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Noted and passed - Aug. 25, 2014

• Every now and then a story just makes you want to puff up with pride. We had one Wednesday, and we'll have another this Wednesday, both on the same subject: the renaming of the I-20 bridge over the Wateree River for Kershaw County's three medal of honor winners. Richmond Hobson Hilton, John C. Villepigue and Donald Leroy Truesdell are heroes out of history in no uncertain terms. In our preview story, readers learned that Hilton charged gunners firing at his squad, firing until his ammunition was spent, killing six enemies and capturing 10, but lost an arm as ...

August 25, 2014 | | Editorials


Alaska politics

One of the things that keeps many people interested in politics is the fact that big decisions can turn on little details. Such is the case with control of the United States Senate in the upcoming election; Republicans want to gain six seats so they'll have a majority in both the Senate and House, while Democrats, even though they understand they probably will lose some seats, want desperately to prevent a GOP majority. The entire deal -- which party, in effect, controls the government in Washington -- could come down to Alaska, the least densely populated state in the nation. With ...

August 22, 2014 | | Editorials


Workforce act doesn’t work

The unemployment rate here in Kershaw County and across South Carolina, as well as the rest of the United States, remains disappointingly high. The economy is still mired in slow growth, and too many people are out of work. Yet a recent study by a national newspaper shows how ineffective government jobs programs can be and points out that many people who have tried to take advantage of them end up worse off than they were before starting them.

August 20, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Aug. 18, 2014

• Here in Kershaw County, we don't think about bridges much, unless it's the spans crossing the Lynches and Wateree rivers on U.S. 1, I-20 and other roads. Many bridges in our county are small, made of wood or pipes used as culverts. They cross streams and branches of creeks and -- according to our recent two-part story -- not in the greatest shape. Some state-owned bridges are in the process of being repaired or replaced with state and/or federal funds. But many others are owned by the county. All but two currently open bridges that cross bodies of ...

August 18, 2014 | | Editorials


Fighting two diseases

Two horrific diseases have been brought into the spotlight recently -- ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, which has caught the public eye through an "ice bucket challenge," and depression, brought into further consciousness through the tragic suicide of actor/comedian Robin Williams. Attention in such matters is always beneficial, both in terms of raising money to fight the diseases and in making Americans more aware of the challenges of such maladies.

August 15, 2014 | | Editorials


Candidate Clinton?

If there was doubt about whether Hillary Clinton will jump into the 2016 presidential race, it was largely dispelled earlier this week when she conducted a wide-ranging interview in which she spelled out many of her foreign-policy differences with President Obama, who was her boss until she stepped down as secretary of state 19 months ago. During her tenure at the State Department, Clinton remained a loyal soldier, though she now reveals she didn't enthusiastically support all the initiatives that were required of her by Obama.

August 13, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Aug. 11, 2014

• The death of a soldier is never easy to take and yet the fact that soldiers can die in battle or when otherwise in harm's way is an inevitable fact of military life. In today's world, however, when we hear about the death of a general it is usually after they have retired from serving their country. So, it was surprising and upsetting to hear that U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene died last week after being shot in a "lone gunman" attack at a training facility in Afghanistan. According to the Army, Greene was serving ...

August 11, 2014 | | Editorials


Smoking pleasure?

If you don't believe that studies can show virtually any result, you need look no further than a new segment in the federal government's hefty new tobacco regulations showing that the health benefits of quitting smoking have to be largely discounted because of the loss of pleasure that smokers suffer when they kick the habit. Huh?

August 08, 2014 | | Editorials


A fine man

The death of James S. Brady earlier this week marked the end of a decades-long saga of courage and dedication; the former presidential press secretary for Ronald Reagan lived more than 33 years after taking a bullet that was intended for the president. Brady was brutally wounded in Washington when a deranged John W. Hinckley Jr. fired a pistol, hoping his false bravado would impress the movie actress Jodie Foster. Reagan came perilously close to dying, but fully recovered; unfortunately, Brady was dogged by pain and disability for the rest of his life.

