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Noted and passed

• We're glad to see that the U.S. Marine Corps has lifted its ban on bracelets which honor U.S. troops killed in combat. Top officials announced last week that Marines in uniform are now authorized to wear killed-in-action bracelets recognizing friends who have died in combat or from battlefield wounds. The change was made after an uproar from Marines when top officers recently began enforcing a ban on the bracelets. Marine brass widely decided the former rule was an outdated one and changed it.

October 24, 2011 | | Editorials


Texting ban

South Carolina is now one of 16 states which don't ban sending text messages while driving. In recent years, more and more states have prohibited the dangerous practice -- 13 since the beginning of last year. It's time for the Palmetto State to step forward and join what is a common-sense practice by banning texting while behind the wheel. Republicans who control the General Assembly will sometimes say they don't want to add any more government regulations, but a ban on texting makes just as much sense as a speed limit or a law to prevent passing on ...

October 21, 2011 | | Editorials


Anti-tax pledge regrets

As most Kershaw County residents realize, there's a huge fight going on in Washington over how to solve the immense budget deficits that are plaguing the country. Those on the far left seek large tax hikes -- that's no surprise -- while those on the far right want nothing but spending cuts. Lawmakers in the middle, who are more and more scarce these days, realize that there has to be some compromise if the country is going to thrive economically.

October 19, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed for Oct. 17, 2011

• If you don't think things change rapidly in the political world, you need look no further than Herman Cain, who was a mere blip on the Republican radar a few weeks ago and is now leading the polls. Only time will tell whether his star will fade, and there are many who criticize his "9-9-9" economic plan, advocating 9 percent income tax, 9 percent corporate tax and 9 percent sales tax. But one thing's for sure: the U. S. tax code is so burdensome and unwieldy that it needs a complete revamping. We wish other candidates would give ...

October 17, 2011 | | Editorials


Vanity plates

Years ago, when non-traditional license plates were first authorized in South Carolina, they were called "vanity plates" because many people who bought them put their initials on them. Since then, the specialty plate trend has grown to the point that the Palmetto State has more than 300 different varieties, ranging from NASCAR fans to Boykin Spaniel owners to Jimmy Buffett mavens. Law enforcement officers are finally starting to say enough is enough, the problem being that the plethora of plates is aborting the original mission of having them: to identify cars.

October 14, 2011 | | Editorials


Dog lawsuit

Camdenites of reason, including those who enjoy taking a walk in the morning, will no doubt find a great deal of wisdom in the a federal judge's burial of a lawsuit filed by two dog owners against city and county officials who had removed their dogs after complaints of violent behavior by the German Shepherds.

October 12, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• We couldn't help but be a bit wistful last week upon reading that DuPont is making a $500-million plant expansion at its Moncks Corner facility, which produces Kevlar. We recall fondly the glory days of DuPont in Kershaw County, when the May Plant had more than 4,000 people on the payroll in high-paying, steady jobs. The company, like most large corporations then, transferred many people frequently, which led to an influx and egress of talented, interesting people into and out of this area. Many have remained here in Camden even after DuPont sold its May Plant -- we're ...

October 10, 2011 | | Editorials


South Carolina GOP primary

South Carolina Republicans have long taken pride in the fact that the state's first-in-the-South primary has attracted a great deal of national political attention, and indeed, Palmetto State GOP voters have had an uncanny knack for picking the eventual party candidate. So it gives the state a great deal of clout among Republican candidates who want to gain momentum as they head into the election season's final year. As we've noted before, we aren't keen on the fact that candidates for the White House announce soon after a president has been chosen, setting up what is ...

October 07, 2011 | | Editorials


Legislative report cards

Surprise, surprise. Gov. Nikki Haley has handed out poor "report card" grades to Democratic legislators in Columbia, and they have responded by giving her a poor grade as chief executive of the Palmetto State. When Haley announced shortly after being elected that she planned to hand out grades to legislators, it sounded like a bad idea to us. First of all, it's arrogant. Second, it was reasonably easy to predict that members of her own party would get higher marks than Democrats. And third, it looked as if Haley had learned nothing from the contentious relationship that her predecessor ...

October 05, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed for Oct. 3, 2011

• We've commented all along that a pending bill to require South Carolina voters to present a photo ID at the polls was no big deal, though some opponents claimed it would be unfair because some people don't have ready access to such identification cards. The state has offered the estimated 178,000 Palmetto State residents without a card free transportation to a DMV center to have one made at no cost. Only 600 people have taken the state up on the offer, indicating to us that the rest don't have much interest in voting, anyway.

