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Reggie Lloyd

Kershaw County resident Reggie Lloyd has had an impressive -- some would say meteoric -- career run in his public life. After practicing law for a prestigious Columbia law firm, he was elected a circuit court judge, and then he became U.S. Attorney for South Carolina, the first African-American to serve in that post since Reconstruction. In 2008 he was appointed by then-Gov. Mark Sanford to head the State Law Enforcement Division.

July 20, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- July 18, 2011

• The suit filed by former Kershaw County Sheriff Steve McCaskill against present Sheriff Jim Matthews is a messy situation that will cost county taxpayers money. Libel laws are written so that people who hold themselves up to scrutiny -- in other words, almost all elected officials -- have very difficult tasks in winning such suits; they must usually prove there is malice involved, which is difficult to do. At the same time, Matthews has certainly made uncomplimentary comments about McCaskill. This matter could end up being expensive and unpleasant for lots of people.

July 18, 2011 | | Editorials


Debt ceiling stalemate

Business leaders from across the United States -- ranging from Wall Street monarchs to small-town family business owners -- barraged Congress earlier this week with the same message that many Americans would like to send: quit arguing and get something done about the debt ceiling and then the long-term fiscal discipline of this country. News reports indicate that a concerted effort from business people across the spectrum was aimed at Washington -- ironically, much of it toward Republican lawmakers who have benefited from business contributions in the past.

July 15, 2011 | | Editorials


Betty Ford

Many Kershaw Countians who are past middle age undoubtedly recall with fondness former First Lady Betty Ford, who died last week at age 93. Her husband, Gerald Ford, became president upon Richard Nixon's resignation following the Watergate scandal; he had earlier been appointed to the vice presidency after Spiro Agnew resigned in disgrace.

July 13, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• President Obama has started tweeting, and he might regret it. The president is now using the social-media Twitter to send out messages, but Republicans aren't letting him get off unscathed, sending in questions about the economy's performance during his administration. The city of Camden has recently undergone its own social media upheaval with its (former) Facebook account, and folks there might advise the president that tweeting might not end up all that it's cracked up to be.

July 11, 2011 | | Editorials


Casey Anthony

Many Kershaw County residents are no doubt keeping in their minds the most-used cliché in legal circles: you can never predict what a jury's going to do. That certainly proved true again earlier this week, when 12 people found Casey Anthony not guilty of murdering her 2-year-old daughter. It was a case that had captured public opinion perhaps as no other had since the murder trial of O.J. Simpson many years ago. Both defendants were acquitted despite circumstantial evidence that seemed overwhelming. Both cases also spotlighted Americans' fascination with the legal system and with high-profile crime cases.

July 08, 2011 | | Editorials


Michelle Bachmann

Up until recently, someone who mentioned the words "woman" and "presidential candidate" in the same breath probably would have been met with the response, "Sarah Palin." But now, with Palin's star fading -- at least politically -- and with nobody having stepped forward to commandeer the frontrunner's role in the Republican field, Minnesota Congressman Michelle Bachmann is assuming a front-and-center position as a viable candidate to take the GOP nomination. Whether her early poll results will result in another shooting-star phenomenon is yet to be told, but Bachmann is proving herself a more adept campaigner than Palin was.

July 06, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• Spin is a way of life in Washington, but House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi carried it to new heights last week. When George Bush was president and Democrats controlled the House, she blamed everything in the world, maybe even including bad weather, on Bush. Now that Barack Obama is president and the economy is still struggling, she blames all the world's woes on Republicans, who have a majority in the house. "They hold the power," Pelosi says. Right.

July 04, 2011 | | Editorials


Gamecocks: No. 1 ... again

South Carolina baseball fans have plenty to crow about with the Gamecocks having won their second consecutive national championship, a feat that has been accomplished only a few times prior to this year. In the process, the team swept through the post-season playoffs without a loss, setting a record for consecutive playoff victories. The most exciting part was that USC was not a team that just lined up and mowed down the opposition without pausing; the Gamecocks got themselves into plenty of tight spots along the way and always managed to extricate themselves without major problems occurring. All championship teams ...

