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Archive By Section - Columns


A balance of the good and the bad

Bear with me as I put a little of my comic book geek on to make a point about what makes the front pages of this newspaper.

June 18, 2012 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Too many choices can paralyze

Time's old adage says, "More money, more problems," but I think the problems come when people realize they have more choices available when they have more money.

June 15, 2012 | Miciah Bennett | Columns


City of Camden in great financial shape

Financially, the city of Camden is in great shape. Stockpiling citizen tax revenue is neither good for the citizen paying the tax or for the city not investing accordingly. Financial stability is not about how much the city collects, but about how well the monies are used. Without increasing your property taxes, the city has made significant progress by assessing requirements and strategically planning without taxing and spending.

June 15, 2012 | By Camden Mayor Jeffrey Graham C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Hard times, weak unions

Let's give Wisconsin voters some credit. While others try to find easy right-vs.-left explanations for Gov. Scott Walker's decisive victory, Badger State voters appeared to be worried less about politics than about their state's purse.

June 15, 2012 | | Columns


Can this really be happening?

Seldom have I witnessed such a gross malfunctioning of local governments as that which has developed in Camden and Kershaw County over the future of recreation programs to serve the citizenry.

June 15, 2012 | By Fred R. Sheheen C-I contributing columnist | Columns


In awe of people who can jam

You might have seen the segment on TV recently that spotlighted a guy who had virtually no musical talent, then dived one day into the shallow end of a pool and suffered a severe head injury, and days later sat down at a piano and played it like a virtuoso.

June 15, 2012 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Top three's dominance likely to continue at Wimbledon

Regardless of the outcome of Monday's rain delayed French Open final, the record books were destined to change.

June 13, 2012 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


Tobacco

Tobacco was an important part of life in Georgia during the thirties and forties. Every man smoked -- a pipe, cigar, or cigarette. Farmers raised tobacco as a money crop and their own use. Most women did not smoke; if they did so, they did it in private, certainly not on the street. My mother considered women who smoked to be "hussies," although she dipped snuff. I cannot remember her, in her few times of leisure, without a dip of snuff and a twig in her mouth and a spit can by her side. I certainly was not interested in becoming ...

June 13, 2012 | By Jean Pruett C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Nobody likes a loser

WASHINGTON -- For the past year, we've been relentlessly reminded that Republicans didn't especially love their front-running presidential candidate.

June 13, 2012 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Leaving behind a 'life' of crime

Whenever you get a promotion, or a new, better job somewhere else -- as you take on more responsibility -- you leave something behind.

June 11, 2012 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Our mirror-kissing culture

Psychological experts are engaged in a heated debate over a curiously underappreciated issue of our times: should "narcissistic personality disorder" continue to viewed as a mental illness? Or should we concede, in my view, that mirror-kissing personalities have become not only the norm but a national passion.

June 11, 2012 | By Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


An unconscionable mandate

"We have tried negotiation with the (Obama) administration and legislation with the Congress -- and we'll keep at it -- but there's still no fix. Time is running out."

June 11, 2012 | Ed Feulner The Heritage Foundation | Columns


Rich Diddy isn't the problem -- inequality is

Seldom has anybody's scholarship kicked up so much controversy.

June 08, 2012 | By Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Passions take you farther in life

Someone I met during the end of my junior year of college really showed me the difference between having a passion and an interest. Throughout my relationship with this person, I've recognized the importance and value of having interests and fueling passions.

June 08, 2012 | Miciah Bennett | Columns


Absentee father

I never knew my father; he died when I was five months old, leaving my mother with me and my 3-year-old brother. We were not his first family. He had nine children by his first wife, eight girls and one boy -- five little graves attested to the mortality rate in earlier times. Many first wives died before their husbands, not surprising since childbirth was so dangerous and the mortality rate so high. I cannot imagine having more children -- especially since my father was 63 when I was born and my mother was 40. Back then, people just had the number ...

June 08, 2012 | By Jean Pruett C-I contributing columnist | Columns


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Articles by Section - Columns


Got Putin, yet?

WASHINGTON -- The new "agreement" between Russia, the U.S. and our allies is exactly what the former KGB agent ordered.

April 23, 2014 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Just keep walking

Sylvia Plath said, in her autobiographical novel The Bell Jar, "There must be quite a few things a hot bath won't cure, but I don't know many of them." While I do fully agree with the literary force of genius that is Plath, if that had been my statement, I would have written it: "There must be quite a few things a hot bath or a long walk won't cure, but I don't know many of them."

April 23, 2014 | Haley Atkinson | Columns


Giving Back

Recently, I was listening to a talk radio host railing about how public schools "no longer teach values." This issue seems to be a mantra of sorts for some folks in the media, many of whom I suspect haven't been anywhere near a public school in years. As someone who is in public schools every day, I can't for the life of me figure out what this view is based on. I know it's not based on reality.

April 21, 2014 | | Columns


Easter Memories and Hope

It is each of the many Easters of my life that I remember more clearly than any other holiday. Christmases blur together with only a few standing out in my memory such as the one when it snowed all day, the year I lost my voice completely, and the two times that I wasn't home – one working in Washington, D.C. and another in London.

April 21, 2014 | Rhonda Rich | Columns


Noted and passed - April 21, 2014

** Thomas Ravenel, the former state treasurer who served prison time for cocaine distribution, now stars in a reality television show called "Southern Charm." Ravenel stumbles through the show in a haze of alcohol and bad judgment. He and his girlfriend, who's 30 years his junior, recently had a baby in Florida. Ravenel says he intends to revive his political career by running for the U. S. Senate from the Palmetto State. The guys in Vegas would probably lay some long odds on his chances for success.

April 21, 2014 | | Columns


Outrageous

You know what the most commonly used word in the English language seems to be?

April 18, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


“Robert Mills: Designs for Democracy”

Robert Mills was the first American born and trained architect. He called himself "Robert Mills, Architect of Public Buildings." Indeed, Mills established a new scale and standard for public buildings in Washington, D. C. when he designed the Treasury Building, the Patent Office, and the General Post Office in the 1830s and early 1840s. In other parts of the country, Mills designed buildings that were sensitive to regional values and local architectural traditions. Always his attention was on permanency and fireproofing for his public buildings.

April 18, 2014 | Katherine Richardson | Columns


I don’t ride anything that can make its own decisions

Camden is, without a doubt, a horse town. Kershaw County is a horse county and the love for horses extends throughout this great area of South Carolina. However, it stops at my door.

April 18, 2014 | Gary Phillips | Columns


My preperation for Easter

Easter is a holiday of two extremes. On one side is a covert celebration of springtime with cute bunnies and pretty dresses and Easter egg hunts and chicks and flowers and lambs. On the other is a lamb being slaughtered on Passover. There is a bloodstained cross on which a Jewish man is dying who proclaimed that he was the Son of God, and that he had to be killed so that God's wrath against my sins could be carried out not against me but against him.

April 18, 2014 | Tenell Felder | Columns


Erasing the race card

WASHINGTON -- One approaches the race fray with trepidation, but here we go, tippy-toe.

April 18, 2014 | Kathleen Parker | Columns


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