View Mobile Site

Archive By Section - Editorials


Borking

The recent death of Robert Bork no doubt brought memories for many Kershaw County residents who recall his 1987 nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court and the vicious attacks on him that led to a new word -- "borking" -- being added to the dictionary. As columnist Gordon Crovitz related in a recent piece, Bork's treatment by the U.S. Senate was the first in what has become a normal procedure, that of trying to demonize court appointees who don't meet a certain political standard. Up until that time, presidents enjoyed the power to appoint justices with a great ...

January 02, 2013 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Dec. 31, 2012

• If you plan to watch the ball drop in Times Square on New Year's Eve, you'll probably catch a glimpse of One Times Square, an office building that is mostly vacant. But don't shed tears for the building's owners; according to The Wall Street Journal, the building will generate more than $23 million in revenue this year as a spot to hang billboards and other advertisements. Its clients include Anheuser-Busch, which will pony up $3.4 million to for beer signs, and Dunkin Donuts, which is paying $3.6 million to feature its goodies.

December 31, 2012 | | Editorials


Gun control

As the gun debate has mounted following the tragic school shootings in Connecticut, many who have strong opinions are speaking out -- some who favor a total ban on guns, others who prefer no controls whatsoever. But there's no easy solution to this problem, and the best one lies somewhere in the middle of the two extremes.

December 28, 2012 | | Editorials


FOIA bill

Almost any reasonable measure which makes government more open and accessible to South Carolinians is good, so we're glad to see Rep. Bill Taylor once again offering a bill that would prohibit tax-supported agencies from charging excessive fees for providing documents and would require them to respond more quickly to public requests for information.

December 26, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Dec. 24, 2012

• As you settle back to enjoy holiday football, we have a startling statistic for you regarding the size of college football players. A recent survey which focused on linemen over seven decades revealed the average lineman today weighs more than half again as much as his 1950 counterpart. Over that time, according to a recent news report, the average offensive and defensive lineman grew to just over 290 pounds from just above 190. We can't even predict how big they'll be in another 50 years.

December 24, 2012 | | Editorials


Christmas

Most of us here in Kershaw County are caught up in the hustle and bustle of the holiday season -- shopping, family gatherings, baking and all the other traditions of Christmas. And there's nothing wrong with that. But as we observe a holy day of Christendom, let us pause to recall the true meaning of the season, as related in the second chapter of Luke, from the King James Version of the New Testament.

December 21, 2012 | | Editorials


Tim Scott

Rep. Tim Scott became the immediate front-runner to succeed Sen. Jim DeMint of South Carolina after DeMint announced he would resign to run the Heritage Foundation, perhaps the pre-eminent conservative think tank in the country. (As an aside, we've seen lots of philosophical mumbo-jumbo come out of think tanks, both conservative and liberal, but very little workable policy.) Other names were bandied about, the strangest one being Jenny Sanford, former wife of the Palmetto State's philandering ex-governor, Mark Sanford.

December 19, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Dec. 17, 2012

• We've commented before on the merry-go-round of coaches in professional sports, and that some who get fired manage to get new jobs no matter how bad their teams have been in the past. A news story pointed out recently that Norv Turner, coach of the NFL's San Diego Chargers, has managed to coach 234 games while compiling an overall losing record. Now that's what we call a survivor.

December 17, 2012 | | Editorials


Look in the mirror

While President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner continue negotiations in an attempt to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff, Americans across the country -- including, of course, many right here in Kershaw County -- are voicing their concerns about the irresponsibility of the federal government. But surveys of voters show a curious trend, and if we Americans want to look at one cause of the huge national debt and the dysfunction of Uncle Sam, we need look no further than ourselves.

December 14, 2012 | | Editorials


Inflation

The U.S. government has never been known for efficiency, as indicated by the staggering amount of red ink under which Uncle Sam is struggling. And there's no easy way to reconcile changes that will bring the deficit under control. But there's one action that's extremely simple and effective: changing the way the government measures inflation, which affects how fast government payments rise under a variety of programs.