July 01, 2011 | | Editorials


Mystery medical shoppers

Officials at the Obama White House have been making calls to primary care doctors in this country, trying to make appointments in an effort to find out how difficult it is to do so if they're new patients. There's just one problem: those making the calls aren't identifying themselves and are basically "mystery shoppers" who are trying to ferret information from the doctors and trying to find out whether different answers are being given if they are paying privately or have public insurance such as Medicaid.

June 29, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• Young people have great resiliency, and we enjoyed a quotation from pro golfer Rory McIlroy after he ran away with the U.S. Open recently. Asked if his last-round collapse in the Masters tournament last spring was weighing heavily on his mind as he approached the final round in the Open, he replied, "Honestly, I don't know what all the fuss is about, because at the end of the day it's just a golf tournament and I'm 21." That's what we call keeping your perspective.

June 27, 2011 | | Editorials


Camden/Facebook

So-called social media sites on the Internet have proliferated in recent years, and such venues as Facebook are hugely popular with the under-40 crowd as well as many who are over that age. But such sites have their risks, too, as the city of Camden found out recently when it shut down its Facebook page after a number of people had posted comments -- some of them inappropriate -- criticizing the city's efforts to reach a joint accord with the Columbia YMCA for a new facility in Camden.

June 24, 2011 | | Editorials


Pledge of Allegiance and NBC

NBC's coverage of last weekend's U.S. Open golf championship was notable for two reasons. First, it showcased the masterful performance of Northern Ireland's Rory McIlroy, who established a new scoring record for the tournament and possibly signaled a "changing of the guard" from the Tiger Woods era (he didn't play because of an injury). Second, the network found itself with a controversy on its hands after it presented videos of American youngsters reciting the Pledge of Allegiance and either edited out or didn't include in the first place the words "under God" in the ...

June 23, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• We're glad to see that Pee Dee native Cale Yarborough has been voted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame. Yarborough and his hard-driving style helped popularize auto racing decades ago, and back in those days, when drivers were often former moonshine runners, he was also pretty good with his fists. His brouhaha with Bobby and Donnie Allison is still the stuff of legends. Yarborough, short in statue but tall in skill, is a deserving member of the Hall of Fame.

June 20, 2011 | | Editorials


Presidential contenders

There's one presidential political fact that's abundantly clear: most voters today favor "none of the above." Fewer than half of all Americans believe President Obama is doing a good job, but the field of contenders for the Republican nomination isn't exactly drawing rave reviews. Those observers who enjoy a good political free-for-all are no doubt watching that GOP race with interest, as there's already a host of hopefuls, and others are eying the race.

June 17, 2011 | | Editorials


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Page 34 of 42

Articles by Section - Editorials


Cancer screening

We wrote recently of a change in the way KershawHealth is managing its emergency department, sending seriously threatened patients to one area for immediate, vital care while directing others who are less ill to be treated in a non-emergency system. It's cost-effective, but also provides quality care for both types of patients.

October 31, 2014 | | Editorials


Express Care

One of the problems with the expense of health care is the fact that many people tend to use a hospital's emergency room as their primary care facility, going there with normal ailments such as flu and severe colds. Emergency room care is expensive -- too costly to be used in that way. KershawHealth is no different than other hospitals in that regard, and the decision to "split" the emergency department there is a sound one.

October 29, 2014 | | Editorials


Your vote, your choice

Today, the Chronicle-Independent begins a series of articles summarizing the candidates and issues that will be on the Nov. 4 ballot, one week from Tuesday. Perhaps the most contentious race isn't between candidates but between "yes" and "no" on two referenda offered by the Kershaw County School District.

October 27, 2014 | | Editorials


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