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Noted and passed

• We welcome newly hired Kershaw County Administrator Victor Carpenter, who comes to this area from Abbeville County; we hope Carpenter can lend some stability to a position that's had too much turnover in recent years. And while we're at it, let us offer a tip of the hat to Frank Broom, former Camden city manager, who served as interim county administrator and was able to "straight shoot" with council members, partly because he didn't have to worry about their becoming angry and siding against him, a concern that "regular" administrators naturally must harbor.

May 30, 2011 | | Editorials


Entitlement spending

With spending deficits that can't be sustained without driving this country to financial ruin, lawmakers in Washington have lots of choices before them. So far they seem to be ignoring them. But their job isn't easy, and this week's New York House of Representatives race, in which a Democrat captured a seat in a traditionally Republican district, became a referendum on cutting Medicare benefits, and voters said they didn't like that.

May 27, 2011 | | Editorials


Statuary to honor citizen, city

The city of Camden is blessed with a rich cultural heritage and an appreciation for the arts, so it comes as good news that a new statuary monument -- a tribute to one of Camden's long-time business and civic leaders -- is going to grace the new Town Green. This comes not long after the announcement that the Camden Archives grounds will be the site for statues of Bernard Baruch, a Camden native and international financier, and Larry Doby, who broke the color line in the American League.

May 25, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• We had hope that the "Gang of Six," a bipartisan group of U. S. senators which was examining ways to cut the deficit by trying to overcome the political logjam in Washington, could make progress. But Sen. Tom Coburn's decision to leave the group -- he and other members have been vilified by the far left and right, depending on whose ox was getting gored -- reduces the chance of success. Meanwhile, elected officials in the nation's capital continue to rail against each other while the deficit grows and threatens the fiscal survival of the nation. It's pitiful.

May 23, 2011 | | Editorials


KershawHealth

Layoffs and employment cutbacks have become an unwanted but common occurrence since the economic downtown began about four years ago. Nobody likes them, and they have caused untold grief for millions of American families. But in some cases, they have been necessary for companies and governmental entities to survive, and that's the sad fact that appears to be true about the recent layoffs at KershawHealth.

May 20, 2011 | | Editorials


Tribble sentence

In the last few years, the public has come to better appreciate the efforts and sacrifices made by law enforcement officers -- those who serve in small towns, large cities and rural areas across the country. That makes it difficult for everyone when an officer steps outside the bounds of acceptable conduct, as former Kershaw County Deputy Oddie Tribble did in beating a handcuffed prisoner in August of 2010. Tribble was sentenced earlier this week to serve more than five years in prison for the incident.

May 18, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• Kudos to the Kershaw County Library for joining a network that allows patrons to download audio books and e-books onto their computers and other electronic devices. As trends shift away from the printed page, the library isn't being left behind and is making changes necessary to continue as a relevant entity in a changing world. The local library has always been outstanding, and this is just one more development in a proud history.

May 16, 2011 | | Editorials


bin Laden

A couple weeks after Navy commandoes killed al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, Kershaw County residents are no doubt still celebrating with their countrymen his demise. Americans are by nature a compassionate people and not attuned to celebrating death; in this instance, it is justified in every way and a cause for joy, for bin Laden will endure in infamy as one of the most cold-hearted murderers the world has ever known.

May 13, 2011 | | Editorials


Issues cloud city rec project

Following the city of Camden's recent purchase of a portion of the former Mather Academy property, we commented that we favored the move and that if the city chose to replace the outdated Rhame Arena, then the Mather property could certainly be a suitable site. Though we didn't say so at the time, we felt all along that the city would be justified in replacing Rhame Arena, perhaps with updated amenities, but that the city didn't need to get into the business of offering a full-fledged gym or fitness center; that's better left to private enterprise ...

May 11, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• Congratulations to the high school seniors recently recognized as members of the All-County Academic Team. For 16 years Upchurch & Jowers Insurance Agency Inc. has honored a select group of students for their academic achievements. This year, 31 youth from Camden, North Central and Lugoff-Elgin high schools joined this team for excellence. Well done, students!

