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Noted and passed

• This month's award for poor taste goes to the Pima County (Arizona) Republican Party, which is planning to raffle off a gun like the one used to shoot Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. Our dim view of this has nothing to do with second amendment rights, but rather spotlights an exercise in poor judgment, given the tragedy that occurred in Rep. Giffords' district in January, in which a gunman killed six people and wounded 13 others.

September 12, 2011 | | Editorials


Four lawsuits and counting

The late comedian Lewis Grizzard, whose column appeared in this newspaper, was an oft-married guy who used to joke that there was a bumper sticker reading "Honk If You've Been Married To Lewis Grizzard." Taking a new tack on an old theme, we're going to start looking for stickers announcing, "Honk If You've Sued Sheriff Jim Matthews."

September 09, 2011 | | Editorials


Meeting minutes

We're glad to see that work sessions of Camden City Council will be recorded from this point on; the change was made after council member Willard Polk requested clarification on the state's Freedom of Information Act. Jay Bender, the pre-eminent FOI expert in South Carolina, said work sessions, even though official votes aren't taken, constitute a meeting under the statute's provisions and that such sessions should be subject to the law. City Attorney Charles Cushman had earlier opined that work sessions didn't fall under the purview of the state's FOI Act because they were ...

September 07, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• Actress Daryl Hannah and others were arrested last week in front of the White House during a sit-in to protest a new oil pipeline from Canada. The activists called for clean energy investments, instead. We doubt there's a single American who's not in favor of cleaner energy, but the clear reality is that the country can't meet its needs with high-tech energy. In fact, one recipient of a recent government loan guarantee of half a billion dollars, solar energy company Solyndra, declared bankruptcy last week. We can't object to the idealism of those who would like ...

September 05, 2011 | | Editorials


Hope on the Hill?

At last there's a hint of hope from Washington -- a tiny but palpable sign that just maybe, lawmakers are getting the message that people are weary of the logjam which prevents decent legislation from being passed. Democratic and Republican members of the Joint Select Committee On Deficit Reduction have agreed to name a longtime Senate staffer to assume the job of running the panel. The man they've chosen is Mark Prater, chief counsel for Republicans on the Senate Finance Committee. We're glad to see him named not because he's a member of the GOP but because ...

September 02, 2011 | | Editorials


Hurricane Irene

With Hurricane Irene having come and gone, and with Kershaw County and South Carolina having been spared, the second-guessers in other parts of the country are coming out of the woodwork. When it comes to hindsight, there's perhaps no area more fertile than weather -- specifically, severe storms. It's easy to assess blame after the fact, whether it's for lack of preparedness or over-reaction, and there is no shortage of people who are willing to do so.

August 31, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• We're glad to see Camden native Larry Doby honored with a postage stamp in his honor, one of four Major League baseball players to be so recognized; Joe DiMaggio, the Yankee Clipper, is another, and the final two have yet to be chosen. Doby was the first black player in the American League and carved out an enviable career record. He died in 2003.

August 29, 2011 | | Editorials


Too much Harpootlian

Dick Harpootlian, chairman of the S.C. Democratic Party, used to be an engaging figure, what we in the newspaper business called "good copy." Now Harpootlian's more of a loud bore. His latest rant involves his excoriation of Gov. Nikki Haley for hiring campaign staffers for high-paying government jobs, which is exactly what Democratic governors have also done. Harpootlian basically says it was all right for Dems to do that, but it's not OK for Haley because she said she was going to be a different kind of governor.

August 26, 2011 | | Editorials


Washington double-speak

Ernest F. Hollings served decades in the U.S. Senate from South Carolina, and he was one of those who were in Washington during a time when politicians from both parties were still willing to step across the aisle and compromise. That seems long ago. But Hollings, despite decades in Washington, never lost his penchant for picturing himself as an outsider. In speeches to Rotary clubs and other organizations across the Palmetto State, he railed against "those boys up in Washington," as if he had never stepped foot in the nation's capital.

August 24, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• "Spin" has become an inexorable part of the political process, and if you hear President Obama tell it, his bus tour through Iowa isn't a campaign trip, saying instead that it's a way to take the pulse of the country. But it has all the trappings of a political hoorah, and of course that's what it is. We're not blaming the president for that, only noticing that when it comes to spin, the White House is as accomplished at it as any politician at any level.

August 22, 2011 | | Editorials


Rick Perry

Texas Gov. Rick Perry quickly discovered that national politics is a whole different game than statewide politics -- even in as huge a place as the Lone Star State -- shortly after he formally announced his presidential candidacy in South Carolina. Perry said Ben Bernanke, chairman of the Federal Reserve, was acting in a "treasonous" way with national monetary policy. He also said that were Bernanke down in Texas, he'd be treated "pretty ugly" because of his job performance.

