View Mobile Site

Archive By Section - Editorials


Debate

We doubt that many Kershaw County residents are waiting in breathless anticipation for the presidential debate tonight. After all, mirroring the normal path of politics over the last few years, this year's contest between President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney has been more of a mud-wrestling contest than a serious forum over the many difficult issues facing the United States.

October 03, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Oct. 1, 2012

• Singer Andy Williams, who died last week at the age of 84, had one of those soothing voices that left people feeling better about everything. His signature song, "Moon River," came from the 1961 movie "Breakfast At Tiffany's" and carried him to stardom, though he had many other hits. He was one of the original acts in Branson, Mo., and performed until shortly before his death. He will be missed in the music world.

October 01, 2012 | | Editorials


Football refs

People here in Kershaw County and South Carolina take their football seriously. Though the Carolina Panthers are based in nearby Charlotte, the college game still reigns supreme here, but Sunday afternoons still attract plenty of fans who like to watch the National Football League games. Some of those contests have been thrown into disarray by substitute officials who have taken the place of the league's regular officials, who were locked out by team owners in a labor dispute.

September 28, 2012 | | Editorials


Voter ID

In a day when Democrats and Republicans will argue about what color the sky is or whether the wind blows, the latest controversy comes along with South Carolina's new voter registration statutes, which have been challenged by U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, who says the move could disenfranchise black voters. The S.C. law would require voters to show at least one kind of proper identification, something that Palmetto voters did for years. But opponents say requiring such a measure would punish people who don't have ready access to such documents.

September 26, 2012 | | Editorials


Vindication?

Few crimes have attracted the attention and fascination of the public like the gruesome 1970 murder of an Army wife and her two young daughters at Fort Bragg, N.C.; the husband and father, Capt. Jeffrey McDonald, a Green Beret physician, was subsequently convicted of the murders and has been in prison since 1979. For all these years he has maintained his innocence, claiming the murders were committed by four mysterious people who invaded his army post home, stabbed him and killed his family during a drug-induced rampage.

September 21, 2012 | | Editorials


Breaking partisanship

As President Obama and Mitt Romney batter each other and each other's parties ad nauseum, voters in Kershaw County and across the country continue to be subjected to the same bitter partisanship that keeps Congress and the White House from getting much achieved. In fact, we were struck by another newspaper's recent focus on a book entitled "The Parties Versus The People," by former U.S. Rep. Mickey Edwards, a Republican of Oklahoma. "We have to reclaim our democracy, not from an invading army but from the parasitic destruction waged in the name of partisan interest," Edwards wrote.

September 19, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Sept. 17, 2012

• As the teachers' strike unfolded in Chicago and protesting educators swarmed city streets, we watched with interest as one teacher explained, with a straight face, why they were going out on strike. "We want to make sure all the children in Chicago get the kind of education they deserve," he said. We've noticed that whatever the location, teachers who shut down schools always mouth the party line that they are doing it for the kids and not for themselves. We hope nobody actually believes that.

September 17, 2012 | | Editorials


Notre Dame, ACC

College athletics has become too big and too important, a behemoth that sometimes seems to control the academic process rather than the other way around. But that is what it has come to, and with the huge amounts of money being tossed around for TV rights to college football and basketball games, it's hard to see it going the other way.

September 14, 2012 | | Editorials


85 mph

Don't be surprised if some member of the S.C. General Assembly reads of the new 85-mile-an-hour speed limit in Texas and decides that would be a good idea for the Palmetto State. We hope that won't happen, but we'll never be flabbergasted at any proposal that includes a higher driving speed, which to some lawmakers equates with motherhood and apple pie.

September 12, 2012 | | Editorials


Note and passed - Sept. 10, 2010

• Penn State pedophile Jerry Sandusky says he regrets not testifying at his child sex-abuse trial earlier this year. Sandusky, who's awaiting sentencing after being convicted of multiple counts of abusing young boys, still maintains his innocence despite crushing evidence against him and the testimony of several of his victims. Sandusky isn't likely to convince anyone that he's innocent.