May 09, 2011 | | Editorials


Dog attacks

We were glad to see recently that a 10-year-old girl from Batesburg-Leesville near Columbia is making progress in recovering from an attack by a vicious pit bull in which the dog almost tore her right arm off. She has undergone a series of operations, according to news reports, and could have been killed on the day of the attack if a deputy had not responded quickly and killed the dog. According to that same report, since November there have been six separate violent incidents in South Carolina involving pit bulls, including two in which the victims died and four others ...

May 06, 2011 | | Editorials


The reality of free speech

Newspapers are generally in the forefront of free speech issues; along with trying to keep government meetings open and accessible to the public, first amendment rights usually are pretty sacrosanct in the newspaper business. Yet as the Supreme Court pondered the case of Kansas' Westboro Baptist Church a few weeks ago -- those are the kooks who show up at military funerals with all sorts of distasteful protest signs -- we had settled into a feeling of, "If the justices can find a way out of this without allowing those horrid people a right to spew their venom, we'll be fine ...

May 04, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• Anheuser-Busch, from its founding in the mid-19th century, has been an iconic American brand, its primary product being the industry behemoth Budweiser. For many, it was unfortunate when the company was sold in 2008 to Brazilian-Belgian brewing giant Inbev. It was recently revealed that August Busch IV, the last of the founding family to play an active role, is stepping down as a director, leaving a Busch-less company for the first time. In business, things change quickly, but it is nevertheless a bit sad to see this longtime company now without a member of its founding family.

May 02, 2011 | | Editorials


The future of PBS and NPR

We don't always agree with everything that Sen. Jim DeMint of South Carolina says. We like his conservative principles but sometimes think he's a little dogged, in that compromise is necessary to accomplish much in Washington. But there's one issue on which we're in total agreement with DeMint: it's time for public funding of the Public Broadcasting System and National Public Radio to end.

April 29, 2011 | | Editorials


Budget bust

For decades, presidential administrations have come up with budget figures that don't always jibe with those which are compiled by the Congressional Budget Office, the federal agency that provides budget information to Congress. Not surprisingly, White House spending and deficit figures usually differ on the optimistic side from those of the CBO, which takes a more rational, business-like and non-partisan view of spending in the United States.

April 27, 2011 | | Editorials


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Articles by Section - Editorials


Tax Time

With the April 15 tax filing deadline having past earlier this week, Kershaw County residents can breathe a sigh of relief – except for those who filed for an extension, of course. But a more important day, when it comes to your money, is Tax Freedom Day, which is the day the average South Carolina resident finally earns enough to pay his or her income tax bill. This year it was April 9; because of South Carolina's tax structure, which is lower than some states, Palmetto State residents pay their share earlier than the nation as a whole, which is ...

April 18, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Editorials


The Easter egg hunt mentality

Easter. Go ahead and let the word resonate in your mind. Let all the memories and fond associations come rushing over you. Easter is such a lovely holiday. The Biblical story behind it teaches people to be hopeful, that there is the possibility of redemption, unconditional love and eternal life. The natural season is a time of blooming and birth and renewal. The earth wakes up from its winter slumber and the air feels softer and warmer.

April 16, 2014 | Haley Atkinson | Editorials


Kudos to the UWKC

It was good to see dedicated volunteers and staff members recognized at last week's annual United Way of Kershaw County dinner. While there are many, many people who push together to make the United Way the superb organization that it is, a few special people were singled out for recognition. Dr. Frank Morgan, superintendent of the Kershaw County School District, received the Jake Watson Award, and Camden Deputy Fire Chief Phil Elliot was given the Anne Dallas Volunteer of the Year award. Other plaudits for volunteer efforts were given, and staff member Margaret Lawhorn was singled out for her ...

April 16, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Editorials


Noted and passed - April 14, 2014

• The news that the city of Camden plans to install an elevator at Camden City Hall is quite welcome. It is especially so to the city's disabled citizens who have found it difficult to come to court or attend Camden City Council meetings, both of which take place on the second floor. Many years ago, the city installed a chair-lift system attached to a railing of the building's main stairwell. It hasn't always worked and some people find its appearance a bit daunting. Installing the elevator -- which will also allow employees and visitors to reach offices and ...

April 14, 2014 | | Editorials


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