October 03, 2011 | | Editorials


Braves out

The many thousands of Atlanta Braves fans here in Kershaw County are no doubt hanging their heads in despair after the team blew a 10-and-a-half game wild-card lead in little more than a month to end up missing the National League playoffs. Ironically, the Boston Red Sox had a similar run of futility, failing to hang on to a nine-game wild-card lead they held Sept. 4. The Braves and the Red Sox share one common thread: they're both regional franchises, with Atlanta commanding huge hoards of fans in the South and the Red Sox the favorite of nearly every ...

September 30, 2011 | | Editorials


Pension plans

Gov. Nikki Haley says something needs to be done to alter a pension system that gives South Carolina legislators wider benefits than other state workers. The subject has become controversial following a report in USA Today last week detailing ways in which lawmakers' pensions are more advantageous than those afforded other state workers. The president of the S.C. Retirees Association has entered the fray, criticizing the practice and calling for reforms.

September 28, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• There are no doubt many Netflix users in Kershaw County; the video mail service grew over the years at an astonishing rate with its wide choice of flicks and excellent customer service. Then came a price increase that resulted in the loss of millions of customers, a move that CEO Reed Hastings recently acknowledged was "arrogant." The landscape is littered with companies that made brilliant moves, then followed them up with dunderheaded strategies that spelled death for them. It's too early to tell for Netflix.

September 26, 2011 | | Editorials


Romney/Perry: two-way race?

With the steady fade of Minnesota Congresswoman Michelle Bachman, the Republican nomination for president appears to be narrowing into a two-way race between former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Texas Gov. Rick Perry. That doesn't mean, of course, that things couldn't turn suddenly; four years ago, John McCain appeared dead in the water but mounted a strong comeback to win the nomination. But in this instance, it looks like it might be hand-to-hand combat between Romney and Perry, with the rest of the candidates left on the outside, looking in.

September 23, 2011 | | Editorials


Voter requirements

South Carolina recently passed a law that requires voters to show a photo ID when they go to the polls, and we have said all along those who object to such a move are throwing a red herring into the equation. There's certainly nothing wrong with having people prove who they say they are when they go to exercise the basic right of democracy, and the photo ID law does nothing to prevent people from voting or making it more difficult for them to do so.

September 21, 2011 | | Editorials


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Page 31 of 42

Articles by Section - Editorials


Power, divided

We've always believed the United States government works best when power is divided -- that is, with a president from one party and a Congress controlled by the opposite party. As of now, of course, we have a Democratic president and a split Congress, with the House of Representatives controlled by Republicans and the Senate dominated by Democrats. There are multiple forecasting models out there for the upcoming election, with most of them giving the GOP a better-than-even chance of gaining a majority in the Senate while retaining control of the House.

October 24, 2014 | | Editorials


Football brawl

What should have been a celebration of a sturdy football win by Camden High School (CHS) turned into an ugly incident Friday night at Zemp Stadium when a brawl occurred as players went through the handshake line following the game. The incident led to a significant amount of publicity across the state, causing a black eye to CHS and the city itself. While various investigations of the fight continue, including scrutiny by the Camden Police Department for possible criminal conduct, it appears the brawl was triggered by Dreher players.

October 22, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Oct. 20, 2014

• Thanks to I-20, two U.S. highways and several state highways, we have a lot of commercial vehicles passing through Kershaw County on a daily basis. While most of those vehicles are likely carrying goods for sale here and elsewhere across the country, there's also a good chance hazardous materials are being trucked through as well. So, it's a good thing Lugoff Fire-Rescue (LF-R) and the Kershaw County Fire Service have joined forces to create a Special Operations Team (SOT) to deal with any "HazMat" accidents that may occur. According to LF-R Battalion Chief Chris Spitzer, the team ...

October 20, 2014 | | Editorials


Alzheimer’s hope

Here in Kershaw County there are hundreds -- perhaps thousands -- of people suffering from Alzheimer's Disease, the cruel malady that attacks the brain. There are millions of Americans across the country who have fallen prey to Alzheimer's, yet research efforts to find a cure have been consistently disappointing over the last few decades. But two researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston have been successful in essentially growing Alzheimer's in a petri dish, and scientists hope that's going to be a breakthrough in studying possible new treatments for the disease.

October 17, 2014 | | Editorials


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