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Noted and passed

• Sen. Charles Schumer of New York, who never met a television camera he didn't like, didn't realize a microphone was turned on when he started dispensing advice to his Democratic colleagues on how to picture Republican policies as "extreme." Schumer's pointers give one indication of why everything is endlessly "spun" in Washington. Of course, it's not only Democrats who do this, as Republicans are just as guilty. But Schumer's the one who got caught; perhaps he'll check next time to make sure there's not a live microphone around.

April 04, 2011 | | Editorials


Carolina Cup

Many years ago, there was a Carolina Cup race director who insisted that every person in attendance was there to watch the horses run and that none of them were interested in the social aspects of the day -- or in taking a drink. That, of course, wasn't close to true, and there's a reason that the Cup has often been called the largest outdoor cocktail party in South Carolina. It is indeed a social occasion, and the consumption of alcoholic beverages has always played a part in its success. And yes, there always have been people who have ...

April 01, 2011 | | Editorials


Open government

The word "transparency" has become a popular one for politicians to use. After all, how many citizens are there here in Kershaw County -- or across South Carolina and the United States, for that matter -- who aren't in favor of a more open government? Not many. Indeed, transparency was one of the key platforms of Gov. Nikki Haley's campaign, and the issue no doubt contributed to her victory. A little squabble is now kicking up between her and State Treasurer Curtis Loftis over which is more committed to transparency and openness. Along with being amusing, it's also interesting.

March 30, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- March 28, 2011

• If ever a college coach deserved firing, it was Bruce Pearl, the Tennessee basketball head man who lied to NCAA investigators about recruiting violations he'd committed, and then committed additional illegal acts after denying he had done anything wrong in the first place. Pearl was a flamboyant coach who took the Volunteers to basketball heights they'd seldom attained, but his cheating was too flagrant to ignore.

March 28, 2011 | | Editorials


USC appointment

We commented last week on the puzzling decision that Gov. Nikki Haley made in not re-appointing Darla Moore to the University of South Carolina Board of Trustees. We still aren't clear why Haley chose to pick a fight with Moore and so many university alumni who are grateful for the $70 million pledge Moore has made to USC. But Sen. Jake Knott's intention to pass a new law opening another seat on the board, and then to have Moore run for it, isn't the proper way for legislators to express their disapproval.

March 25, 2011 | | Editorials


Athletes and education

Even the most casual sports fan in Kershaw County can get caught up in the hoopla of March Madness, the NCAA basketball tournament that is arguably the best sporting event in the country. It's difficult to understand how college sports officials can continue to resist a football play-off system when you consider the interest drawn by the hoops tourney each year. And in this year's games, there have been lots of down-to-the-wire contests, generating more excitement than ever before.

March 23, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• Kershaw County residents have a special reason to pull for Wofford's basketball team, as the Terriers are coached by Mike Young, who's married to the former Margaret Green, daughter of Davis and Gege Green of Camden. Young led Wofford to their second consecutive NCAA tournament appearance this year after winning the Southern Conference championship, with the Terriers making the "Big Dance" field despite being one of the smallest schools in the country to play Division I basketball. In the first round, Wofford played BYU valiantly before falling; nevertheless, it was another great season for Wofford and we offer ...

March 21, 2011 | | Editorials


Ousting Moore

Say what you will about Gov. Nikki Haley, but don't say one thing: that she's bashful.

March 18, 2011 | | Editorials


Righting the wrongs

In a perfect world -- in a political system that functioned more as our forefathers intended rather than how it actually does -- elected officials in Washington would take on issues based on the importance of those matters rather than how the politicians would be affected at the ballot box in their next re-election campaign. But, of course, it's not a perfect world, and sometimes lawmakers can be most productive when they can plow ahead without having to worry about repercussions at the voting booth.

March 16, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• We see through news reports that a sizeable percentage of newly elected U.S. Congressmen have decided to sleep in their offices, partly due to the high cost of real estate in the Washington area. That brings back memories. Rep. Ken Holland, formerly of Camden, was one of the first to become an "office snoozer" when he was elected to Congress from the Fifth Congressional District in 1974. Holland, a lawyer by profession, served eight years before leaving Washington -- one of the few who didn't become intoxicated with the power of Washington -- and now lives in Gaffney

March 14, 2011 | | Editorials


Fine -- no points

The state appears on the verge of legitimizing a traffic ticket system that has existed on the gray market for years in many municipalities -- writing tickets and collecting fines while not counting the violations against people's traffic records, thus saving them the higher insurance premiums that often result with speeding violations. A bill in the House of Representatives would allow police to write a warning ticket to speeders who are going less than 10 miles per hour over the limit, with the state and cities sharing the revenue.

March 11, 2011 | | Editorials


A new life for Mather

We all like to think that when we go to the polls to elect our leaders that we're casting our ballots for people who will make bold decisions; few voters ever mark the box next to the name of a candidate they consider timid. Camden City Council has indeed made some bold decisions recently, the latest one being to buy the former Mather Academy property, with the purpose of building a new recreational complex to take the place of the aging Rhame Arena.

March 09, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• It's difficult not to like the candor of Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey, the plain-spoken chief executive who's grappling with the Garden State's problems in a way that residents of that state have seldom seen. Christie lets the criticism of the media and special-interest groups roll off his back while he pile drives into the massive issues facing his state. Recently, Christie said he was not running for president but added that he knew he could win if he did. Few politicians are so bold or, as his critics say, brash. It will be interesting to ...

March 07, 2011 | | Editorials


Frank Buckles

The nation marked a milestone earlier this week when Frank Buckles of West Virginia, the last surviving U.S. World War I veteran, died at the age of 110. Buckles passed away peacefully, according to his daughter, and remained until the end somewhat bemused by his singular status as last survivor.

March 04, 2011 | | Editorials


Public unions

The drama that's been playing out for a couple weeks in Wisconsin over public sector unions has moved to Ohio, and it's almost certain that the issue of public unions isn't going away. While union membership has been declining for years in private business, that hasn't been the case with public unions; in 2009, for the first time in this country's history, a majority of unionized workers were in government jobs rather than private ones. And the percentages are even more striking: while only 7 percent of private workers are unionized, 36 percent of government ...

March 02, 2011 | | Editorials


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Articles by Section - Editorials


Cancer screening

We wrote recently of a change in the way KershawHealth is managing its emergency department, sending seriously threatened patients to one area for immediate, vital care while directing others who are less ill to be treated in a non-emergency system. It's cost-effective, but also provides quality care for both types of patients.

October 31, 2014 | | Editorials


Express Care

One of the problems with the expense of health care is the fact that many people tend to use a hospital's emergency room as their primary care facility, going there with normal ailments such as flu and severe colds. Emergency room care is expensive -- too costly to be used in that way. KershawHealth is no different than other hospitals in that regard, and the decision to "split" the emergency department there is a sound one.

October 29, 2014 | | Editorials


Your vote, your choice

Today, the Chronicle-Independent begins a series of articles summarizing the candidates and issues that will be on the Nov. 4 ballot, one week from Tuesday. Perhaps the most contentious race isn't between candidates but between "yes" and "no" on two referenda offered by the Kershaw County School District.

October 27, 2014 | | Editorials


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