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Voter ID

Here in Kershaw County, we're like other Americans who live in a world in which we have to prove who we are. Before we are allowed to board airplanes, we must provide identification cards with our pictures on them. When we cash a check at the grocery store, the clerk usually asks for picture ID. When we pick up prescriptions at the pharmacy, we're often required to show similar proof of identification. Yet U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder has blocked a South Carolina law requiring voters to show picture IDs when they go to the polls to ...

January 11, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- Jan. 9, 2012

• South Carolina football coach Steve Spurrier usually says what he thinks. We liked his comment regarding punter Joey Scribner-Howard following the Capitol One Bowl victory: "You never see me yell at our punter when he kicks one of those 25-yarders. He does it in practice, too." Of course, Spurrier could afford to be whimsical since the Gamecocks had won; his analysis might not have been so good-natured had they lost.

January 09, 2012 | | Editorials


Stay home for the holiday

During the Christmas season over the past three decades, presidents of the United States have shown admirable fiscal restraint as well as concern for their staffs when they've chosen their holiday schedules. Most have spent their Christmases either at the White House or nearby Camp David, the presidential retreat in the Maryland mountains just outside the District of Columbia. That has avoided expensive travel to faraway places and has allowed countless government staffers to spend time with their families rather than having to be on the road. Then along came President Obama, who has chosen to pack up -- at ...

January 06, 2012 | | Editorials


USC victory

There certainly are University of South Carolina football fans here in Kershaw County who probably thought the so-called "chicken curse" would never die. There were decades of gridiron mediocrity, a 21-game losing streak back in 1998 and 1999, and even many moments of doubt after USC hired Steve Spurrier, one of the great college coaches of all time. But the curse was laid to rest Monday when the Gamecocks won a resounding victory over Nebraska in the Capitol One Bowl.

January 04, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- Jan. 2, 2012

• News reports of the funeral of North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il -- filmed by that country's government-controlled media, of course -- featured common citizens wailing in grief over the death of their beloved leader. Problem is, there didn't seem to be any genuine tears, just lots of contorted facial expressions. Think there's any chance that was all staged?

January 02, 2012 | | Editorials


Lifestyle trends

One of the most significant sociological trends of the past couple decades has been the increasing percentage of women who make up college student bodies. At many institutions of higher learning, 60 percent or more of the students are females, reversing the percentages of a generation ago. That, of course, is leading to better opportunities for women here in Kershaw County and across the country. In fact, women make up roughly half of all medical, law and accounting students, three professions that lead to high-paying and influential careers.

December 30, 2011 | | Editorials


GOP primaries

Less than four weeks remain before Kershaw County Republicans will join their counterparts across the state in casting their ballots to help determine which of the GOP candidates will advance to challenge President Obama in November. While national publicity concerning South Carolina too often centers on unpleasant things, the state takes center stage in the political circus that used to come once every four years but now seems to be with us nearly all the time.

December 28, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- Dec. 26, 2011

• We've watched with interest the controversy over the city of Camden's proposed YMCA, and the attendant give and take on both sides. City officials certainly could have been more receptive to those disagreeing with their positions, and some of the opponents could have been more circumspect with their jeers and boos at meetings. But the ongoing debate has been a healthy exercise in democracy and the right of both governing and dissenting. However, we were disappointed to see Y opponent Herb Farber characterize Mayor Jeffrey Graham in a recent news story as a "29-year-old boy." The statement came ...

December 26, 2011 | | Editorials


A wish for peace

As we celebrate Christendom's holiest day on Sunday, let us pause to wish a peaceful season to all in Kershaw County -- those who share Christianity, those who subscribe to other faiths and those who have no faith at all. And to the family of believers, we print once again the words from the second chapter of Luke that have come to be the basis of faith for so many millions of people across the United States and the world:

December 23, 2011 | | Editorials


Medicare

With the U.S. budget deficit still spiraling amid partisan stagnation and deadlock in Washington, two lawmakers, one a Republican and the other a Democrat, have finally come together to advance a proposal that would revamp the runaway costs of Medicare. Though solons in the nation's capital have refused thus far to address entitlement spending -- there's no way to bring the budget under control without changes to both Medicare and Social Security -- perhaps this is a ray of hope that there are some people in Washington who are willing to work together to salvage the fiscal integrity of ...

