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The CNG

We're glad to see that automakers in the United States are getting serious about producing vehicles that run on compressed natural gas (CNG), a fuel that is readily available in this country and much cheaper than gasoline. It's estimated that the U.S. has more than a 100-year supply of natural gas presently on hand, and prices have been falling, as opposed to the costs of gasoline. And, of course, running vehicles with a native fuel lessens dependence on the Middle East and its volatile politics. As we pointed out recently, we're enthusiastic about the fuel-efficient diesel-powered ...

May 23, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- May 21, 2012

• It's satisfying to see a future generation of leaders in training. Junior Leadership Kershaw County recently graduated its 24th class of youth, who completed a year-long program of team-building and leadership development activities. We congratulate the graduates of this year's Junior Leadership academy, which represents Camden, North Central and Lugoff-Elgin high schools and Camden Military Academy, and commend the Kershaw County Chamber of Commerce, Kershaw County School District and Camden Military Academy for their joint sponsorship of this program.

May 21, 2012 | | Editorials


Colson’s crusade

When Charles Colson, White House legal counsel under President Richard Nixon, went to prison in 1974 for obstruction of justice related to the Watergate scandal, few people could have predicted the path his life would take. Colson, in the vernacular of the day, got "jailhouse religion" and said he would dedicate his life to helping those behind bars. His conversion was met with a great deal of suspicion. Colson ended up surprising his critics by founding Prison Fellowship, an international evangelical Christian ministry, and spending the next 36 years working to spread his message in an attempt to help inmates ...

May 18, 2012 | | Editorials


The diesel option

We have noted before with a degree of perplexity that diesel automobiles that get great fuel mileage and are wildly popular in Europe have never been promoted here in the United States by automakers. Finally, we're glad to see that is changing, and the public is responding in a big way. Volkswagen is now aggressively pushing its Passat TDI diesel model, which can deliver up to 50 miles per gallon in highway driving. Auto industry analysts have said for more than three decades that Americans wouldn't latch onto diesels, partly because of the disastrous results back in the ...

May 16, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - May 14, 2012

• With the Major League Baseball season in its infancy, we're struck by one fact about the New York Yankees: the team must have the biggest -- we're talking in terms of physical size here -- pitching staff in the history of the league. Excluding Hiroki Kuroda, at 6-1 and 190 pounds the dwarf of the group, New York's starting rotation averages nearly 6-6 in height and 257 pounds. Hurler C. C. Sabathia is the biggest of the group at 6-7, 290. We don't know how well they'll pitch this year, but we doubt you'll see many ...

May 14, 2012 | | Editorials


Council v. Matthews

We don't know whether Kershaw County voters will face a referendum this fall on whether to organize a new county police department -- in the process taking virtually all authority away from the sheriff's office -- but the fact that county council is even considering it is a bit unsettling for both entities. Discord between sheriffs and county council members is nothing new, of course. In the past, going back decades, some sheriffs have been quick to remind council members that they are independent elected officials, and councils have been no less reticent to let sheriffs know they are dependent ...

May 09, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• There's a controversy over federal subsidies granted to college students, and that's a valid subject for debate, but lost in the shuffle is the fact that college costs are out of control. The expense charged to students from colleges and universities has skyrocketed in the two decades at a rate far exceeding the increase in the cost of living. Colleges need to get a handle on that before criticizing the government for not allowing large subsidies.

May 07, 2012 | | Editorials


Gasoline prices

It appears that claims of $5-a-gallon gasoline in South Carolina that were made a few months ago were nothing more than speculation, as the price of fuel is now coming down and is actually lower than it was a year ago. That's good news, of course, and experts say one reason is that people are driving less, using more fuel-efficient cars, making fewer trips and carpooling. There's another option we'd like to suggest, one that can save money while at the same time improving health. It's walking. What could be simpler than that?

May 04, 2012 | | Editorials


Team politics

The relationship between Gov. Nikki Haley and members of the General Assembly hasn't been exactly lovey-dovey, and there's probably some blame to be placed on both sides. But it does look a bit churlish for the Senate to finally pass a bill that will allow gubernatorial candidates to pick their own running mates, but to postpone the effective date of the bill until after Haley runs for re-election -- as she is presumed to want to do -- two years from now.

