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Christie doing job

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, the plain-spoken chief executive of the Garden State, found out following Hurricane Sandy just how deep partisan feelings can run. Christie, who praised President Obama for his response to New Jersey's being battered by the hurricane, came under severe criticism from many within his own party for being too complimentary of the president's actions; in fact, some laid the defeat of Mitt Romney at Christie's feet, which is a specious position to take. We'll acknowledge that Christie, who plays by his own rule book, might have been more effusive in his ...

November 23, 2012 | | Editorials


Colonial Cup

The folks at the Carolina Cup Racing Association did their usual fine job in putting on last Saturday's Colonial Cup steeplechase program, and those who attended saw fine weather and a great racing program that featured two Camden connections in the winner's circle. The Colonial Cup, of course, has never been as well attended or as well known as its older cousin, the Carolina Cup, and the annual November outing has sometimes battled iffy weather as well as all the competition -- football being the primary one -- that comes with a fall date.

November 21, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Nov. 19, 2012

• Every year seems to find a new "over-used" expression -- something that is uttered by one person and then is heard everywhere you turn. For this year's we've-heard-it-too-much saying, we're nominating "kicking the can down the road," which Washington politicians are using to describe a quick fix to the nation's deficit problems rather than a solid, long-term solution. We hope that in the future they resort less to catchy phrases and more to solving our problems.

November 19, 2012 | | Editorials


Campaign money

Every once in awhile we take to jousting at windmills, posing situations that we know will never become reality but advocating for them, nevertheless. This year's elections, and the massive amount of money spent on them, spur us to do a bit of windmill tilting today. We all know, of course, that President Obama and Mitt Romney spent billions of dollars during their presidential campaign, but over the years, other races have gotten more and more expensive. Those filter all the way down to the local level.

November 16, 2012 | | Editorials


Move forward

Tip O'Neill, the Massachusetts pol who was speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives for many years, once said that all politics is local. That maxim was never more evident than in last Tuesday's election for mayor in which political newcomer Tony Scully unseated incumbent Jeffrey Graham. It was concrete proof that if voters believe their elected officials aren't listening to them, they'll turn them out of office. Scully was a reluctant candidate but turned out to be an effective one, and voters responded to that.

November 14, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Nov. 12, 2012

• Former Camdenite and equine enthusiast Sally Brown is now living in Hilton Head with her husband, Austin, but her many friends here are happy that she has had a race horse named after her, just as Austin did a couple years ago. Hall of Fame trainer Jonathan Sheppard and his wife Cathy named a filly for her earlier this year, and that horse is now in training. We don't know of any other "couples horses" which have been named for people, and it's a fitting tribute to both of the Browns.

November 12, 2012 | | Editorials


Conciliation

The best thing about Election Day is that all the drivel spooned out by the pundits and analysts and strategists and partisans goes right out the window. The electorate finally gets to have its say. And on Tuesday, the nation's voters said they'd rather have another term of the Obama administration than put Mitt Romney in the White House. Strangely enough, Americans say they're tired of bickering among the two parties and they want compromise, but they re-elected both the president and the Republican-controlled House of Representatives, the two parties which haven't been able to agree ...

November 09, 2012 | | Editorials


The election

With election day now in the rear-view mirror, all Kershaw County residents from the staunchest, most bleeding-heart Democrat to the most rabid, reactionary Republican probably agree on one matter: that campaigns at every level last too long, are too expensive and focus too much on negative advertising. It won't be more than a few days before national pundits will begin speculating on which candidates are so-called front-runners for the 2016 election, and we'll be subjected to endless political chatter once again.

November 07, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Nov. 5, 2012

• With election day upon us, there's one final sad fact to report: lawyers for both parties are mobilizing, ready to start flinging lawsuits. In Ohio alone, thousands of attorneys are standing by; we're reminded a bit of those ads for prescription drugs in which a somber announcer tells viewers there's a pretty good chance they have a disease they might not even know about. Actually, having a legal fight would be an appropriate though mournful way to end what has probably been the most down-and-dirty fight American voters have seen.

