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Noted and passed -- Dec. 26, 2011

• We've watched with interest the controversy over the city of Camden's proposed YMCA, and the attendant give and take on both sides. City officials certainly could have been more receptive to those disagreeing with their positions, and some of the opponents could have been more circumspect with their jeers and boos at meetings. But the ongoing debate has been a healthy exercise in democracy and the right of both governing and dissenting. However, we were disappointed to see Y opponent Herb Farber characterize Mayor Jeffrey Graham in a recent news story as a "29-year-old boy." The statement came ...

December 26, 2011 | | Editorials


A wish for peace

As we celebrate Christendom's holiest day on Sunday, let us pause to wish a peaceful season to all in Kershaw County -- those who share Christianity, those who subscribe to other faiths and those who have no faith at all. And to the family of believers, we print once again the words from the second chapter of Luke that have come to be the basis of faith for so many millions of people across the United States and the world:

December 23, 2011 | | Editorials


Medicare

With the U.S. budget deficit still spiraling amid partisan stagnation and deadlock in Washington, two lawmakers, one a Republican and the other a Democrat, have finally come together to advance a proposal that would revamp the runaway costs of Medicare. Though solons in the nation's capital have refused thus far to address entitlement spending -- there's no way to bring the budget under control without changes to both Medicare and Social Security -- perhaps this is a ray of hope that there are some people in Washington who are willing to work together to salvage the fiscal integrity of ...

December 21, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- Dec. 19, 2011

• We observed last week that Republican candidates for president had no reason to subject themselves to a debate moderated by Donald Trump, who has continually threatened to run for the White House himself. They all apparently decided the same thing, and the debate has now been cancelled. Trump, meanwhile, says he's keeping his options open to mount a third-party presidential bid. If he does, we predict it will be met with the same lack of enthusiasm as his proposed debate.

December 19, 2011 | | Editorials


Public pensions

Public pensions have been much in the news since the economic downturn began, especially during the last year. The battle in Wisconsin over public employees' collective bargaining rights and pension plans has been the most publicized, but the same arguments have been occurring across the country. The South Carolina General Assembly has now taken the first step to deal with a $13-billion deficit in the state retirement pension fund, and though it involved difficult decisions on the part of a House subcommittee, it was the right thing to do. The recommendations still must go to the House Ways and Means ...

December 16, 2011 | | Editorials


Gingrich

Of all the presidential candidates, nobody was more a "dead man walking" than Newt Gingrich, the former U.S. House Speaker whose staff deserted him early in the campaign and who was left for dead by voters and the media. But he has been revived in the turbulent Republican race for the White House nomination and polls now show him leading his rivals in Iowa and South Carolina, and even in New Hampshire, where Mitt Romney is almost a neighbor. Ironically, it is Gingrich's ability to stand up and take the heat for his past conduct that is helping ...

December 14, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed for Dec. 12, 2011

• No matter how you feel about Tiger Woods -- it's a bit hard for us to pull for him given all the revelations about him -- one thing is clear: golf is more exciting with him. His win last Sunday at the Chevron Challenge, in which he birdied the final two holes to claim victory by a shot, was his first in two years. It'll be interesting to see how he does next year, and whether he can resume his chase of Jack Nicklaus' record number of victories in major championships, but as long as he's competitive there will ...

December 12, 2011 | Martin L. Cahn | Editorials


Changing opinion, not 'flip-flopping'

The term "flip-flop" has come to be one of the most caustic charges that can be thrown at a political candidate, and rightly so. It's hard to like a candidate who appears to bend his views to suit whichever audience he's addressing, and candidates who insist on taking one position one day and another the next day don't appear to be serious. But sometimes we as voters and political observers take this position to an extreme, pushing people into never changing their positions lest they be termed flip-floppers.

December 09, 2011 | | Editorials


Trump a liability

Decades ago, comedian/storyteller Will Rogers said of politics, "I don't belong to any organized party. I'm a Democrat." That same philosophy could be used to describe the decision of the Republican Party to let Donald Trump moderate a Dec. 27 debate among GOP White House hopefuls. Trump, who still says he's pondering a presidential run should none of the current crop of candidates exhibit the ability to defeat President Obama next November, has no business injecting himself in such a debate, but more importantly, the Republican Party has no business allowing him to do so.

