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The spirit of Christmas

Surrounded by the marvels of all the electronic capabilities among us today, I have put pen to paper to wish you a joyous holiday season. In the lifetime of our son, Edwards, we may see pen and paper become historic tools. So, while I can, I want to share a holiday message with each of you.

December 16, 2011 | Camden Mayor Jeffrey Graham C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Gingrich, anti-poverty warrior

'Tis the season, it appears, for Newt Gingrich to show his dual political personalities: naughty and nice.

December 16, 2011 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


The GOP’s death wish

WASHINGTON -- "Anybody but Mitt" has become a familiar mantra throughout the Republican primary campaign. It is also weird and self-defeating.

December 14, 2011 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Moving forward on missile defense

With Russian President Dmitry Medvedev issuing threats about America's planned missile defense for Europe, it may be time to remind the Obama administration why we need such defenses in the first place -- in Europe and elsewhere.

December 14, 2011 | Ed Feulner The Heritage Foundation | Columns


Cautioned campaign could cost Romney

Ann Romney may have given her husband Mitt the best campaign advice to this point in the race after Saturday's debate in Iowa.

December 14, 2011 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


Could we find life on Kepler-22b

If the data from the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is right, there's at least one planet with the potential of harboring life. Perhaps, based on the data, there are thousands upon thousands of such worlds.

December 12, 2011 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Debates as un-reality TV

Karl Rove, a star political strategist, is outraged that Donald Trump, a star real-estate mogul and reality show host, is staging a reality show with real Republican presidential candidates and calling it a debate. Yet, with all due respect, Trump is only exploiting a process that political strategists like Rove already hijacked.

December 12, 2011 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Let them clean toilets

WASHINGTON -- It is a rare day when Al Sharpton emerges as the voice of sagacity, but when Newt Gingrich has the microphone, all things are possible.

December 12, 2011 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Blow taps for the tea party

If history tells us anything, the rise of sometime-historian Newt Gingrich to Republican presidential frontrunner is a sign that the tea party movement is destroying itself.

December 09, 2011 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Give gadget gifts a gander

Welcome to Tucker's Christmas Mart, the store where you purchase gifts that seem like a good idea at the time but end up on the junk pile by the time New Year's Day arrives.

December 09, 2011 | Glenn Tucker C-I contributing editor | Columns


Oden’s successful return would be captivating storyline

Basketball fans knew a lot about former Ohio State center Greg Oden when he made the jump to the NBA in 2007. They knew he was going to be the Portland Trail Blazers' top pick in the draft that year. They knew he was one of the best collegiate players at the time. And they knew he had a chance to be a once-in-a-generation player in the pros. But there was also chatter that he could one day be one of the biggest disappointments in league history.

December 07, 2011 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


The surging Newt

WASHINGTON -- Things sure do change fast around here. One week it's Rick Perry, the next it's Herman Cain. Now it's ... Newt Gingrich?

December 07, 2011 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


A ‘followership’ crisis

When somebody complains about how politicians are a bunch of corrupt, lazy, no-account bums, Rep. Barney Frank has been known to reply with a wry grin: "Y'know, the public is no bargain, either."

December 05, 2011 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


A 1799 Camden letter and postmark

In 1989 Robert J. Stets and Harvey S. Teal completed and published "South Carolina Postal History and Illustrated Catalog of Postmarks, 1760-1860." Included in this work were six different postmarks and 14 different rate markings used by Camden postmasters during antebellum times. An illustration of them accompanies this article.

December 05, 2011 | Kershaw County Historical Society Historian Harvey S. Teal | Columns


Remembering one of our ‘Greatest Generation’

As a reporter, there are times when your editor comes to you with a story assignment that -- you can't help it -- makes you cringe. I'm not a golf fan. I don't play, I rarely watch and I certainly had no interest a number of years ago in following a couple of guys in their 80s and their grandsons around a golf course. It just wasn't my thing.

December 05, 2011 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


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Articles by Section - Columns


Outrageous

You know what the most commonly used word in the English language seems to be?

April 18, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


“Robert Mills: Designs for Democracy”

Robert Mills was the first American born and trained architect. He called himself "Robert Mills, Architect of Public Buildings." Indeed, Mills established a new scale and standard for public buildings in Washington, D. C. when he designed the Treasury Building, the Patent Office, and the General Post Office in the 1830s and early 1840s. In other parts of the country, Mills designed buildings that were sensitive to regional values and local architectural traditions. Always his attention was on permanency and fireproofing for his public buildings.

April 18, 2014 | Katherine Richardson | Columns


I don’t ride anything that can make its own decisions

Camden is, without a doubt, a horse town. Kershaw County is a horse county and the love for horses extends throughout this great area of South Carolina. However, it stops at my door.

April 18, 2014 | Gary Phillips | Columns


My preperation for Easter

Easter is a holiday of two extremes. On one side is a covert celebration of springtime with cute bunnies and pretty dresses and Easter egg hunts and chicks and flowers and lambs. On the other is a lamb being slaughtered on Passover. There is a bloodstained cross on which a Jewish man is dying who proclaimed that he was the Son of God, and that he had to be killed so that God's wrath against my sins could be carried out not against me but against him.

April 18, 2014 | Tenell Felder | Columns


Erasing the race card

WASHINGTON -- One approaches the race fray with trepidation, but here we go, tippy-toe.

April 18, 2014 | Kathleen Parker | Columns


A scorned South Carolina hero

April 11, 2014 was a very important day in the history of South Carolina. Few people noticed that anything much happened – but I would argue that this was the day we as a state did two very important things.

April 16, 2014 | Phil Noble | Columns


The Colbert Report

WASHINGTON -- In selecting Stephen Colbert to replace David Letterman as host of the "Late Show," CBS has waged war on America's heartland -- or so proclaims that Palm Beach font of heartland mirth, Rush Limbaugh.

April 16, 2014 | Kathleen Parker | Columns


Diamonds are the ‘better gang’ now

Americans love their sports. We especially love baseball, basketball, football and hockey. We love the Super Bowl, March Madness, the Stanley Cup and World Series.

April 14, 2014 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Focusing on finding the best healthcare outcomes

Recently, I attended the Congress on Healthcare Leadership presented by the American College of Healthcare Executives, and I was most impressed by one presentation: Building the New Healthcare Delivery System. In particular, I was struck by the fact that healthcare executives from across the country were focused almost exclusively on this new world of healthcare and its impact on how the organizations they lead are designed.

April 14, 2014 | By Terry Gunn, interim KershawHealth CEO C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Beautiful in a different way

She was not a pretty woman in the days of her youth. Her lips were too thin, her forehead too high and her eyes so round that they seemed to bulge into the lens of the glasses she wore.

April 14, 2014 | By Ronda Rich www.rondarich.com | Columns


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