December 12, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Dec. 10, 2012

• Little noticed last week among all the "fiscal cliff" talk was the death of former Rep. Congressman Jack Brooks of Texas, who spent 42 years in Washington and is perhaps best remembered as the man standing behind Jacqueline Kennedy as Lyndon Johnson took the presidential oath of office aboard Air Force One following the assassination of President Kennedy. Brooks was one of a kind -- described in one news story as an "irascible, cigar-chomping … swashbuckling Texas character" and by one Johnson aide as one of the only men LBJ was ever afraid of." Brooks came from a different era, but he ...

December 10, 2012 | | Editorials


GOP must change

Nobody here in Kershaw County or anywhere else in the country would rationally assert that President Obama's victory last month transformed the United States into a one-party country. After all, Obama won by a skinny percentage (though by a wider margin in the antiquated Electoral College), and the U.S. House of Representatives is still controlled by the GOP, as are a majority of governorships. However, the protocols of presidential politics are creating a more difficult path for Republicans to win the White House unless the party steps back and takes a fresh look at itself.

December 07, 2012 | | Editorials


Hillary Clinton

There's an old saying that a cat has nine lives, but in politics, there's probably nobody who has more lives than Hillary Rodham Clinton. It's a measure of her resilience that as she completes four years as secretary of state in the Obama administration and prepares to step down from that post, her popularity is high, even among many who considered her almost the devil incarnate for a long while.

December 05, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Dec. 3, 2012

• There's a legitimate reason many Republican lawmakers in Washington oppose the potential nomination of Susan Rice as secretary of state. There are too many unanswered questions about her statements following the attack on the U. S. embassy in Benghazi, Libya. Many in the GOP say they'd be more comfortable with Sen. John Kerry, who ran unsuccessfully for president in 2004. Kerry has long years of experience and significant expertise in foreign affairs. Unless President Obama simply enjoys picking fights, he'd do well to go with Kerry.

December 03, 2012 | | Editorials


Two-way street

We've been whacking national Republicans pretty hard lately. They lost the presidential election by appearing to be completely out of touch with the majority of voters. They have been the image of obstinacy, acting as if they are still operating in a cloakroom of darkness. Even Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina has said the party is running out of angry old white men and had better change its ways.

November 30, 2012 | | Editorials


« First  « Prev  16 17 18 19 20  Next »  Last »

Page 18 of 41

Articles by Section - Editorials


The Harrell case

It was another black eye for South Carolina last week when Rep. Bobby Harrell, speaker of the House of Representatives, was indicted by a Richland County grand jury on nine counts, including illegally using campaign money for personal expenses, filing false campaign disclosures and misconduct in office. Harrell suspended himself -- how's that for an oddity? -- and will now face his government accusers. South Carolina certainly doesn't have a monopoly on political malfeasance but the Palmetto State has had more than its share of governmental scandal. We say that fully recognizing that Harrell is innocent until proven guilty.

September 17, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Sept. 15, 2014

• What a boon the S.C. Equine Park has been for Camden and Kershaw County! And now, with word that a second, larger covered arena will be built -- possibly as soon as this winter -- the park should ultimately bring even more people to the area than it already does. Think on this: even with the arena already in place, the equine park has been booked an average of 30 weekends each year, with an economic impact of $4 million. Imagine if, with the second arena, the park could be booked 45 or even 50 weekends each year. How much would ...

September 15, 2014 | | Editorials


Elgin’s spirit

Elgin is certainly not the same community that it was a few decades ago. The sleepy little crossroads that existed then has now become the primary growth area in Kershaw County, with housing developments having sprung up all over West Wateree. The area is populated not only with citizens who were born and raised in Kershaw County but many who have moved across the county line from neighboring Richland County, and others who have found their way there from throughout the United States.

September 12, 2014 | | Editorials


1

Page 1 of 1


Contents of this site are © Copyright 2014 Chronicle Independent All rights reserved. Privacy policy and Terms of service

Powered by
Morris Technology
Please wait ...