November 05, 2012 | | Editorials


Vote

Hurricane Sandy proved once again that Mother Nature is always in charge. In fact, the number of natural tragedies in the last few years has been almost incalculable, emphasizing the point that man has little power when facing natural forces. Though nobody would have chosen it to happen because of a storm inflicting such cruel damage to so many people, it did focus publicity off the presidential race, and that was fortunate; the media coverage had become stifling.

November 02, 2012 | | Editorials


Deficit must be reduced

No matter which candidate wins the presidency and no matter which party controls the House and the Senate, elected officials would do well to pay attention to level-head business leaders when it comes to the horrid budget deficits this country is facing. Democrats decry any kind of spending cuts, while Republicans want to close the door on tax increases, period.

October 31, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Oct. 29, 2012

• In the midst of all the presidential punditry and endless spin, we were struck recently by the simple concept of how much sense it would make to have a single six-year term for the presidency, with re-election not allowed. Chief executives then could accomplish things without always stopping to check the political winds. Perhaps best of all, we would only be subjected to the endless campaign tripe every six years instead of every four.

October 29, 2012 | | Editorials


Statuary

As South Carolina's oldest inland city, Camden has a proud historical heritage and, fortunately, a populace that embraces it and promotes it. The latest chapter in the historical tableau was unveiled yesterday afternoon when statues of Joseph Kershaw, one of the founders of the town, and King Hagler a Native American leader who assisted the people of this area during the French and Indian War, were unveiled on the Town Green.

October 26, 2012 | | Editorials


McGovern

When former Sen. George McGovern died last week at age 90, there were probably many Kershaw County residents who might have remembered him only as the presidential candidate who got crushed in one of the largest landslides in history, winning only one state plus the District of Columbia against President Richard Nixon in 1972. McGovern's campaign was somewhat dysfunctional -- he fired his vice presidential running mate, Thomas Eagleton, after revelations that Eagleton had been treated for mental disorders -- and never had a chance against a president who was popular at the time and hadn't yet been trapped by ...

October 24, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and Passed

• Founded in 1933 during the Great Depression, Newsweek became a journalistic force of the 20th century; its weekly wrap-up of the news events affecting the world was required reading for those who wanted to be in the know. When the print woes that have affected the entire magazine industry, and much of the newspaper industry, became too severe, it switched to a sort of combination print-online publication. But last week, facing mounting losses, Newsweek gave up the ghost and cancelled its print edition. It's a sad occurrence, but a sign of the times in the magazine business.

October 22, 2012 | Glenn Tucker | Editorials


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Articles by Section - Editorials


Editorial: Medical marijuana

Though the legalization of medical marijuana appears to be a dead issue in this session of the General Assembly, we hope lawmakers won't forget about it and that there will be an attempt to revive the issue next year. It is, of course, an emotional matter for many people, and there are those who believe legalizing marijuana for medical purposes will be the first wave of massive use by people who are trying to skirt the law. Both the S.C. State Law Enforcement Division and S.C. Medical Association oppose the bill, with a former president of the ...

May 27, 2015 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - May 25, 2015

• We hope the community will join us in cheering on five Camden Military Academy (CMA) cadets who will travel in June to the University of Maryland to enter their National History Day performance piece into competition. The play is based on events from the 1950s and '60s surrounding the Civil Rights movement in Summerton, just an hour south of Camden. It's not just a matter of grabbing a few quotes off the internet and slapping together a script. The cadets, lead by CMA Dean of Students John Heflin, extensively researched the events leading to the landmark Briggs v. Elliott ...

May 25, 2015 | | Editorials


Editorial: Judge Kinard

Ernest Kinard, who died earlier this week, was made for the law. Possessed of a keen intellect and a probing curiosity, Kinard practiced law for 24 years in Camden before being elected a circuit court judge in 1988. He remained on the bench until his retirement in 2010, and in a "keep working" program for retired judges, he continued until recently. In all his years as a judge, he never missed a day of holding court, establishing a remarkable record of consistency and longevity. Kinard mentored a number of young attorneys who practiced with him or clerked for him over ...

May 22, 2015 | | Editorials


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