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Medicare

With the U.S. budget deficit still spiraling amid partisan stagnation and deadlock in Washington, two lawmakers, one a Republican and the other a Democrat, have finally come together to advance a proposal that would revamp the runaway costs of Medicare. Though solons in the nation's capital have refused thus far to address entitlement spending -- there's no way to bring the budget under control without changes to both Medicare and Social Security -- perhaps this is a ray of hope that there are some people in Washington who are willing to work together to salvage the fiscal integrity of ...

December 21, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- Dec. 19, 2011

• We observed last week that Republican candidates for president had no reason to subject themselves to a debate moderated by Donald Trump, who has continually threatened to run for the White House himself. They all apparently decided the same thing, and the debate has now been cancelled. Trump, meanwhile, says he's keeping his options open to mount a third-party presidential bid. If he does, we predict it will be met with the same lack of enthusiasm as his proposed debate.

December 19, 2011 | | Editorials


Public pensions

Public pensions have been much in the news since the economic downturn began, especially during the last year. The battle in Wisconsin over public employees' collective bargaining rights and pension plans has been the most publicized, but the same arguments have been occurring across the country. The South Carolina General Assembly has now taken the first step to deal with a $13-billion deficit in the state retirement pension fund, and though it involved difficult decisions on the part of a House subcommittee, it was the right thing to do. The recommendations still must go to the House Ways and Means ...

December 16, 2011 | | Editorials


Gingrich

Of all the presidential candidates, nobody was more a "dead man walking" than Newt Gingrich, the former U.S. House Speaker whose staff deserted him early in the campaign and who was left for dead by voters and the media. But he has been revived in the turbulent Republican race for the White House nomination and polls now show him leading his rivals in Iowa and South Carolina, and even in New Hampshire, where Mitt Romney is almost a neighbor. Ironically, it is Gingrich's ability to stand up and take the heat for his past conduct that is helping ...

December 14, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed for Dec. 12, 2011

• No matter how you feel about Tiger Woods -- it's a bit hard for us to pull for him given all the revelations about him -- one thing is clear: golf is more exciting with him. His win last Sunday at the Chevron Challenge, in which he birdied the final two holes to claim victory by a shot, was his first in two years. It'll be interesting to see how he does next year, and whether he can resume his chase of Jack Nicklaus' record number of victories in major championships, but as long as he's competitive there will ...

December 12, 2011 | Martin L. Cahn | Editorials


Changing opinion, not 'flip-flopping'

The term "flip-flop" has come to be one of the most caustic charges that can be thrown at a political candidate, and rightly so. It's hard to like a candidate who appears to bend his views to suit whichever audience he's addressing, and candidates who insist on taking one position one day and another the next day don't appear to be serious. But sometimes we as voters and political observers take this position to an extreme, pushing people into never changing their positions lest they be termed flip-floppers.

December 09, 2011 | | Editorials


Trump a liability

Decades ago, comedian/storyteller Will Rogers said of politics, "I don't belong to any organized party. I'm a Democrat." That same philosophy could be used to describe the decision of the Republican Party to let Donald Trump moderate a Dec. 27 debate among GOP White House hopefuls. Trump, who still says he's pondering a presidential run should none of the current crop of candidates exhibit the ability to defeat President Obama next November, has no business injecting himself in such a debate, but more importantly, the Republican Party has no business allowing him to do so.

December 07, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• Rep. Barney Frank has been one of the most unabashed liberals in Congress for more than 30 years, advocating all things left and marking business -- nearly any kind of business -- as the enemy of the people. Frank now says he won't run for another term, saying redistricting will put him at a disadvantage. The Massachusetts Democrat is well-known for his irascible nature, and during campaigns, his aides often tried to keep him away from voters, knowing he would offend them with his personality. The New York Times reported, "Those who admire him say Mr. Frank served up his sourness ...

December 05, 2011 | | Editorials


The cuts to come

Rep. Jim Clyburn of South Carolina, who was one of 12 members of the so-called Super Committee which recently failed to reach an agreement on deficit reduction, says he opposes the automatic spending cuts which are scheduled to occur because of the committee's failure. The automatic decreases in spending were intended as a sword over the committee's head to make sure the dozen members came together in compromise to do what was best for the country. They -- six Republicans and six Democrats -- didn't do that, and now Clyburn wants to change the rules.

