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Race to the Bottom

The state superintendent of education, Mick Zais, and Gov. Nikki Haley will not apply to the U.S. Department of Education for up to $50 million in federal Race to the Top funds allocated for South Carolina's public school system.

June 08, 2011 | Fred R. Sheheen C-I contributing columnist | Columns


The ramp

The C-130 was parked on the tarmac, her rear door open, yawning in the afternoon sun. The small, relatively quiet corner of the runway in which she was parked stood in contrast to the hustle and bustle of the surrounding airfield. The base, elsewhere, was alive with activity. This made perfect sense given that this was a warzone; schedules had to be kept, deadlines had to be met, missions had to be completed. Her crew had dispersed, but she remained, alone and waiting. The plane, a workhorse of her generation, had carried men and machine to theaters across the globe ...

June 06, 2011 | Dwight deLoach C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Citizen Cain, rhymes with 'pain'

To all of those readers who say I should pay more attention to the rising presidential campaign of Republican Herman Cain, I am happy to announce that he has it.

June 06, 2011 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Defunding defense

Can America's defense budget be cut? Yes. Unfortunately, President Obama is going about it exactly backwards.

June 06, 2011 | Ed Feulner The Heritage Foundation | Columns


Graduating seniors reminisce

One of the groups I meet with on a regular basis is Student Cabinet, which is made up of student leaders from each of our three high schools. It's always energizing and informative for me to hear the insights, opinions and perspectives from this very impressive group of young people.

June 06, 2011 | Kershaw County School District Superintendent Dr. Frank Morgan C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Getting America back in the space race

Fifty years ago in April, Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human being to be launched into space. Twenty-three days later, American Astronaut Alan Shepard became the second.

June 06, 2011 | Martin L. Cahn | Columns


Julie Andrews still the real deal

I have a friend who works in the television business out in Los Angeles. She's employed by the host of a late-night talk show, so meeting celebrities is an everyday occurrence for her as she deals with them on matters regarding the program.

June 03, 2011 | Glenn Tucker C-I contributing editor | Columns


The Poppy Red

I recently learned of another attribute of being the middle child -- family historian. How wonderful, I thought; I've been looking for more to do in my day. Besides, I'm the sibling in the middle; you know, the pleaser, the inventive one. I suppose this could be fun, maybe rather interesting, I announced with the slightest of sarcasm. So I accepted the 15-plus boxes with a smile.

June 03, 2011 | Paula Joseph C-I contributing columnist | Columns


Why libraries are still important

When discussing whether libraries will weather shifts in technology, librarians who have been on the scene longer (OK, only slightly longer) than I have like to mention how everyone was predicting our demise when the Internet came along in the '90s Instead, libraries added free access to the Internet to their missions, and in the process have helped millions bridge the digital divide. Anyone who's been in a library recently will likely attest that they are busy, vital places. Nonetheless, whether libraries are obsolete is a question that is perennially raised. I think the necessity of public libraries will ...

June 03, 2011 | Amy Schofield Kershaw County Library Director | Columns


Bringing back the lash

When Peter Moskos' new book landed on my desk, I wasn't sure if it was going to be a treatise on crime and punishment or some sort of kinky sex manual.

June 03, 2011 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Entitled to be a cad

WASHINGTON -- I write often about the problem of entitlement spending. Today's topic is the problem of entitlement behavior.

June 01, 2011 | Ruth Marcus Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Flushing New York

NEW YORK -- In a slender essay titled "Here Is New York," E.B. White wrote about the implausibility of the great city, mentioning among other things the millions of gallons of water needed each day just so people could brush their teeth.

June 01, 2011 | Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Don't count Federer out

No athlete can outrun the aging process as even the greatest of stars succumb to worn-out knees or a broken-down back or any of the other ailments that can sideline a player.

June 01, 2011 | Michael Ulmer | Columns


Make college worth the cost

It's hard to say which is more remarkable about Kayla Heard, that she is graduating this spring from Washington State University at age 16 or that she earned her degree without ever entering a classroom.

May 30, 2011 | Clarence Page Chicago Tribune | Columns


Back to the real world...

Well, we made it back.

May 30, 2011 | Jim Tatum C-I contributing columnist | Columns


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Articles by Section - Columns


Got Putin, yet?

WASHINGTON -- The new "agreement" between Russia, the U.S. and our allies is exactly what the former KGB agent ordered.

April 23, 2014 | By Kathleen Parker Washington Post Writers Group | Columns


Just keep walking

Sylvia Plath said, in her autobiographical novel The Bell Jar, "There must be quite a few things a hot bath won't cure, but I don't know many of them." While I do fully agree with the literary force of genius that is Plath, if that had been my statement, I would have written it: "There must be quite a few things a hot bath or a long walk won't cure, but I don't know many of them."

April 23, 2014 | Haley Atkinson | Columns


Giving Back

Recently, I was listening to a talk radio host railing about how public schools "no longer teach values." This issue seems to be a mantra of sorts for some folks in the media, many of whom I suspect haven't been anywhere near a public school in years. As someone who is in public schools every day, I can't for the life of me figure out what this view is based on. I know it's not based on reality.

April 21, 2014 | | Columns


Easter Memories and Hope

It is each of the many Easters of my life that I remember more clearly than any other holiday. Christmases blur together with only a few standing out in my memory such as the one when it snowed all day, the year I lost my voice completely, and the two times that I wasn't home – one working in Washington, D.C. and another in London.

April 21, 2014 | Rhonda Rich | Columns


Noted and passed - April 21, 2014

** Thomas Ravenel, the former state treasurer who served prison time for cocaine distribution, now stars in a reality television show called "Southern Charm." Ravenel stumbles through the show in a haze of alcohol and bad judgment. He and his girlfriend, who's 30 years his junior, recently had a baby in Florida. Ravenel says he intends to revive his political career by running for the U. S. Senate from the Palmetto State. The guys in Vegas would probably lay some long odds on his chances for success.

April 21, 2014 | | Columns


Outrageous

You know what the most commonly used word in the English language seems to be?

April 18, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Columns


“Robert Mills: Designs for Democracy”

Robert Mills was the first American born and trained architect. He called himself "Robert Mills, Architect of Public Buildings." Indeed, Mills established a new scale and standard for public buildings in Washington, D. C. when he designed the Treasury Building, the Patent Office, and the General Post Office in the 1830s and early 1840s. In other parts of the country, Mills designed buildings that were sensitive to regional values and local architectural traditions. Always his attention was on permanency and fireproofing for his public buildings.

April 18, 2014 | Katherine Richardson | Columns


I don’t ride anything that can make its own decisions

Camden is, without a doubt, a horse town. Kershaw County is a horse county and the love for horses extends throughout this great area of South Carolina. However, it stops at my door.

April 18, 2014 | Gary Phillips | Columns


My preperation for Easter

Easter is a holiday of two extremes. On one side is a covert celebration of springtime with cute bunnies and pretty dresses and Easter egg hunts and chicks and flowers and lambs. On the other is a lamb being slaughtered on Passover. There is a bloodstained cross on which a Jewish man is dying who proclaimed that he was the Son of God, and that he had to be killed so that God's wrath against my sins could be carried out not against me but against him.

April 18, 2014 | Tenell Felder | Columns


Erasing the race card

WASHINGTON -- One approaches the race fray with trepidation, but here we go, tippy-toe.

April 18, 2014 | Kathleen Parker | Columns


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