August 06, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Aug. 4, 2014

• For more than a century, KershawHealth's underlying mission has been to provide quality healthcare to all citizens of Kershaw County regardless of socioeconomic status. In other words, at least partially, it provides charity care to those who cannot otherwise afford to pay for hospital services. Currently, KershawHealth allows people whose household income reaches 200 percent of federal poverty guidelines (FPG) to receive a 100 percent discount on their hospital bill. Those up to 300 percent FPG get a 75 percent discount; 400 percent FPG, 50 percent. KershawHealth administrators now propose cutting off any financial assistance at 133 percent FPG ...

August 04, 2014 | | Editorials


Spurrier v. Swinney

Everyone knows that when it comes to sports, football reigns supreme here in Kershaw County and South Carolina. Whereas basketball might be the top sport in neighboring North Carolina, it's a distant second -- or probably even third -- here in the Palmetto State. And these are heady times for gridiron enthusiasts of both the University of South Carolina and Clemson; both teams have enjoyed success in the past few seasons, and that momentum has carried over into recruiting, in which both schools are piling up classes that are among the nation's best.

August 01, 2014 | | Editorials


Negative ads

Kershaw County residents are getting ready to face what other voters across the country are going to see in the next few months: an onslaught of political ads, many of them nasty in character, and a high percentage of them paid for not by candidates but by special interest groups which have amassed millions upon millions of dollars to spread their messages. And, of course, the bulk of those messages will be negative. These groups are both Democratic and Republican, conservative and liberal. Altogether, according to news reports, such factions are going to buy $2 billion worth of ad time ...

July 30, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - July 28, 2014

• Friday's report that Amtrak is going to spend the next several months refurbishing Camden's passenger rail station off West DeKalb Street is welcome news. Built in 1937, it has shown its age for decades and never more so than now with holes in the platform's canopy, rotting timbers and other problems that make it a less than desirable place to stop. Amtrak says their No. 1 priority is making the facility Americans with Disabilities Act compliant -- and that's a very good thing -- from the parking lot to the station and onto the platform and train. But ...

July 28, 2014 | | Editorials


Rhame Arena

We're glad to see that the city of Camden is exploring alternatives for aging Rhame Arena. The building is becoming more dilapidated with each passing year, and something needs to be done, whether it's razing it or restoring it. Of course, money is a factor, just as it is in all government decisions these days. We will say that city officials have overworked the bureaucratic jargon in their appraisal of the situation, saying an "adaptive reuse" could be a possible alternative. We are assuming "adaptive reuse" means repairing the building and making it feasible for some type of ...

July 25, 2014 | | Editorials


A disturbing trend

We wrote recently of the disturbing trend in the White House of spinning every issue through press spokesmen rather than engaging in open questioning about issues of interest to Americans. A lack of transparency isn't limited to the federal government, as the S.C. Supreme Court has recently issued two troubling rulings which limit public access in the Palmetto State.

July 23, 2014 | | Editorials


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Page 4 of 44

Articles by Section - Editorials


Editorial: Court decisions

Two prominent decisions in South Carolina courts this week have been just and fair -- exactly the way most people would like to see the legal system work. The first was a decision by Circuit Court Judge Carmen Mullen to overturn the 1944 conviction of a 14-year-old boy who was sent to the electric chair back in the Jim Crow days of this state for the murder of two girls.

December 19, 2014 | | Editorials


Editorial: Police officers

With police behavior having been in the news recently because of incidents in which white officers killed unarmed black citizens, there has been much discussion -- rightfully so -- about whether some officers are acting recklessly. Racial profiling, of course, has been a part of this discussion, as it should be. It's interesting, then, that the U.S. Supreme Court handed down an opinion earlier this week giving some leeway to police who make "reasonable mistakes" in enforcing the law. Of course, reasonable mistakes don't include the right by officers to act without provocation or to use undue force. And ...

December 17, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Dec. 15, 2014

• A tip of the C-I hat to Kershaw County Deputy Fred Tiah, a school resource officer at Stover Middle School in Elgin. Tiah, as we reported Friday, is from Liberia, one of the hardest-hit countries in this year's Ebola crisis. Recognizing he has been welcomed to and is finding success in America, Tiah says he wants to help children in his native country who have been orphaned by the deadly disease. He's put his idea into action, raising money to help pay for the children's education and medical supplies. Tiah also wants to be a role model ...

December 15, 2014 | | Editorials


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