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A whispering campaign

We've come a long way from President Theodore Roosevelt's famous saying "Speak softly and carry a big stick." President Barack Obama's policy apparently is to whisper slyly and compromise our security.

April 16, 2012 | Ed Feulner The Heritage Foundation | Columns


Zimmerman’s arrest the right thing

I have held back on writing about the Trayvon Martin case in Sanford, Fla., a few miles north of Orlando. The fallout from 17-year-old Martin's death at the hands of George Zimmerman has been fraught with charges of police corruption; hand-wringing over Florida's self-defense law; and, of course, racial overtones.

April 16, 2012 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Rediscovering entrepreneurship in all organizations

Everyone agrees that entrepreneurship is a good thing. But what exactly is entrepreneurship?

April 13, 2012 | Dr. Anthony Woodlief President, Bill of Rights Institute | Columns


An old narrative that never dies

Hollywood's version of Harper Lee's brilliant novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" turns 50 this year, which offers President Barack Obama a rare opportunity. For once, he can venture, however cautiously, near the touchy topics of race and justice without risking too much of a political backlash.

April 13, 2012 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Sad, but true, but changing

Earlier this week I said to my co-workers, "I don't know how people stay married for so long; I get tired of people after a few months." They laughed, I laughed; it's sad, but true.

April 13, 2012 | Miciah Bennett | Columns


Tending to Fido’s mental health

Let's talk about dogs.

April 13, 2012 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Sensibilities of Griffin, Luck should ensure future success

"A bust; talented but extremely disappointing; annually and incredibly overweight" -- those aren't the words you want to hear when you've just paid a guy nearly $40 million to be your new quarterback.

April 11, 2012 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


The quirky English language

English varies greatly from state to state and location to location. It varies when talking with friends or when speaking before an audience. Some of it is almost unintelligible for the novice, such as Gullah. The Southern drawl differs from the Yankee vernacular. Rarely does the person speaking recognize the difference for himself. For example, the Australians told me how charming my accent was. When I returned the compliment, some other tourists from the north said, "You really told them off, having no idea I could have said the same to them. When traveling, I have been mistaken for English ...

April 11, 2012 | Jean Pruett C-I contributing columnist | Columns


The judicial activism wars

WASHINGTON -- Last week I chided President Obama for his remarks on the Supreme Court and the role of "unelected" judges. The president, wisely, has since chosen to clarify his statement, and express his (correct) view -- that courts should be hesitant to overturn acts of Congress -- in a much more appropriate way. Now there's an example of problematic behavior coming from the judicial branch, with a federal appeals court going out of its way to pick a fight with the president. Talk about judicial activism -- this is a judicial temper tantrum.

April 11, 2012 | Ruth Marcus Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Life lessons from sad lotto winners

Feeling blue about losing $656 million Mega Millions jackpot lottery? Cheer up. Behind the lottery frenzy and hoopla, I've seen enough miserable winners over the years to conclude this: If you're not prepared to handle the pitfalls that follow a sudden windfall, you're probably better off without it.

April 09, 2012 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


The take-way from offender story

Today, we're publishing the second half of my two-part in-depth look at how the Kershaw County Sheriff's Office (KCSO) manages our county's portion of the South Carolina sex offender registry. I have to start by thanking Beverly Brevard for talking to me about the process.

April 09, 2012 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Mitt unzipped

WASHINGTON -- Mitt Romney "unzipped" is the stuff of cartoonists' dreams.

April 09, 2012 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Old-time politics

Back in the days before binding caucuses and every-other-day primaries, political conventions were fascinating.

April 06, 2012 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


The planes that didn’t crash

Most of us are familiar with the antiquated adage of "no news is good news" or its cohort, "bad news travels fast." With the former, the absence of information to the contrary justifies continued optimism. Bad news is usually associated with more urgent matters; matters we are inclined to transfer more quickly to one another. Good news is boring, right? News is defined one way as "matter that is newsworthy." Newsworthy is defined as "interesting enough to the general public to warrant reporting." If we really think about it, good news rarely fits the definition of "news" because it is ...

April 06, 2012 | Paula Joseph C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Obamacare faces the Supremes

Obamacare faced a tough crowd at the Supreme Court. But those tough, probing questions from Justice Anthony Kennedy, the court's key swing voter, give defenders of the Affordable Care Act reasons to have hope.

April 06, 2012 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


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Articles by Section - Columns


Lessons from Patient Zero

WASHINGTON -- Monica Lewinsky is trying to make lemonade out of 16-year-old lemons. Good for her, and good, ultimately, for us.

October 29, 2014 | By Ruth Marcus Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


The deepest hole

July 27 marked the beginning of the most stressful week of my life. It began with the surprising news of my aunt's passing, and on top of having to deal with that, I also had to get through my last week of two summer classes and do work for two other classes that would end the following week.

October 29, 2014 | Simone T. Owens | Columns


Bradlee contributed to our democracy

Ben Bradlee became editor of The Washington Post the year I was born, 1965. He stepped down when I was 26, in 1991, the year after I moved to the Midlands of South Carolina.

October 27, 2014 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Everything works out if you let it

A friend of mine, long embroiled in upsets, distractions, problems and tribulations, called one day to announce happily that she was learning to "let things roll right off my back."

October 27, 2014 | By Ronda Rich www.rondarich.com | Columns


Ebola fear and politics, from Bamberg to Bangkok

Ebola is scary. It has scared the bejesus out of us here in South Carolina, nationally and literally all over the world.

October 27, 2014 | By Phil Noble C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Why a hike in the gas tax is a terrible idea

The issue of road funding -- or, to put it slightly differently, the question of how South Carolina should fix its broken road system -- is now a constant topic in politics and the media. A fair number of state lawmakers have therefore begun to advocate what politicians always advocate when they don't want to make tough decisions about the budget: raising taxes, specifically the fuel tax.

October 27, 2014 | By Shawn McNamee S.C. Policy Council | Columns


Bears and wolves find a voice in the wilderness

WASHINGTON -- If politicians preying upon your attentions this season fail to inspire, you might seek common cause with the beasts -- the four-legged variety rather than those running for office.

October 24, 2014 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


The thuggery of sports

The wild world of sports seems these days to be filled with thugs and hooligans. I really don't mean to paint such a large group of people with such a wide brush, so I'll say there are plenty of athletes, the majority in fact, who are honest, decent citizens who abide by the accepted rules of humanity in all or most of what they do. But, like in most groups, it's the bad apples who get the most attention.

October 24, 2014 | Gary Phillips | Columns


Grilling steaks, frying turkeys

It's said that Bear Bryant, the legendary football coach at Alabama, once remarked, "Every man thinks he knows how to do two things perfectly: grill a steak and coach a football team."

October 24, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Aging leaves and Autumn color

Trees are fascinating biological wonders. From ancient bristle cone pines and towering redwoods out west to our widely diverse Southern forests, the life cycle of a tree provides us with year-round interest. One of the most intriguing and beautiful results of a tree's life cycle is autumn color.

October 24, 2014 | By Liz Gilland, Camden Urban Forester C-I contributing columnist | Columns


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