December 21, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- Dec. 19, 2011

• We observed last week that Republican candidates for president had no reason to subject themselves to a debate moderated by Donald Trump, who has continually threatened to run for the White House himself. They all apparently decided the same thing, and the debate has now been cancelled. Trump, meanwhile, says he's keeping his options open to mount a third-party presidential bid. If he does, we predict it will be met with the same lack of enthusiasm as his proposed debate.

December 19, 2011 | | Editorials


Public pensions

Public pensions have been much in the news since the economic downturn began, especially during the last year. The battle in Wisconsin over public employees' collective bargaining rights and pension plans has been the most publicized, but the same arguments have been occurring across the country. The South Carolina General Assembly has now taken the first step to deal with a $13-billion deficit in the state retirement pension fund, and though it involved difficult decisions on the part of a House subcommittee, it was the right thing to do. The recommendations still must go to the House Ways and Means ...

December 16, 2011 | | Editorials


Gingrich

Of all the presidential candidates, nobody was more a "dead man walking" than Newt Gingrich, the former U.S. House Speaker whose staff deserted him early in the campaign and who was left for dead by voters and the media. But he has been revived in the turbulent Republican race for the White House nomination and polls now show him leading his rivals in Iowa and South Carolina, and even in New Hampshire, where Mitt Romney is almost a neighbor. Ironically, it is Gingrich's ability to stand up and take the heat for his past conduct that is helping ...

December 14, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed for Dec. 12, 2011

• No matter how you feel about Tiger Woods -- it's a bit hard for us to pull for him given all the revelations about him -- one thing is clear: golf is more exciting with him. His win last Sunday at the Chevron Challenge, in which he birdied the final two holes to claim victory by a shot, was his first in two years. It'll be interesting to see how he does next year, and whether he can resume his chase of Jack Nicklaus' record number of victories in major championships, but as long as he's competitive there will ...

December 12, 2011 | Martin L. Cahn | Editorials


Changing opinion, not 'flip-flopping'

The term "flip-flop" has come to be one of the most caustic charges that can be thrown at a political candidate, and rightly so. It's hard to like a candidate who appears to bend his views to suit whichever audience he's addressing, and candidates who insist on taking one position one day and another the next day don't appear to be serious. But sometimes we as voters and political observers take this position to an extreme, pushing people into never changing their positions lest they be termed flip-floppers.

December 09, 2011 | | Editorials


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Articles by Section - Editorials


Cancer screening

We wrote recently of a change in the way KershawHealth is managing its emergency department, sending seriously threatened patients to one area for immediate, vital care while directing others who are less ill to be treated in a non-emergency system. It's cost-effective, but also provides quality care for both types of patients.

October 31, 2014 | | Editorials


Express Care

One of the problems with the expense of health care is the fact that many people tend to use a hospital's emergency room as their primary care facility, going there with normal ailments such as flu and severe colds. Emergency room care is expensive -- too costly to be used in that way. KershawHealth is no different than other hospitals in that regard, and the decision to "split" the emergency department there is a sound one.

October 29, 2014 | | Editorials


Your vote, your choice

Today, the Chronicle-Independent begins a series of articles summarizing the candidates and issues that will be on the Nov. 4 ballot, one week from Tuesday. Perhaps the most contentious race isn't between candidates but between "yes" and "no" on two referenda offered by the Kershaw County School District.

October 27, 2014 | | Editorials


Power, divided

We've always believed the United States government works best when power is divided -- that is, with a president from one party and a Congress controlled by the opposite party. As of now, of course, we have a Democratic president and a split Congress, with the House of Representatives controlled by Republicans and the Senate dominated by Democrats. There are multiple forecasting models out there for the upcoming election, with most of them giving the GOP a better-than-even chance of gaining a majority in the Senate while retaining control of the House.

October 24, 2014 | | Editorials


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