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Overcrowding

At the beginning of one school year, I entered my room to see an extra row of filled desks as well as students enough to fill another row. There was hardly enough room to squeeze sideways through the rows to give help. If anyone had tried, bending would have presented a posterior to the pupil in the desk on the adjoining row. The students looked at me; I looked at them. Then they began to beg. "Please, Ms. Pruett, do not move any of us." They were smart enough to know no teacher could have so many students in one ...

August 01, 2012 | By Jean Pruett C-I contributing columnist | Columns


The camera's place in court

WASHINGTON -- The video of James Holmes from inside the Arapahoe County Courthouse was as mesmerizing as it was creepy. His fluorescent mop of pink and orange hair. His vacant eyes, alternately bulging and droopy. Was he medicated? Crazy? Vamping for the camera? And the question, unbidden and against journalistic interest: Should we really be seeing this? Is justice best served by having a camera in this courtroom?

August 01, 2012 | By Ruth Marcus Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Gun lobby fires up Obama fear

As with other mass shootings, the killings at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo., trigger a familiar chain of reactions: horror, remorse, rage and a call for new restrictions on guns.

July 30, 2012 | By Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Lt. William E. Johnson Jr.

In 2010, Broadus R. Littlejohn, a Spartanburg collector, gave Wofford College a very large collection of books, pamphlets, documents and manuscripts. Among his gift were more than two dozen Civil War letters and a diary Lt. William E. Johnson Jr. of Liberty Hill kept from May 1864 until June 1865 while he was a Union prisoner-of-war.

July 30, 2012 | By Harvey S. Teal Provided by the Kershaw County Historical Society | Columns


What 'Dark Knight' says about us

On the surface, it seems silly to devote a column to deconstructing a superhero movie, even a huge blockbuster like The Dark Knight Rises. What could be more frivolous, after all, than spending $10 to $20 bucks (popcorn and drink included) to see a summer flick?

July 30, 2012 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


My quest for 'commonsense' gun laws

In the wake of the Colorado catastrophe, in which a maniac shooter killed at least a dozen people in a theater showing the latest Batman movie, everyone seems to be calling for "commonsense" gun laws. Unfortunately it's hard to tell whose sense is common enough these days.

July 27, 2012 | | Columns


Smells like dead whale

Have you ever smelled a dead whale?

July 27, 2012 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Carey may be what 'Idol' needs

$18 million. That's, reportedly, what it's going to take to get vocal-powerhouse Mariah Carey to sit on the beloved American Idol judging panel.

July 27, 2012 | Miciah Bennett | Columns


DeMint's divergent legacy

For nearly the last five decades, South Carolina has been represented in the U.S. senate by only four men. By all indications, however, that's set to be five by 2016. A reading of the political tea leaves shows that Sen. Jim DeMint will not be seeking reelection in the fall of 2016.

July 25, 2012 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


Brick streets, the first Lugoff and commerce

Herbert Cooke's father worked for the city of Camden. His job was to take care of the city streets. He used either the city's mules, horses or oxen and a bamboo apparatus to clean the brick streets. Nancy Ogburn and George Sandy can recall the brick streets around the old city hall which was located on Rutledge Street.

July 25, 2012 | By Buster Beckham C-I contributing columnist | Columns


The Bain of truth

WASHINGTON -- When it comes to over-the-top politics, the Obama campaign has set a new standard with recent attempts to paint Mitt Romney as a felon.

July 25, 2012 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Trying to measure up

From the time a person is born to the time he dies, he is attempting to measure up or satisfy someone else's whims. For example, as a child he attempts to please his parents or his friends. Later, the spectrum of those he must please expands to all in his social strata, work place, and home. The chore of measuring up never ceases.

July 23, 2012 | By Jean Pruett C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Veto session marks end of long budget process

The General Assembly met last week to consider Governor Haley's budget vetoes. Having originally decided to meet in September, the Legislature changed its plans because two of the budget vetoes wiped out two state agencies and other vetoes created uncertainties that needed to be resolved quickly, like funding of teacher pay raises before the start of the school year.

July 23, 2012 | By State Rep. Laurie Slade Funderburk C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Farewell to a voice of reason

He called himself a "solutionist." It's not what's "right" or "left" that counts, he would say; it's what works.

July 23, 2012 | By Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Blame Limbaugh for uncivil discourse

Twenty years or so ago, I worked at a prominent Columbia-area talk radio station. I worked behind the scenes, pushing buttons and making sure commercials got played when they were supposed to. For a long stretch, I handled the midday shift, from about 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Back then, one of my jobs was airing Rush Limbaugh's titular talk show.

July 23, 2012 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


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Page 88 of 148

Articles by Section - Columns


Cahn: Net neutrality is finally here

For those of you who believe in an open internet in the United States, the fight is still on. For the moment, though, we can bask in the glory of the U.S. Federal Communication Commission's (FCC) 3-2 vote last week to impose so-called "net neutrality" rules on internet service providers (ISPs).

March 02, 2015 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Rich: Don’t throw out good food

A friend, an only child, was talking about cleaning out her parents' house after the death of her father.

March 02, 2015 | By Ronda Rich www.rondarich.com | Columns


Teal: The story of temperance becoming abstinence

Throughout Old and New Testament times, most Jews and Gentiles consumed distilled liquor and believed it a healthy part of their daily diet. These beliefs and practices continued from the times of Christ through the settlement of America and the establishment of the United States.

March 02, 2015 | By Harvey S. Teal Provided by the Kershaw County Historical Society | Columns


Tucker: Lies, lies and more lies

Lying is in the news these days.

February 27, 2015 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


Parker: Twitter as America’s conscience

WASHINGTON -- Denizens of social media were rankled during Sunday night's Academy Awards telecast when actor Sean Penn made a crack about Mexican director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu and green cards.

February 27, 2015 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writer's Group | Columns


Phillips: For the love of animals

One of my weekly duties here at the Chronicle-Independent is to visit the Walter M. Crower Animal Shelter in Camden and take photos of pets available for adoption to be printed in our Friday edition each week. Actually, I take photos of two cats and two dogs and half of those are published weekly in the West Wateree Chronicle.

February 27, 2015 | Gary Phillips | Columns


Moment of Nature - Feb. 27, 2015

Murder is a strong word and truth be known it's not really what happens (unfortunately) when a crape myrtle, a Southern signature tree is topped, but it has become a familiar vernacular amongst plant people. If crape myrtles did in fact die when they were butchered, then the practice would stop.

February 27, 2015 | By Liz Gilland, Camden Urban Forester C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Parker: The love litmus test

Republicans seem ceaselessly enamored of litmus tests, but the newest one -- Do you believe President Obama loves America? -- makes birthers seem witty.

February 25, 2015 | | Columns


Tatum: Surfing back to the library

"Seriously, moron? How about just clean up the place already!"

February 25, 2015 | Jim Tatum | Columns


Wilson: Another tragic display of South Carolina’s domestic violence problem

On Feb. 5, around 1:15 p.m., students at the University of South Carolina (USC) received a text message warning "SHOTS FIRED" -- two words which would send chills and panic through the large campus that is home to nearly 32,000 students.

February 25, 2015 | By Alan Wilson, S.C. Attorney General C-I guest columnist | Columns


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