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Civility

One of the great things about our political system is that citizens can openly and freely voice their opinions about elected officials and particular proposals that are under consideration. Such dialogue has been common in the controversy surrounding the proposed sports complex in Camden. Some critics have been vocal not only about the project itself but about the way Camden City Council has handled the matter. We understand many of those concerns; we've commented on prior occasions that council members could have done a better job of presenting their ideas and accepting public input. On the other hand, there ...

April 18, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- April 6. 2012

• We're glad to read that analysts say the surge in gasoline prices is nearing its end and that prices might actually subside a bit as we head toward summer. Here in the United States, fuel prices have never been a classic supply-and-demand item, and there are few who truly understand the system. But one thing is indeed clear: if prices are going down, we're all going to have more money in our pockets to spend on other things and to help stimulate the recovery, and that's indeed a good thing.

April 16, 2012 | | Editorials


Romney’s road ahead

There's a long history in this country of major-party presidential candidates bending to the left (if they're Democrats) or to the right (Republicans) to win their parties' nominations, and then swinging back toward the center during the general election that determines who will occupy the White House for the next four years. That's probably what we're going to see now that Rick Santorum has given up his campaign, opening the door for Mitt Romney to become the Republican nominee.

April 13, 2012 | | Editorials


A news legend

Back in the early 1960s, the journalism surrounding politicians and famous figures was often adoring and non-controversial -- something a public relations expert might dream up. Movie stars and professional athletes were always pictured as happy and devoted to their families, although there was probably nearly as much fooling around back then as now. And political figures were smilingly looked upon as people who had nothing more than the good of the country in their hearts. President John F. Kennedy's multiple dalliances were well known but never reported.

April 11, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- April 6, 2012

• Everybody realizes that airline food isn't the best – even if you get anything at all to eat, which isn't often -- but a woman traveling on Qantas Airlines from Los Angeles to Melbourne, Australia, last week got the ultimate insult -- crawling maggots in a bag of trail mix distributed by a flight attendant. There's no word on whether she had to use her airline sickness bag after discovering the creatures mid-snack, but Qantas' offer to her -- $400 off her $1,600 ticket -- seems a bit chintzy.

April 09, 2012 | | Editorials


Voter ID

Politicians are known to exaggerate from time to time, and U.S. Rep. James Clyburn followed that tradition earlier this week when he said a South Carolina law requiring voters to show a picture ID when going to the polls hearkens back to the Jim Crow era, when all sorts of measures prevented blacks from going to the polls. Those days are gone forever, though they remained in force for too long, and the new law -- it's being challenged by the Obama administration's Justice Department -- poses no threat to trying to disenfranchise people. Rather, it's a safeguard ...

April 06, 2012 | | Editorials


CMA lawsuit

There are many people in Kershaw County who are no doubt shocked by the recent lawsuit filed against Camden Military Academy, in which the parents of a former cadet say he was not only hazed and beaten but sodomized and raped. Those allegations are yet to play out in a courtroom, but we would caution against a rush to judgment in this case. CMA has not been proven guilty of anything, and in the American system of jurisprudence, lawsuits can be filed in a fast and furious manner, usually with no penalty -- monetary or otherwise -- against the plaintiffs who file ...

April 04, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- April 2, 2012

• Camden and Kershaw County and, indeed, the state are fortunate to count Sibby Wood among their citizens. Raised in a family which fostered the arts, Wood has pursued a mission to provide access to the arts to all, with a particular focus on integrating arts into education. In May, the S.C. Governor's School of the Arts and Humanities will recognize Wood, who was instrumental in plans for the Greenville-based state residential school, with the presentation of the J. Verne Smith Leadership Award. Wood's support of the arts is well-known in the Camden community; this well-deserved honor embraces ...

April 02, 2012 | | Editorials


Supreme Court block opinions

The three days of oral arguments that took place in the U.S. Supreme Court this week regarding President Obama's health care plan provide an interesting look into what has happened over past years in the political world and how that has affected the judiciary. Over the last few administrations, presidents have gone further and further in appointing justices who hue to a particular political philosophy. It has become easy to predict the outcome of many of the landmark decisions that come before the court because a certain segment often votes together, in opposition to another segment which habitually ...

