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No advances on fuel front

As the price of gasoline approaches $4 a gallon -- with many saying it will reach $5 -- I was thinking recently of a column I wrote a few years ago during a similar spike in prices.

February 24, 2012 | Glenn Tucker C-I contributing editor | Columns


Controversial Hall of Fame class could overshadow qualified candidates

Next year may go down as the year of the steroid user for Major League Baseball's Hall of Fame. Three players whose careers were given a proverbial black eye for using performance-enhancing drugs will be on 2013's ballot.

February 22, 2012 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


Civility is golden

WASHINGTON -- Can civility be saved?

February 22, 2012 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Grants and savings equal city improvements

Just recently, I was talking with a group of local citizens when someone mentioned the new street lights. In the past three years, the City of Camden has received and utilized grants in excess of $3 million for several improvements. A combination of grant funds and some tax dollars has been spent to move many electrical lines underground:

February 20, 2012 | Camden Mayor Jeffrey Graham C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Quality education has cost

A community member asked me recently why I place so much emphasis on the budget. The exact words were, "I think that's all you ever talk about." I guess I have to plead guilty to keeping the budget as a front burner issue. When I think about the discussions I have about our schools with parents, staff, students and community members, most of these discussions revolve around smaller class sizes, additional academic and extracurricular programs, competitive compensation, materials and supplies, technology and additional staff in areas such as nursing, maintenance, classroom assistants and clerical. All of these are areas ...

February 20, 2012 | Kershaw County School District Superintendent Dr. Frank Morgan C-I contributing columnist | Columns


America in ‘decline’ denial

Is America in decline? No way, says President Obama, proudly speaking of our standing overseas. But some grim new reports on our educational gaps remind us that decline is like charity -- it begins at home.

February 20, 2012 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Madonna, Whitney, Adele

It's no secret I love music. I was a radio announcer in an earlier life, after all. I love all kinds -- rock, jazz, pop, soundtracks -- just about anything.

February 20, 2012 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


The power of losing

WASHINGTON -- Mitt Romney's recent losses to Rick Santorum in Colorado, Missouri and Minnesota revealed a truism that Romney might want to study -- but not too much!

February 17, 2012 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Don’t be ‘that’ person; make a difference

Doing the research for my column on voting statistics encouraged me not to be that person. You know -- that person who complains but doesn't do anything to help the cause. As I get older and gain more life experience, I find that it is really important to get interested in life, not on the surface but really dig deep into how the world is changing socially, culturally, fiscally.

February 17, 2012 | Miciah Bennett | Columns


A virus of violence

As a fan of Stephen Colbert's satirical skills on Comedy Central's "The Colbert Report," I didn't know what to expect when he sat down to interview the daughter of Jeff Fort, one of Chicago's most notorious gang leaders since Al Capone.

February 17, 2012 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


The brute mentality

I've come to the conclusion that women's friendships might be tighter than men's.

February 17, 2012 | Glenn Tucker C-I contributing editor | Columns


New radio show will boost former presidential candidate’s presence

Talk radio's No. 1 blowhard Rush Limbaugh will soon have competition in his afternoon timeslot with former White House contender Mike Huckabee set to begin a new program over the air waves in April.

February 15, 2012 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


Stubborn and stupid

Many people believe what is necessary to gain a Ph.D. is superior intelligence. Such a belief is certainly a fallacy. What a person requires is two items: obstinacy and stupidity. As a person who has washed a rather large wooden house with a rag, water, and scouring powder; cut front and back yards, when yards really were yards, with a pair of scissors; and dressed a half a hog, chitterlings and all -- I know. These examples occurred in my youth, and, seemingly, I gathered only worn and blistered hands as my lessons. I did learn from an admonition from ...

February 15, 2012 | Jean Pruett C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Birth control redux

WASHINGTON -- Most Americans can hardly believe we're having a national debate about birth control in the 21st century -- more than 50 years after The Pill became available and decades after condoms became as commonplace as, well, balloons.

February 15, 2012 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Is America coming apart?

This may sound a little odd, but I believe that I need to pay more attention to white people.

February 13, 2012 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


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Articles by Section - Columns


Outrageous

You know what the most commonly used word in the English language seems to be?

April 18, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


“Robert Mills: Designs for Democracy”

Robert Mills was the first American born and trained architect. He called himself "Robert Mills, Architect of Public Buildings." Indeed, Mills established a new scale and standard for public buildings in Washington, D. C. when he designed the Treasury Building, the Patent Office, and the General Post Office in the 1830s and early 1840s. In other parts of the country, Mills designed buildings that were sensitive to regional values and local architectural traditions. Always his attention was on permanency and fireproofing for his public buildings.

April 18, 2014 | Katherine Richardson | Columns


I don’t ride anything that can make its own decisions

Camden is, without a doubt, a horse town. Kershaw County is a horse county and the love for horses extends throughout this great area of South Carolina. However, it stops at my door.

April 18, 2014 | Gary Phillips | Columns


My preperation for Easter

Easter is a holiday of two extremes. On one side is a covert celebration of springtime with cute bunnies and pretty dresses and Easter egg hunts and chicks and flowers and lambs. On the other is a lamb being slaughtered on Passover. There is a bloodstained cross on which a Jewish man is dying who proclaimed that he was the Son of God, and that he had to be killed so that God's wrath against my sins could be carried out not against me but against him.

April 18, 2014 | Tenell Felder | Columns


Erasing the race card

WASHINGTON -- One approaches the race fray with trepidation, but here we go, tippy-toe.

April 18, 2014 | Kathleen Parker | Columns


A scorned South Carolina hero

April 11, 2014 was a very important day in the history of South Carolina. Few people noticed that anything much happened – but I would argue that this was the day we as a state did two very important things.

April 16, 2014 | Phil Noble | Columns


The Colbert Report

WASHINGTON -- In selecting Stephen Colbert to replace David Letterman as host of the "Late Show," CBS has waged war on America's heartland -- or so proclaims that Palm Beach font of heartland mirth, Rush Limbaugh.

April 16, 2014 | Kathleen Parker | Columns


Diamonds are the ‘better gang’ now

Americans love their sports. We especially love baseball, basketball, football and hockey. We love the Super Bowl, March Madness, the Stanley Cup and World Series.

April 14, 2014 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Focusing on finding the best healthcare outcomes

Recently, I attended the Congress on Healthcare Leadership presented by the American College of Healthcare Executives, and I was most impressed by one presentation: Building the New Healthcare Delivery System. In particular, I was struck by the fact that healthcare executives from across the country were focused almost exclusively on this new world of healthcare and its impact on how the organizations they lead are designed.

April 14, 2014 | By Terry Gunn, interim KershawHealth CEO C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Beautiful in a different way

She was not a pretty woman in the days of her youth. Her lips were too thin, her forehead too high and her eyes so round that they seemed to bulge into the lens of the glasses she wore.

April 14, 2014 | By Ronda Rich www.rondarich.com | Columns


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