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USC appointment

We commented last week on the puzzling decision that Gov. Nikki Haley made in not re-appointing Darla Moore to the University of South Carolina Board of Trustees. We still aren't clear why Haley chose to pick a fight with Moore and so many university alumni who are grateful for the $70 million pledge Moore has made to USC. But Sen. Jake Knott's intention to pass a new law opening another seat on the board, and then to have Moore run for it, isn't the proper way for legislators to express their disapproval.

March 25, 2011 | | Editorials


Athletes and education

Even the most casual sports fan in Kershaw County can get caught up in the hoopla of March Madness, the NCAA basketball tournament that is arguably the best sporting event in the country. It's difficult to understand how college sports officials can continue to resist a football play-off system when you consider the interest drawn by the hoops tourney each year. And in this year's games, there have been lots of down-to-the-wire contests, generating more excitement than ever before.

March 23, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• Kershaw County residents have a special reason to pull for Wofford's basketball team, as the Terriers are coached by Mike Young, who's married to the former Margaret Green, daughter of Davis and Gege Green of Camden. Young led Wofford to their second consecutive NCAA tournament appearance this year after winning the Southern Conference championship, with the Terriers making the "Big Dance" field despite being one of the smallest schools in the country to play Division I basketball. In the first round, Wofford played BYU valiantly before falling; nevertheless, it was another great season for Wofford and we offer ...

March 21, 2011 | | Editorials


Ousting Moore

Say what you will about Gov. Nikki Haley, but don't say one thing: that she's bashful.

March 18, 2011 | | Editorials


Righting the wrongs

In a perfect world -- in a political system that functioned more as our forefathers intended rather than how it actually does -- elected officials in Washington would take on issues based on the importance of those matters rather than how the politicians would be affected at the ballot box in their next re-election campaign. But, of course, it's not a perfect world, and sometimes lawmakers can be most productive when they can plow ahead without having to worry about repercussions at the voting booth.

March 16, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• We see through news reports that a sizeable percentage of newly elected U.S. Congressmen have decided to sleep in their offices, partly due to the high cost of real estate in the Washington area. That brings back memories. Rep. Ken Holland, formerly of Camden, was one of the first to become an "office snoozer" when he was elected to Congress from the Fifth Congressional District in 1974. Holland, a lawyer by profession, served eight years before leaving Washington -- one of the few who didn't become intoxicated with the power of Washington -- and now lives in Gaffney

March 14, 2011 | | Editorials


Fine -- no points

The state appears on the verge of legitimizing a traffic ticket system that has existed on the gray market for years in many municipalities -- writing tickets and collecting fines while not counting the violations against people's traffic records, thus saving them the higher insurance premiums that often result with speeding violations. A bill in the House of Representatives would allow police to write a warning ticket to speeders who are going less than 10 miles per hour over the limit, with the state and cities sharing the revenue.

March 11, 2011 | | Editorials


A new life for Mather

We all like to think that when we go to the polls to elect our leaders that we're casting our ballots for people who will make bold decisions; few voters ever mark the box next to the name of a candidate they consider timid. Camden City Council has indeed made some bold decisions recently, the latest one being to buy the former Mather Academy property, with the purpose of building a new recreational complex to take the place of the aging Rhame Arena.

March 09, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• It's difficult not to like the candor of Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey, the plain-spoken chief executive who's grappling with the Garden State's problems in a way that residents of that state have seldom seen. Christie lets the criticism of the media and special-interest groups roll off his back while he pile drives into the massive issues facing his state. Recently, Christie said he was not running for president but added that he knew he could win if he did. Few politicians are so bold or, as his critics say, brash. It will be interesting to ...

March 07, 2011 | | Editorials


Frank Buckles

The nation marked a milestone earlier this week when Frank Buckles of West Virginia, the last surviving U.S. World War I veteran, died at the age of 110. Buckles passed away peacefully, according to his daughter, and remained until the end somewhat bemused by his singular status as last survivor.

March 04, 2011 | | Editorials


Public unions

The drama that's been playing out for a couple weeks in Wisconsin over public sector unions has moved to Ohio, and it's almost certain that the issue of public unions isn't going away. While union membership has been declining for years in private business, that hasn't been the case with public unions; in 2009, for the first time in this country's history, a majority of unionized workers were in government jobs rather than private ones. And the percentages are even more striking: while only 7 percent of private workers are unionized, 36 percent of government ...

March 02, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• We're glad to see Kershaw County Council moving toward a ban on smoking in county-owned vehicles. Employees have the right to smoke if they wish, of course, but the prohibition on puffing in vehicles merely extends the present policy which bans smoking in county buildings. Cigarette smoke odor lingers in vehicles, and non-smoking employees shouldn't have to put up with it.

February 28, 2011 | | Editorials


Is tax reform at hand?

With April 15 approaching, Kershaw County taxpayers are bundling their records together and preparing to report to Uncle Sam. In most cases, they'll be hiring someone to prepare their tax returns because the tax code in this country is so blindingly complicated that a layman has no chance of understanding it. Many tax professionals can't even understand it. But in Washington, there's finally talk of comprehensive tax reform. That, of course, doesn't mean our elected officials in the nation's capital will accomplish anything, but conditions are ripe. We have a Republican-controlled House and a Democratic-controlled ...

February 25, 2011 | | Editorials


Wisconsin unrest

Most people here in Kershaw County and across the country believe that despite political differences, there's a sense of fair play that should come into effect when philosophical problems arise in government. We certainly haven't seen much of an atmosphere of compromise in the last few years, but the brouhaha in Wisconsin over the governor's efforts to end a portion of public unions' collective bargaining rights has prompted two actions that we believe most people -- even those who don't agree with Gov. Scott Walker's plan -- will think violate a sense of fair play.

February 23, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• A simple but efficient system is helping prevent meth production in South Carolina. A computer tracking system that went online in early January monitors purchases of the cold remedy pseudoephedrine -- a key ingredient in meth -- as they are made and thus prevents lawbreakers from going from store to store to buy large supplies of the over-the-counter drug. Nearly 6,000 sales have been prevented in the month since the system went online; some of those certainly would have gone into meth. It's a good system that is apparently doing exactly what it was designed to accomplish.

February 21, 2011 | | Editorials


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Articles by Section - Editorials


Boston Strong

No city is more inextricably linked to this country's quest for freedom than Boston. From an early age students learn about the Boston Tea Party, the Boston Massacre and all the other historic events that helped set the colonies on the road to freedom. So it was especially fitting Monday that the city showed that it's indeed "Boston Strong" by completing its famous marathon. Of course, the race came a year after bombers killed three and wounded hundreds during the running of this country's most storied 26.2-mile race.

April 23, 2014 | | Editorials


Tax Time

With the April 15 tax filing deadline having past earlier this week, Kershaw County residents can breathe a sigh of relief – except for those who filed for an extension, of course. But a more important day, when it comes to your money, is Tax Freedom Day, which is the day the average South Carolina resident finally earns enough to pay his or her income tax bill. This year it was April 9; because of South Carolina's tax structure, which is lower than some states, Palmetto State residents pay their share earlier than the nation as a whole, which is ...

April 18, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Editorials


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