August 19, 2011 | | Editorials


The real picture

For many families here in Kershaw County, all this talk about the federal budget and the national debt involves numbers so huge as to be inexplicable. Families think in thousands of dollars, while the government thinks in trillions. Someone passed along to us recently one of those missives that make their way around the country, and unlike many such messages with their wild inaccuracies, the figures in it are a pretty valid picture of what's going on in America. Consider:

August 17, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• Recent Wisconsin recall elections spurred by people dissatisfied with Republican efforts to downsize government and diminish the role of unions in politics failed to wrest control away from the GOP in that state. A record amount of money was spent in the normally liberal state but Democrats failed to achieve their goal of unseating at least three of the six state senators who were being recalled. Some experts say that sends a national message.

August 15, 2011 | | Editorials


Debt crisis

It's a sad sign that a committee of 12 has had to be appointed to try to deal with the debt crisis in America, the result of Congress' inability to move the country forward during these trying times. The Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, composed of six Democrats and six Republicans, is charged with devising a plan to reduce the deficit by $1.5 trillion over the next 10 years, and if it fails, then automatic cuts are to take place. We recall that the last time such a committee was formed, headed by Democrat Erskine Bowles and ...

August 12, 2011 | | Editorials


City boards and commissions

Camden City Council is wise to consider the role and development of city boards and commissions, and an overall restructuring of the process would be a good idea. City Manager Kevin Bronson, at council's last meeting, laid down several guidelines that should be followed in appointing boards and commissions, all of which made sense. But it was an off-hand remark by Council member Walter Long that perhaps was most cogent of all -- that the city is not receiving minutes from some boards because they aren't meeting regularly. And therein lies a premise: that the city doesn't need ...

August 10, 2011 | | Editorials


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Articles by Section - Editorials


Editorial: An eyesore

In the most recent installment of our "Is Kershaw County being left behind?" series of articles on economic development, we looked at some non-industrial pieces of the puzzle. One highly visible sign of economic health in a community -- successful or poor -- is the number of active storefronts, whether individual buildings or as part of shopping centers.

April 27, 2015 | | Editorials


Editorial: Social Security

Lawmakers in Washington have long ignored the fact that the Social Security system in this country is broken. On the brink of insolvency, Social Security needs major revamping, whether it comes in the form of benefit reductions, tax increases or both. Congress has refused to consider benefit cuts decades out in the future, even for young adults who are just now starting to pay into the system. They are turning their backs on such simple fixes as delaying the age by a year or two at which people can start receiving their monthly allotments. Bear in mind, we aren't ...

April 24, 2015 | | Editorials


Editorial: GOP needs to broaden appeal

The Republican presidential field is already getting crowded, and the South Carolina GOP primary is often viewed as a bellwether for White House hopefuls. Because this is a conservative state, candidates in past years have often moved to the right while campaigning here. But a new poll shows Republican voters in South Carolina might be moving away from some of the hard-line social issues they have embraced in the past. As a side note, many political observers believe the party "had better get out of people's bedrooms if it wants to broaden its appeal."

April 22, 2015 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - April 20, 2015

• Last week's seizure by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) of Old Armory Steak & Seafood on Rutledge Street marks at least the temporary loss of one of Camden and Kershaw County's premier restaurants. It is an unfortunate blow to the downtown Camden economy. Each business provides potential traffic to another and the loss of any one diminishes such beneficial ripple effects. Locals cheered the Old Armory's opening in 2006 so soon after the closing of the previous tenant, The Paddock. Many people and businesses have celebrated the holidays, proms, anniversaries, engagements, weddings, birthdays and more at the Old ...

April 20, 2015 | | Editorials


Editorial: Jordan Spieth

With Augusta being only a couple hours away from Kershaw County, the Masters golf tournament holds a great deal of allure for this area. The azaleas at Augusta National are famous for their popping colors and their beauty, but they're no prettier than those which are currently at their peak in Camden, we might add. But there's something magical about the Masters, which is ranked by many players as the one tournament they'd like to win more than any other.

April 17, 2015 | | Editorials


Editorial: Improving the city

There have been many great additions to the Camden landscape in recent years -- to name a few, the statues of Joseph Kershaw and King Haiglar at the Town Green; the Bernard Baruch and Larry Doby statuary at the Camden Archives; and the new pocket park where the former Maxway building stood. All these have added to the town's appearance and ambience.

April 15, 2015 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - April 13, 2015

• Congratulations to Johnny Deal and Richard Walkirch for receiving, respectively, the United Way of Kershaw County's Jake Watson and Ann Dallas awards. Deal, often known as "Mr. Camden" or "Mr. Facebook" around town, is one of many people's favorite personalities. That doesn't necessarily win you awards. What does is a commitment to community involvement, which Deal has in spades, working with the Camden Jaycees, Kershaw County Chamber of Commerce, Community Medical Clinic, Fine Arts Center of Kershaw County, the United Way and more. As for volunteerism, we can't imagine a more worthy recipient for the Dallas ...

April 13, 2015 | | Editorials


Editorial: Fringe groups

We're not too high on elected officials who hew to positions on the fringes. Like many, we believe adherence to strict political philosophies is one of the primary reasons for the polarization in American politics today. There just aren't many lawmakers in Washington today who are willing to sit down and work things out despite their political differences, as there were for decades.

April 10, 2015 | | Editorials


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