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Celebrating failure

WASHINGTON -- By the time Steve Jobs' Wikipedia page had been adjusted to past tense, eulogists had added a footnote to his biography of success. Failure.

October 19, 2011 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Struggling Colts should look for Luck in 2012

With about one-third of the pro football regular season over, the line between playoff contenders and divisional basement dwellers is becoming clear.

October 19, 2011 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


How local festivals improve our quality of life

During a recent weekend, I attended the Rock Around the Clock Festival in Winnsboro.

October 19, 2011 | Richard Eckstrom S.C. Comptroller | Columns


Solyndra case underscores flaws in 'stimulus act'

If anyone needs more proof that the White House sold us a bill of goods when it pressured Congress to pass the "stimulus" act of 2009, just look at what has happened with Solyndra Inc.

October 17, 2011 | Richard Eckstrom C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Two leaders lost, big lessons gained

What makes a great leader? While President Barack Obama and his Republican challengers grapple mightily with that question, the deaths of Steve Jobs and the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, two leaders who shunned political office, tell us the answer.

October 17, 2011 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Never name anything you're going to eat

It's kind of interesting the way we perceive our animals, especially pets, these days.

October 17, 2011 | Jim Tatum C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Dealing with online music overload

An interesting personal statistic (one I didn't realize until a few days ago): I have been out of the radio broadcasting business for longer than I was in it. I actually passed that landmark more than a year ago. I worked at radio stations, on and off, for 14 years, ending in the summer of 1995. That was 16 years ago. Where has the time gone?

October 17, 2011 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Look what we've 'Made in Taiwan'

As I write this column, my plane is taking off from Taiwan's Taoyuan Airport to bring me back home. It was a special visit to Taiwan -- one that helped put so many earlier visits into a larger perspective.

October 14, 2011 | Ed Feulner C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Being offended at being offended

Geez, we have become the most easily offended, quick-to-demand-an-apology, can't-take-a-joke society, maybe in the history of the world, even including Marco Polo, Julius Caesar, Richard Nixon and Steve Spurrier.

October 14, 2011 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Obama's lonely presidency

News media depict presidencies as long-running soap operas. The story doesn't end, but it goes through changes.

October 14, 2011 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


The tease says not

WASHINGTON -- Undoubtedly many Americans, not least among them television producers, are disappointed by Sarah Palin's decision not to run for president.

October 12, 2011 | Kathleen Parker Washington Writers Group | Columns


Haley's message lost in divisive attitude

Nikki Haley ran for governor on a very electable platform -- transparency, accountability and reform in state government.

October 12, 2011 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


Thank goodness for S.C.’s FOIA

As a reporter, I am very thankful for South Carolina's Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). You should be, too.

October 10, 2011 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


‘Flash mob politics,’ from both sides now

They're mad -- mad as hell! -- and they're taking their anger to the streets.

October 10, 2011 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


School 'historians'

On Feb. 4, 1904, the Camden Chronicle and the Wateree Messenger were joined by a third newspaper in Camden, the People, whose editor was J. A. Shrock. In his first issue editor Shrock introduced a serial feature, "Graded School Compositions," which appeared in almost every issue until late May 1904. Shrock explained, "The editor was unfortunate … to secure only a limited education, and feels the keenest interest in assisting others who were more fortunate than himself."

October 10, 2011 | Kershaw County Historical Society Historian Harvey S. Teal | Columns


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Page 84 of 119

Articles by Section - Columns


Outrageous

You know what the most commonly used word in the English language seems to be?

April 18, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


“Robert Mills: Designs for Democracy”

Robert Mills was the first American born and trained architect. He called himself "Robert Mills, Architect of Public Buildings." Indeed, Mills established a new scale and standard for public buildings in Washington, D. C. when he designed the Treasury Building, the Patent Office, and the General Post Office in the 1830s and early 1840s. In other parts of the country, Mills designed buildings that were sensitive to regional values and local architectural traditions. Always his attention was on permanency and fireproofing for his public buildings.

April 18, 2014 | Katherine Richardson | Columns


I don’t ride anything that can make its own decisions

Camden is, without a doubt, a horse town. Kershaw County is a horse county and the love for horses extends throughout this great area of South Carolina. However, it stops at my door.

April 18, 2014 | Gary Phillips | Columns


My preperation for Easter

Easter is a holiday of two extremes. On one side is a covert celebration of springtime with cute bunnies and pretty dresses and Easter egg hunts and chicks and flowers and lambs. On the other is a lamb being slaughtered on Passover. There is a bloodstained cross on which a Jewish man is dying who proclaimed that he was the Son of God, and that he had to be killed so that God's wrath against my sins could be carried out not against me but against him.

April 18, 2014 | Tenell Felder | Columns


Erasing the race card

WASHINGTON -- One approaches the race fray with trepidation, but here we go, tippy-toe.

April 18, 2014 | Kathleen Parker | Columns


A scorned South Carolina hero

April 11, 2014 was a very important day in the history of South Carolina. Few people noticed that anything much happened – but I would argue that this was the day we as a state did two very important things.

April 16, 2014 | Phil Noble | Columns


The Colbert Report

WASHINGTON -- In selecting Stephen Colbert to replace David Letterman as host of the "Late Show," CBS has waged war on America's heartland -- or so proclaims that Palm Beach font of heartland mirth, Rush Limbaugh.

April 16, 2014 | Kathleen Parker | Columns


Diamonds are the ‘better gang’ now

Americans love their sports. We especially love baseball, basketball, football and hockey. We love the Super Bowl, March Madness, the Stanley Cup and World Series.

April 14, 2014 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Focusing on finding the best healthcare outcomes

Recently, I attended the Congress on Healthcare Leadership presented by the American College of Healthcare Executives, and I was most impressed by one presentation: Building the New Healthcare Delivery System. In particular, I was struck by the fact that healthcare executives from across the country were focused almost exclusively on this new world of healthcare and its impact on how the organizations they lead are designed.

April 14, 2014 | By Terry Gunn, interim KershawHealth CEO C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Beautiful in a different way

She was not a pretty woman in the days of her youth. Her lips were too thin, her forehead too high and her eyes so round that they seemed to bulge into the lens of the glasses she wore.

April 14, 2014 | By Ronda Rich www.rondarich.com | Columns


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