View Mobile Site

Archive By Section - Columns


Life lessons from sad lotto winners

Feeling blue about losing $656 million Mega Millions jackpot lottery? Cheer up. Behind the lottery frenzy and hoopla, I've seen enough miserable winners over the years to conclude this: If you're not prepared to handle the pitfalls that follow a sudden windfall, you're probably better off without it.

April 09, 2012 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


The take-way from offender story

Today, we're publishing the second half of my two-part in-depth look at how the Kershaw County Sheriff's Office (KCSO) manages our county's portion of the South Carolina sex offender registry. I have to start by thanking Beverly Brevard for talking to me about the process.

April 09, 2012 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Mitt unzipped

WASHINGTON -- Mitt Romney "unzipped" is the stuff of cartoonists' dreams.

April 09, 2012 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Old-time politics

Back in the days before binding caucuses and every-other-day primaries, political conventions were fascinating.

April 06, 2012 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


The planes that didn’t crash

Most of us are familiar with the antiquated adage of "no news is good news" or its cohort, "bad news travels fast." With the former, the absence of information to the contrary justifies continued optimism. Bad news is usually associated with more urgent matters; matters we are inclined to transfer more quickly to one another. Good news is boring, right? News is defined one way as "matter that is newsworthy." Newsworthy is defined as "interesting enough to the general public to warrant reporting." If we really think about it, good news rarely fits the definition of "news" because it is ...

April 06, 2012 | Paula Joseph C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Obamacare faces the Supremes

Obamacare faced a tough crowd at the Supreme Court. But those tough, probing questions from Justice Anthony Kennedy, the court's key swing voter, give defenders of the Affordable Care Act reasons to have hope.

April 06, 2012 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


The human condition

Atheists have a new reason to say there's no such thing as "God" this week.

April 06, 2012 | Miciah Bennett | Columns


Caring for our battlefields of history

American soldiers on both sides never dreamed of airplanes in their combat when the battle of Camden was fought on August 16, 1780 at Gum Swamp. Yet, just a few weeks ago, I led the commanders and staff of much of the 9th (Ninth) Air Force and its fighter squadrons across our battlefield to study the terrain and tactics. What would today's Air Force Major General Lawrence Wells and his colonels care about a 232-year-old Revolutionary War battle? Simple question with a solid answer, of which many of our local citizens may not be aware. Technology, armaments, and accoutrements ...

April 06, 2012 | David Reuwer | Columns


Bridging gaps a must for any budget bill

Rep. Jim Cooper of Tennessee really wants some bigger acorns for next year's budget proposal and it seems many Americans do, too.

April 04, 2012 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


Why race matters in Florida murder

It is customary in the wake of a major racial eruption to say that we Americans need to have a national conversation on race. Yet the fury surrounding the death of Florida teen Trayvon Martin shows why it is so hard for us to hold that conversation.

April 02, 2012 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


The Man over the Mantel

In 1957, Elisabeth Doby English wrote: "Over the mantel in a certain Nashville, Tennessee, home hangs the portrait of a handsome Confederate officer in his uniform that the small boys of the household call 'The Man over the Mantel.'" That portrait of Captain Alfred English Doby was painted by William H. Scarborough in 1865 from a Civil War photograph.

April 02, 2012 | Kershaw County Historical Society Historian Harvey S. Teal | Columns


An alternate Internet history

Science fiction novels and comic books are filled with "What If?" stories. Marvel Comics had a long-running series of comics called, gee, "What If?" They still put a few out every now and then. Harry Turtledove is the master of alternate history fiction, supposing what America might have been like if aliens interrupted World War II or the South had won the Civil War.

April 02, 2012 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Big adventures, little dreams

I don't watch a lot of TV but every week or so I'll sit down and watch a drama-filled reality show with my sister or my mom. Last week, my sister and I were watching a show on Vh1 and my sister said, "I want to be best friends with ___." I thought it was funny and cute that my sister said that, because I think they could be great friends. A few days later, I walked into the den and my sister was watching the exact same show and said something similar: "I'm going to make ...

