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Michelle Obama’s wings

WASHINGTON -- If second-term presidents feel liberated by re-election to pursue bolder agendas, first ladies often become more comfortable to be their own person.

March 04, 2013 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Thin mints are the greatest invention

Just a couple days ago I was discussing the greatest inventions of mankind with my lunch bunch.

March 01, 2013 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Signs that the NRA is losing

Now that they're facing Washington's first serious push for new gun violence prevention laws since the Columbine massacre, gun lobbyists are grasping at straws -- as in "straw" purchases.

March 01, 2013 | By Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Hold them close, then let them go

It's funny how parenting works. At times, I am wonderfully amazed at the position; in other moments, I am utterly confused by the entire ride as if I were falling down the rabbit hole. I believe it fair to say, even with all the preparations we think we've made, no one is ever ready. We are always caught off guard when parenthood chooses us. When the "smoke clears," we realize that, of all the balls ever thrown our way, this is the one we cannot drop. Having kids -- the charge of rearing good, ethical, responsible human beings -- is ...

March 01, 2013 | By Paula Joseph C-I contributing columnist | Columns


The world of Co-ops

Last weekend I attended a cooperative (co-op) development workshop sponsored by the National Cooperative Business Association (NCBA) I was invited to.

March 01, 2013 | Miciah Bennett | Columns


Two little red balls

My mother certainly was horrified that I seemed to enjoy learning, often telling me, "Boys do not like smart girls." Her idea of a good life for me was to find some man to take care of me, know all home skills such as cooking, sewing, etc., and fill the house with children. Today, because of her, I know those skills and enjoy them. I did however, only have one child because of unforeseen circumstances. Knitting, crocheting, needlepoint, crewel, and regular sewing often occupy my time. In fact, one of my grandchildren recently asked me, "Nana, do you still like ...

February 27, 2013 | By Jean Pruett C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Droning on about feelings

WASHINGTON -- First they came for the drones.

February 27, 2013 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


A fond farewell

One of my first tastes of a slice of life in Camden came nearly two years ago after cruising down the Wateree River with a couple of pirates.

February 27, 2013 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


Cupcakes

Being reared by a mother who was a wonderful cook, I rarely had the chance to do so, Mother's idea being for me to watch her do it. As most teenagers, I had little time for this inactive pursuit. Finally, Mother allowed me the honor of preparing a cake with her being the watcher. Since the cake to be baked was a pound cake, I thought this was a one-step procedure requiring little effort. How wrong I was! Mother had no mix master or electric appliance; the cook beat and beat and beat by hand. I had a much ...

February 25, 2013 | By Jean Pruett C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Time for a RINO Rebellion?

WASHINGTON -- RINO-hunting, the long popular political sport that morphed in 2008 into a sort of hysteria-driven obsession, lately has become a suicide mission.

February 25, 2013 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


It’s Citizens United all over again

Last July, I wrote about how disheartened I was that the Supreme Court of the United States refused, on a 5-4 partisan vote, to reconsider one of its worst decisions ever: Citizens United. The original 2010 ruling opened the door for "super" political action committees (Super PACs) to accept unlimited contributions and, in at least some cases, without full disclosure on where that money's coming from.

February 25, 2013 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


A Civil War history lesson

On the slope of Malvern Hill is where John Young saved Henry Truesdale's life. Jim Sheorn and W.S. Kirby were on each side of Young.

February 25, 2013 | By Buster Beckham C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Being a preacher isn't easy

Many years ago, when I was a fresh-faced, full-of-spit-and-vinegar young reporter, I wrote a story indicating that a local church had hired a new minister.

February 22, 2013 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Boys in the back of the class

Every year, millions of well-intentioned American kids show up at kindergarten or first grade woefully unprepared to learn. Some can't even tell you their own complete name, let alone spell any of it.

February 22, 2013 | By Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Tree Pruning 101 -- Part 2

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) for Tree Care Operations for Pruning states "The purpose of utility pruning is to prevent the loss of service, comply with mandated clearance laws, prevent damage to equipment, avoid access impairment and uphold the intended usage of the utility space." When I worked for the S.C. Forestry Commission, I quoted this statement many times at community forums in places such as Elloree, Charleston, Walterboro and Beaufort. These events were always in response to a utility provider coming into town, unannounced, and "doing their thing." While the majority of cuts were technically correct, their ...