March 30, 2012 | | Editorials


Campaigns grind on

Rick Santorum took the Louisiana Republican presidential primary last week, but Mitt Romney grinds inexorably on, increasing his delegate count and making it more and more difficult for anyone else to become the GOP standard bearer. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich refuses to face the reality of defeat and stubbornly hangs on, and while there is a mathematical chance someone other than Romney could win, the odds are long.

March 28, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - March 26, 2012

• We notice that Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich has, as some used to say with regularity, "done gone to quoting the Bible" in his attempt to win the White House. Gingrich told a recent audience that Proverbs warns that "without vision, people will perish." Time has proven that people often try hard to prove things by using statistics and the Bible, both of which can be manipulated. We'd prefer he stay away from the scriptures when it comes to touting his own candidacy.

March 26, 2012 | | Editorials


Welcome, spring

If you've been sniffling and sneezing and wondering when the giant clouds of yellow pollen will finally subside, take heart: the worst of it is over, and those yellow cars you see driving around Kershaw County will soon be back to their natural colors. That will no doubt be a relief to many allergy sufferers here, and it will mean that everyone can finally celebrate, without reservation, the glory that is spring in South Carolina.

March 23, 2012 | | Editorials


S.C. ranks near bottom again

South Carolinians shouldn't be surprised to see the state rank poorly in yet another survey. It seems the Palmetto State is forever being relegated to the bottom tier in all kinds of indicators. Some of them, of course, don't have much validity. But the latest one, in which only five states are ranked lower than South Carolina in susceptibility to political corruption, is particularly unnerving because it's one that could be avoided with a modicum of care from legislators.

March 21, 2012 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - March 19, 2012

• One more sign of a changing digital world is the demise of the print edition of the Encyclopedia Brittanica, which will no longer publish a paper-and-ink version after 224 years. The World Wide Web, including online encyclopedia Wikipedia, made the Brittanica obsolete. It was considered the granddaddy of all American reference volumes, though its livelier cousin World Book, outsold it. Time waits for no man, and certainly not for Brittanica.

March 19, 2012 | | Editorials


Retaining records

It's good to see that Gov. Nikki Haley, who hasn't won a reputation for openness in her administration, has agreed to a plan which will result in better retention of records in the governor's office. Haley and the S. C. Department of Archives and History agreed to the plan, which is partly a result of The State newspaper's discovery a few months ago that e-mails and other records were being routinely destroyed.

March 16, 2012 | | Editorials


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Articles by Section - Editorials


Editorial: Thanksgiving

On Sept. 28, 1789, according to a government website, the First Federal Congress passed a resolution asking President George Washington recommend to the nation a day of thanksgiving. The site goes on to describe what happened: a few days later, Washington issued a proclamation naming Thursday, Nov. 26, 1789, as a "day of public thanksgiving" -- the first time the holiday was celebrated by our fledgling country.

November 26, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Nov. 24, 2014

• Property rights vs. community pride is a conflict as old as civilization itself. In recent months, we've reported on two attempts to regulate the appearance of properties in an effort to clean up our communities. Back in October, Kershaw County Council rejected, 3-4, third reading of an ordinance which would have given the county authority to demolish uninhabitable dwellings deemed a nuisance to neighbors or the community at large. More recently, Bethune Town Councilman John Fulmer proposed an ordinance which, if passed in December, would fine owners of blighted properties if they don't clean them up after being ...

November 24, 2014 | | Editorials


Obama’s ‘dart’ at GOP

Lawyers of every political persuasion are lining up in Washington to have their say on the legality or illegality of the plan President Obama intends to implement regarding amnesty for illegal aliens who are in the United States without proper authorization, with one major network saying the president's plan to take the immigration system into his own hands "is a daring test of the limits of presidential power."

November 21, 2014 | | Editorials


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