September 10, 2012 | | Editorials


Harpootlian

Democrats in South Carolina have every right to criticize Gov. Nikki Haley. Even from many in her own party, she gets low marks for her governing style, which has tended to alienate many. Of course, some of that alienation has come among members of the Republican-controlled General Assembly who are loathe to cede any additional power to a governor -- any governor -- because it might lessen their authority.

September 07, 2012 | | Editorials


‘Four years ago’

Kershaw County residents with long political memories might recall the 1980 Democratic presidential campaign, when Sen. Ted Kennedy challenged incumbent President Jimmy Carter for the party's nomination. On a television interview, Kennedy was asked why he wanted to be president, which should have been a political softball for him. Instead, he stumbled and bumbled, never really delivering a decent answer, and it was the beginning of the end for his campaign.

September 05, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Sept. 3, 2012

• Bad news seems to arrive in clumps when it comes to climate change, and the latest findings about sea ice in the Arctic are bleak; the ice level there has shrunk to its lowest level on record. A diminishing ice sheet has all sorts of unpleasant implications for the future, including exacerbating the warming of the atmosphere. Few people have answers, but no longer is there much question about whether global warming is taking place.

September 03, 2012 | | Editorials


KershawHealth

A KershawHealth accreditation survey that reflects "the most favorable results I have seen in my many years as a healthcare CEO," according to chief executive Donnie Weeks, is a positive sign for KershawHealth during a period of financial turmoil. The hospital's financial struggles (as have those of many hospitals) have been well documented over the last couple years as the economy has taken a toll on elective surgeries and other procedures, so KershawHealth was in need of some good news.

August 31, 2012 | | Editorials


The LWA

Community organizations come and go, often beginning vigorously and then sliding steadily downhill as the enthusiasm of members wanes. In many instances, they're formed for a specific purpose -- to advocate a cause or to oppose a particular proposal, or to generate community support for something viewed as especially beneficial. The Lake Wateree Association (LWA), in contrast, has not only survived but thrived for decades, driven by those who live on the lake or enjoy the many benefits it offers. Founded as the Lake Wateree Homeowners Association, the LWA continues to offer not only a way for lake lovers to ...

August 29, 2012 | | Editorials


« First  « Prev  17 18 19 20 21  Next »  Last »

Page 19 of 40

Articles by Section - Editorials


Noted and passed - July 28, 2014

• Friday's report that Amtrak is going to spend the next several months refurbishing Camden's passenger rail station off West DeKalb Street is welcome news. Built in 1937, it has shown its age for decades and never more so than now with holes in the platform's canopy, rotting timbers and other problems that make it a less than desirable place to stop. Amtrak says their No. 1 priority is making the facility Americans with Disabilities Act compliant -- and that's a very good thing -- from the parking lot to the station and onto the platform and train. But ...

July 28, 2014 | | Editorials


Rhame Arena

We're glad to see that the city of Camden is exploring alternatives for aging Rhame Arena. The building is becoming more dilapidated with each passing year, and something needs to be done, whether it's razing it or restoring it. Of course, money is a factor, just as it is in all government decisions these days. We will say that city officials have overworked the bureaucratic jargon in their appraisal of the situation, saying an "adaptive reuse" could be a possible alternative. We are assuming "adaptive reuse" means repairing the building and making it feasible for some type of ...

July 25, 2014 | | Editorials


A disturbing trend

We wrote recently of the disturbing trend in the White House of spinning every issue through press spokesmen rather than engaging in open questioning about issues of interest to Americans. A lack of transparency isn't limited to the federal government, as the S.C. Supreme Court has recently issued two troubling rulings which limit public access in the Palmetto State.

July 23, 2014 | | Editorials


1

Page 1 of 1


Contents of this site are © Copyright 2014 Chronicle Independent All rights reserved. Privacy policy and Terms of service

Powered by
Morris Technology
Please wait ...