May 02, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- April 30, 2012

• USAirways, which has a major hub in Charlotte, is making a play for American Airlines, which is in bankruptcy, cutting a deal with American's unions that will give USAirways a step up in the merger it seeks. For Kershaw County travelers who choose to fly out of Charlotte rather than subject themselves to the restrictions of Columbia's limited flight schedules, that would be a great improvement, and we hope USAirways is able to pull its deal off.

April 30, 2012 | | Editorials


Football playoff

After years of fan discontent over the lack of a playoff system in college football, it appears that progress is finally being made toward establishing some sort of playoff that will involve at least four teams and possibly more. Over many seasons, since the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) was established, college football's power brokers steadfastly refused to admit that a controversial system of picking two teams to play for the national championship had any weaknesses. They wanted to protect the current bowl system and they displayed a blind eye to fans' calls for a playoff.

April 27, 2012 | | Editorials


End TERI

Members of the S. C. General Assembly appear poised to strike down the TERI program as the state's retirement system deficit continues to climb, recently hitting the $14 billion mark. The program was born out of good intentions but contained so many loopholes that it became the antithesis of what lawmakers intended when they started it.

April 25, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- April 23, 2012

• Political spin is a given these days, and President Obama is as good -- or bad, given your point of view -- at it as anyone. We were amused at his response to one reporter after Democratic strategist Hilary Rosen stuck her foot in her mouth with her comment about Ann Romney's never having "worked a day in her life." Obama referred to Rosen as "some woman on television," conveniently forgetting that she's a Democratic operative. We'll have to admit that goes beyond spin.

April 23, 2012 | | Editorials


Pat Summit: a coaching legend

Pat Summit, the legendary coach of the women's basketball team at the University of Tennessee, has stepped down, months after revealing that she has early-onset dementia. Summit carved out one of the most incredible records of any coach in any sport, finishing her career after 38 years with 1,098 wins and only 208 losses and more championships than anyone can count. We are all left to ponder one inescapable fact: if dementia can strike someone as young (59) and as active as Pat Summit, is there anyone who's immune?

April 20, 2012 | | Editorials


Civility

One of the great things about our political system is that citizens can openly and freely voice their opinions about elected officials and particular proposals that are under consideration. Such dialogue has been common in the controversy surrounding the proposed sports complex in Camden. Some critics have been vocal not only about the project itself but about the way Camden City Council has handled the matter. We understand many of those concerns; we've commented on prior occasions that council members could have done a better job of presenting their ideas and accepting public input. On the other hand, there ...

April 18, 2012 | | Editorials


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Page 25 of 42

Articles by Section - Editorials


Football brawl

What should have been a celebration of a sturdy football win by Camden High School (CHS) turned into an ugly incident Friday night at Zemp Stadium when a brawl occurred as players went through the handshake line following the game. The incident led to a significant amount of publicity across the state, causing a black eye to CHS and the city itself. While various investigations of the fight continue, including scrutiny by the Camden Police Department for possible criminal conduct, it appears the brawl was triggered by Dreher players.

October 22, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Oct. 20, 2014

• Thanks to I-20, two U.S. highways and several state highways, we have a lot of commercial vehicles passing through Kershaw County on a daily basis. While most of those vehicles are likely carrying goods for sale here and elsewhere across the country, there's also a good chance hazardous materials are being trucked through as well. So, it's a good thing Lugoff Fire-Rescue (LF-R) and the Kershaw County Fire Service have joined forces to create a Special Operations Team (SOT) to deal with any "HazMat" accidents that may occur. According to LF-R Battalion Chief Chris Spitzer, the team ...

October 20, 2014 | | Editorials


Alzheimer’s hope

Here in Kershaw County there are hundreds -- perhaps thousands -- of people suffering from Alzheimer's Disease, the cruel malady that attacks the brain. There are millions of Americans across the country who have fallen prey to Alzheimer's, yet research efforts to find a cure have been consistently disappointing over the last few decades. But two researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston have been successful in essentially growing Alzheimer's in a petri dish, and scientists hope that's going to be a breakthrough in studying possible new treatments for the disease.

October 17, 2014 | | Editorials


Sheheen still best choice for governor

For only the second time in its history, the Chronicle-Independent is endorsing a candidate for political office. And, as we did four years ago, we are, again, wholeheartedly endorsing State Sen. Vincent Sheheen for governor of South Carolina.

October 15, 2014 | | Editorials


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