February 22, 2013 | By Camden Urban Forester Liz Gilland C-I contributing columnist | Columns


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Articles by Section - Columns


Tucker: My dream job? Smphony conductor

If you could have any job in the world, what would it be?

April 17, 2015 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Parker: Ring in the olde?

WASHINGTON -- Americans, perhaps more than anyone, worship the future and resent the past.

April 17, 2015 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writer's Group | Columns


Phillips: For those who truly need it

I read with great interest last week news reports about a lawmaker in Missouri proposing tighter restrictions on what food products would be allowed to be purchased using an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card. The EBT card is the modern-day equivalent of what is commonly called "food stamps," and is a government-provided program for people of lower income to acquire food. EBT cards have a benefit amount credited to them each month and at the store function the same as a debit or credit card.

April 17, 2015 | Gary Phillips | Columns


Richardson: Golf in Camden

Springtime in the South comes with a guarantee of two things: great clouds of pollen and azaleas in full bloom. Springtime in the golf world means it's finally time for the Masters. My husband, an avid, albeit average golfer, was glued to the television when the Masters was being played. It was nirvana for him when his spring break fell during Masters Week. He could watch it every minute it was on the air. Of course, he was watching and appreciating the game of golf. I, on the other hand, was gawking at the golf course at Augusta every ...

April 17, 2015 | By Katherine Richardson C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Tatum: Stylin’ and profilin’

You think you're alone on the highway. You're sure of it -- not a soul in the rear view, not a glimmer on the horizon. Not even a billboard or bridge abutment.

April 15, 2015 | Jim Tatum | Columns


Arrants: ‘So, how’s Texas?’

"So, how do you like living in Texas?" Overwhelmingly, that is the question I've been asked repeatedly by both people I interact with here and back in South Carolina. Most pose the question in an uncomplicated way, often wanting to know what I like about Texas and what I might miss from South Carolina. Some follow up with another, more in-depth question about what I think is similar and/or different about the two states. Well, let's start with at the top and work from there.

April 15, 2015 | By Josh Arrants C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Parker: Rolling Stone gathers dirt -- on itself

WASHINGTON -- "As we asked ourselves how we could have gotten the story wrong..."

April 15, 2015 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writer's Group | Columns


Cahn: Does Tsarnaev deserve death penalty?

We journalists are, usually, taught not to use questions as headlines. This time, it's really to ask myself the question: Does convicted Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar "Jahar" Tsarvnaev deserve the death penalty?

April 13, 2015 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Rich: Miss Elinor’s thank you

It often amazes me how many words of kindness and encouragement I receive for the stories I tell. Often, a reader will write, "You don't know me, but I feel that we are friends."

April 13, 2015 | By Ronda Rich www.rondarich.com | Columns


Gunn: Joint replacement center offers new option

When the Joint Replacement Center at KershawHealth opened last month, it was a truly collaborative effort resulting in significant benefits for those having total joint replacement surgery. Today, the majority of patients will have surgery, begin therapy the same day and return home on the third day to continue their rehabilitation in the comfort of home. They will return to the things that mean the most to them -- home, family, work, and favorite activities -- sooner and further along in their recovery than before. Already, those who have been through the new program are excited about the change. They recognize the ...

April 13, 2015 | By Terry Gunn, KershawHealth CEO C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Beckham: ‘Oh, you’re the talent’

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be a Hollywood star? How would you feel strolling on the red carpet as flashbulbs popped and adoring fans called out to you on Oscar night?

April 13, 2015 | By Buster Beckham C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Tucker: Union fights an academy’s ‘Success’

Like most people, I'm interested in the public school system of this county and state. Often my interest goes beyond that, to other areas of the country, especially urban school systems, which have often struggled.

April 10, 2015 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Parker: Revenge of the help

WASHINGTON -- The new tell-all, "The Residence," featuring intimate anecdotes collected from past and current White House staff members, is absolutely delicious -- and utterly lacking in nutritious content.

April 10, 2015 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writer's Group | Columns


Phillips: The mysterious masked man

Those of you who are regular readers of my weekly offering here know I am a big fan of older TV shows. To me, the phrase "they just don't make 'em like that anymore" truly applies in so many cases.

April 10, 2015 | Gary Phillips | Columns


Joseph: The rent you pay

I had the pleasure of attending the United Way's volunteer recognition dinner this week.

April 10, 2015 | By Paula Joseph C-I contributing columnist | Columns


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