | Haley Atkinson | Columns


Noah’s ark of triumph

WASHINGTON -- There's nothing quite so helpful as a fatwa and threats of a Christian boycott to create buzz in advance of new movie.

March 19, 2014 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Time to spread some Sunshine again

"Open government is neither a Democratic or Republican issue. It is an American value that we all must uphold." --Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont), March 11, 2014, chairing this year's annual Judiciary Committee hearing on government transparency.

March 17, 2014 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


The S.C. state superintendent of education

In South Carolina, the State Superintendent of Education's position is an elected office. I suspect having to raise megabucks and participate in South Carolina's hardball politics prevents a lot of very qualified people from running.

March 17, 2014 | KCSD Superintendent Dr. Frank Morgan C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Looking to help

They all come with some kind of a price and all with a certain amount of disappointment but still Rodney keeps trying.

March 17, 2014 | By Ronda Rich www.rondarich.com | Columns


Southern Charm isn’t charming

I'm not much for reality shows on television, but when I saw an advertisement for Southern Charm, a show set in Charleston, I thought I'd take a look.

March 14, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Wired to connect

Can we fully live without human connectedness? I believe I will rely on researchers at Psychology Today or the like to tackle and decipher all the answers to this tough question, but will safely say in my opinion, a life without human contact would not hold significant worth for most of us. We can attest to this by the relationships, the connectedness we hold with family, friends, with perfect strangers. It is the daily connections we have with our mom, our dad, our sister, our brother, our neighbor, our best friend, our co-worker. It is the guy in front of ...

March 14, 2014 | Paula Joseph | Columns


Ferngate

WASHINGTON -- I must need to smoke pot.

March 14, 2014 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


It’s time to close, and lock, the ‘-gate’

The Watergate scandal. It all started with the June 17, 1972, break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters inside the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C., and resulted more than two years later in the first resignation by a sitting U.S. President. I was 14 at the time of the break-in and I remember it well. It seemed like that was all that was on the national TV newscasts for that entire two years and beyond. If Hollywood is to be believed, the break-in was first noticed and reported by a simple man from Greenbow, Ala., named Forrest ...

March 14, 2014 | Gary Phillips | Columns


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Articles by Section - Columns


Outrageous

You know what the most commonly used word in the English language seems to be?

April 18, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


“Robert Mills: Designs for Democracy”

Robert Mills was the first American born and trained architect. He called himself "Robert Mills, Architect of Public Buildings." Indeed, Mills established a new scale and standard for public buildings in Washington, D. C. when he designed the Treasury Building, the Patent Office, and the General Post Office in the 1830s and early 1840s. In other parts of the country, Mills designed buildings that were sensitive to regional values and local architectural traditions. Always his attention was on permanency and fireproofing for his public buildings.

April 18, 2014 | Katherine Richardson | Columns


I don’t ride anything that can make its own decisions

Camden is, without a doubt, a horse town. Kershaw County is a horse county and the love for horses extends throughout this great area of South Carolina. However, it stops at my door.

April 18, 2014 | Gary Phillips | Columns


My preperation for Easter

Easter is a holiday of two extremes. On one side is a covert celebration of springtime with cute bunnies and pretty dresses and Easter egg hunts and chicks and flowers and lambs. On the other is a lamb being slaughtered on Passover. There is a bloodstained cross on which a Jewish man is dying who proclaimed that he was the Son of God, and that he had to be killed so that God's wrath against my sins could be carried out not against me but against him.

April 18, 2014 | Tenell Felder | Columns


Erasing the race card

WASHINGTON -- One approaches the race fray with trepidation, but here we go, tippy-toe.

April 18, 2014 | Kathleen Parker | Columns


A scorned South Carolina hero

April 11, 2014 was a very important day in the history of South Carolina. Few people noticed that anything much happened – but I would argue that this was the day we as a state did two very important things.

April 16, 2014 | Phil Noble | Columns


The Colbert Report

WASHINGTON -- In selecting Stephen Colbert to replace David Letterman as host of the "Late Show," CBS has waged war on America's heartland -- or so proclaims that Palm Beach font of heartland mirth, Rush Limbaugh.

April 16, 2014 | Kathleen Parker | Columns


Diamonds are the ‘better gang’ now

Americans love their sports. We especially love baseball, basketball, football and hockey. We love the Super Bowl, March Madness, the Stanley Cup and World Series.

April 14, 2014 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Focusing on finding the best healthcare outcomes

Recently, I attended the Congress on Healthcare Leadership presented by the American College of Healthcare Executives, and I was most impressed by one presentation: Building the New Healthcare Delivery System. In particular, I was struck by the fact that healthcare executives from across the country were focused almost exclusively on this new world of healthcare and its impact on how the organizations they lead are designed.

April 14, 2014 | By Terry Gunn, interim KershawHealth CEO C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Beautiful in a different way

She was not a pretty woman in the days of her youth. Her lips were too thin, her forehead too high and her eyes so round that they seemed to bulge into the lens of the glasses she wore.

April 14, 2014 | By Ronda Rich www.rondarich.com | Columns


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