December 07, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• Rep. Barney Frank has been one of the most unabashed liberals in Congress for more than 30 years, advocating all things left and marking business -- nearly any kind of business -- as the enemy of the people. Frank now says he won't run for another term, saying redistricting will put him at a disadvantage. The Massachusetts Democrat is well-known for his irascible nature, and during campaigns, his aides often tried to keep him away from voters, knowing he would offend them with his personality. The New York Times reported, "Those who admire him say Mr. Frank served up his sourness ...

December 05, 2011 | | Editorials


The cuts to come

Rep. Jim Clyburn of South Carolina, who was one of 12 members of the so-called Super Committee which recently failed to reach an agreement on deficit reduction, says he opposes the automatic spending cuts which are scheduled to occur because of the committee's failure. The automatic decreases in spending were intended as a sword over the committee's head to make sure the dozen members came together in compromise to do what was best for the country. They -- six Republicans and six Democrats -- didn't do that, and now Clyburn wants to change the rules.

December 02, 2011 | | Editorials


Cain and Gingrich

Voters in this country are notoriously fickle -- even more so than football fans, and evidence of that can be found in the up-and-down nature of regular polls conducted to see which Republican presidential candidate is doing best. Each week it seems another contender has either caught the fancy of voters and surged to the top of polls or committed some blunder and plummeted like a rock falling off a cliff.

November 30, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed for Nov. 28, 2011

• We haven't been very impressed with the "Occupy" protestors at different sites across the United States -- most don't appear to have much of an idea of what they're protesting -- but unless there is something that doesn't meet the eye, police officers at the University of California-Davis used poor judgment in directing pepper spray at students who appear to be passively sitting on the ground. Further examination might provide new evidence warranting the officers' actions, but at first blush it appeared inexcusable.

November 28, 2011 | | Editorials


Another failure in Washington

Of all the nauseating things about the Super Committee's inability to reach a deficit-cutting deal, perhaps the worst is that the leaders of both parties have apparently spent months anticipating such an impasse and trying to lay groundwork to use the committee's failure to advance their own causes in the 2012 election. It proves once more -- how many times does this make? -- that most of the elected officials in Washington are interested not in advancing common-sense proposals but in trying to get re-elected and trying to make sure their own party dominates.

November 25, 2011 | | Editorials


A time of thanks

We live in troubled times. The United States is mired in the worst economic climate since the Great Depression, which has left thousands of Kershaw County residents with dire immediate circumstances and uncertain prospects for the future. Our military is fighting terrorism on many fronts, and the world in general has in many ways lost its respect -- and certainly its reverence -- for our country. Our federal government is strangled by political gridlock, and an overwhelming percentage of Americans say our elected officials aren't doing the job they were sent to Washington to do. Some people feel the moral and ...

November 23, 2011 | | Editorials


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Page 24 of 37

Articles by Section - Editorials


The Easter egg hunt mentality

Easter. Go ahead and let the word resonate in your mind. Let all the memories and fond associations come rushing over you. Easter is such a lovely holiday. The Biblical story behind it teaches people to be hopeful, that there is the possibility of redemption, unconditional love and eternal life. The natural season is a time of blooming and birth and renewal. The earth wakes up from its winter slumber and the air feels softer and warmer.

April 16, 2014 | Haley Atkinson | Editorials


Kudos to the UWKC

It was good to see dedicated volunteers and staff members recognized at last week's annual United Way of Kershaw County dinner. While there are many, many people who push together to make the United Way the superb organization that it is, a few special people were singled out for recognition. Dr. Frank Morgan, superintendent of the Kershaw County School District, received the Jake Watson Award, and Camden Deputy Fire Chief Phil Elliot was given the Anne Dallas Volunteer of the Year award. Other plaudits for volunteer efforts were given, and staff member Margaret Lawhorn was singled out for her ...

April 16, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Editorials


Noted and passed - April 14, 2014

• The news that the city of Camden plans to install an elevator at Camden City Hall is quite welcome. It is especially so to the city's disabled citizens who have found it difficult to come to court or attend Camden City Council meetings, both of which take place on the second floor. Many years ago, the city installed a chair-lift system attached to a railing of the building's main stairwell. It hasn't always worked and some people find its appearance a bit daunting. Installing the elevator -- which will also allow employees and visitors to reach offices and ...

April 14, 2014 | | Editorials


Medical marijuana

Both Democrats and Republicans in South Carolina will have advisory questions on their June primary ballots -- votes that will not be binding but are intended simply to provide some feeling for what Palmetto State residents are thinking about particular issues. As you would guess, such questions often revolve around issues particularly important to one party or another, and they're sometimes done to help provide leverage for the parties to push certain projects.

April 11, 2014 | | Editorials


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