March 30, 2012 | Miciah Bennett | Columns


Many students, too little thought

You can lead a student to knowledge, according to an old academic saying, but you can't make them think.

March 30, 2012 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


‘One-and-done’ ruining game

With the NCAA's college basketball tournament coming to a head this weekend -- the championship game will be played Monday night -- it's time to take a look at one of the worst rules ever enacted: the National Basketball Association's 19-year-old minimum age, which has contributed to the "one-and-done" culture of today's college hoops scene: that is, players who come out of high school, go to college for one year and then skip to the NBA.

March 30, 2012 | Glenn Tucker C-I contributing editor | Columns


« First  « Prev  67 68 69 70 71  Next »  Last »

Page 69 of 119

Articles by Section - Columns


Got Putin, yet?

WASHINGTON -- The new "agreement" between Russia, the U.S. and our allies is exactly what the former KGB agent ordered.

April 23, 2014 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Just keep walking

Sylvia Plath said, in her autobiographical novel The Bell Jar, "There must be quite a few things a hot bath won't cure, but I don't know many of them." While I do fully agree with the literary force of genius that is Plath, if that had been my statement, I would have written it: "There must be quite a few things a hot bath or a long walk won't cure, but I don't know many of them."

April 23, 2014 | Haley Atkinson | Columns


Giving Back

Recently, I was listening to a talk radio host railing about how public schools "no longer teach values." This issue seems to be a mantra of sorts for some folks in the media, many of whom I suspect haven't been anywhere near a public school in years. As someone who is in public schools every day, I can't for the life of me figure out what this view is based on. I know it's not based on reality.

April 21, 2014 | | Columns


Easter Memories and Hope

It is each of the many Easters of my life that I remember more clearly than any other holiday. Christmases blur together with only a few standing out in my memory such as the one when it snowed all day, the year I lost my voice completely, and the two times that I wasn't home – one working in Washington, D.C. and another in London.

April 21, 2014 | Rhonda Rich | Columns


Noted and passed - April 21, 2014

** Thomas Ravenel, the former state treasurer who served prison time for cocaine distribution, now stars in a reality television show called "Southern Charm." Ravenel stumbles through the show in a haze of alcohol and bad judgment. He and his girlfriend, who's 30 years his junior, recently had a baby in Florida. Ravenel says he intends to revive his political career by running for the U. S. Senate from the Palmetto State. The guys in Vegas would probably lay some long odds on his chances for success.

April 21, 2014 | | Columns


Outrageous

You know what the most commonly used word in the English language seems to be?

April 18, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


“Robert Mills: Designs for Democracy”

Robert Mills was the first American born and trained architect. He called himself "Robert Mills, Architect of Public Buildings." Indeed, Mills established a new scale and standard for public buildings in Washington, D. C. when he designed the Treasury Building, the Patent Office, and the General Post Office in the 1830s and early 1840s. In other parts of the country, Mills designed buildings that were sensitive to regional values and local architectural traditions. Always his attention was on permanency and fireproofing for his public buildings.

April 18, 2014 | Katherine Richardson | Columns


I don’t ride anything that can make its own decisions

Camden is, without a doubt, a horse town. Kershaw County is a horse county and the love for horses extends throughout this great area of South Carolina. However, it stops at my door.

April 18, 2014 | Gary Phillips | Columns


My preperation for Easter

Easter is a holiday of two extremes. On one side is a covert celebration of springtime with cute bunnies and pretty dresses and Easter egg hunts and chicks and flowers and lambs. On the other is a lamb being slaughtered on Passover. There is a bloodstained cross on which a Jewish man is dying who proclaimed that he was the Son of God, and that he had to be killed so that God's wrath against my sins could be carried out not against me but against him.

April 18, 2014 | Tenell Felder | Columns


Erasing the race card

WASHINGTON -- One approaches the race fray with trepidation, but here we go, tippy-toe.

April 18, 2014 | Kathleen Parker | Columns


1

Page 1 of 1


Contents of this site are © Copyright 2014 Chronicle Independent All rights reserved. Privacy policy and Terms of service

Powered by
Morris Technology
Please wait ...