December 02, 2011 | | Editorials


Cain and Gingrich

Voters in this country are notoriously fickle -- even more so than football fans, and evidence of that can be found in the up-and-down nature of regular polls conducted to see which Republican presidential candidate is doing best. Each week it seems another contender has either caught the fancy of voters and surged to the top of polls or committed some blunder and plummeted like a rock falling off a cliff.

November 30, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed for Nov. 28, 2011

• We haven't been very impressed with the "Occupy" protestors at different sites across the United States -- most don't appear to have much of an idea of what they're protesting -- but unless there is something that doesn't meet the eye, police officers at the University of California-Davis used poor judgment in directing pepper spray at students who appear to be passively sitting on the ground. Further examination might provide new evidence warranting the officers' actions, but at first blush it appeared inexcusable.

November 28, 2011 | | Editorials


Another failure in Washington

Of all the nauseating things about the Super Committee's inability to reach a deficit-cutting deal, perhaps the worst is that the leaders of both parties have apparently spent months anticipating such an impasse and trying to lay groundwork to use the committee's failure to advance their own causes in the 2012 election. It proves once more -- how many times does this make? -- that most of the elected officials in Washington are interested not in advancing common-sense proposals but in trying to get re-elected and trying to make sure their own party dominates.

November 25, 2011 | | Editorials


A time of thanks

We live in troubled times. The United States is mired in the worst economic climate since the Great Depression, which has left thousands of Kershaw County residents with dire immediate circumstances and uncertain prospects for the future. Our military is fighting terrorism on many fronts, and the world in general has in many ways lost its respect -- and certainly its reverence -- for our country. Our federal government is strangled by political gridlock, and an overwhelming percentage of Americans say our elected officials aren't doing the job they were sent to Washington to do. Some people feel the moral and ...

November 23, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- Nov. 21, 2011

• NBC is hiring former First Child Chelsea Clinton to do news projects. She will join Jenna Bush Hager, the daughter of ex-President George W. Bush, in doing work for the network, including the "Today" show. Looking at the kids of a former Democratic and Republican president, it strikes us that the duo might comprise the only semblance of political neutrality that left-leaning NBC has ever shown.

November 21, 2011 | | Editorials


Supreme Court and health care

As much as we would all like to believe that judges are not influenced in any way by politics, the real world just doesn't work that way. Those who sit on the bench can't help but be influenced by the philosophies they have developed over their entire lives. So with the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to hear arguments about the fate of President Obama's health care plan, we can all brace ourselves for a firestorm of rhetoric from pundits, commentators and strategists, many of whom will see a sinister plot in the entire episode. Compounding ...

November 16, 2011 | | Editorials


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Page 28 of 41

Articles by Section - Editorials


Kids and guns

Whenever the subject of guns is brought up, it engenders strong opinion on both sides -- from those who believe in absolute Second Amendment rights, and from those who believe that nobody should be allowed to own a gun in any circumstances. Like most people, we fall somewhere in the middle, solidly on the side of Americans to own firearms but a bit dubious about why it makes sense for people to own Uzis and other automatic weapons that are made with the express purpose of killing people.

August 29, 2014 | | Editorials


College football’s here

We comment on sports issues in this space on a regular basis, because athletics are so ingrained into the culture of Kershaw County and South Carolina. This week marks the kick-off of college football season in the Palmetto State, and several developments highlight the changing culture of the pigskin pastime here.

August 27, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Aug. 25, 2014

• Every now and then a story just makes you want to puff up with pride. We had one Wednesday, and we'll have another this Wednesday, both on the same subject: the renaming of the I-20 bridge over the Wateree River for Kershaw County's three medal of honor winners. Richmond Hobson Hilton, John C. Villepigue and Donald Leroy Truesdell are heroes out of history in no uncertain terms. In our preview story, readers learned that Hilton charged gunners firing at his squad, firing until his ammunition was spent, killing six enemies and capturing 10, but lost an arm as ...

August 25, 2014 | | Editorials


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