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A gift for Camden

With the city of Camden having such a distinguished historical heritage, and with so many residents acutely and proudly aware of that heritage and the value of keeping it alive, we are delighted to see the news that statues of Bernard Baruch and Larry Doby will be commissioned and will be placed on the grounds of the Camden Archives and Museum. The work comes through the generosity of Camden resident John Rainey, who's funding the statues, and sculptor Maria J. Kirby-Smith, who will perform the artwork. Those familiar with Kirby-Smith's exquisite sculpture at the Kershaw County Library will ...

April 13, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

Multiple sources are saying Katie Couric will leave her post as anchor of the "CBS Evening News," with the show mired in third place far behind rivals NBC and ABC. Couric was lured away from a long and successful tenure at NBC's "Today" show, and she is said to be eying a syndicated TV talk show. What works on a feature-type show such as "Today" doesn't always translate to success in the anchor chair. But we hope Couric finds success in whatever she does as she seems like a pleasant sort.

April 11, 2011 | | Editorials


A starting point

Rep. Paul Ryan has issued a plan for returning this country to fiscal sanity, and it includes cuts to Medicare and Medicaid. The Wisconsin lawmaker's proposal would slash about $5 trillion in spending over the next decade, making it by far the most intensive plan presented to date to try to deal with the country's unsustainable spending practices. But predictably, potential presidential candidates have had little to say, recognizing the political volatility of cutting entitlement programs that people have come to rely on. Some have praised Ryan for coming forward with a package and acknowledge that it could ...

April 08, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• Sen. Charles Schumer of New York, who never met a television camera he didn't like, didn't realize a microphone was turned on when he started dispensing advice to his Democratic colleagues on how to picture Republican policies as "extreme." Schumer's pointers give one indication of why everything is endlessly "spun" in Washington. Of course, it's not only Democrats who do this, as Republicans are just as guilty. But Schumer's the one who got caught; perhaps he'll check next time to make sure there's not a live microphone around.

April 04, 2011 | | Editorials


Carolina Cup

Many years ago, there was a Carolina Cup race director who insisted that every person in attendance was there to watch the horses run and that none of them were interested in the social aspects of the day -- or in taking a drink. That, of course, wasn't close to true, and there's a reason that the Cup has often been called the largest outdoor cocktail party in South Carolina. It is indeed a social occasion, and the consumption of alcoholic beverages has always played a part in its success. And yes, there always have been people who have ...

April 01, 2011 | | Editorials


Open government

The word "transparency" has become a popular one for politicians to use. After all, how many citizens are there here in Kershaw County -- or across South Carolina and the United States, for that matter -- who aren't in favor of a more open government? Not many. Indeed, transparency was one of the key platforms of Gov. Nikki Haley's campaign, and the issue no doubt contributed to her victory. A little squabble is now kicking up between her and State Treasurer Curtis Loftis over which is more committed to transparency and openness. Along with being amusing, it's also interesting.

March 30, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed -- March 28, 2011

• If ever a college coach deserved firing, it was Bruce Pearl, the Tennessee basketball head man who lied to NCAA investigators about recruiting violations he'd committed, and then committed additional illegal acts after denying he had done anything wrong in the first place. Pearl was a flamboyant coach who took the Volunteers to basketball heights they'd seldom attained, but his cheating was too flagrant to ignore.

March 28, 2011 | | Editorials


USC appointment

We commented last week on the puzzling decision that Gov. Nikki Haley made in not re-appointing Darla Moore to the University of South Carolina Board of Trustees. We still aren't clear why Haley chose to pick a fight with Moore and so many university alumni who are grateful for the $70 million pledge Moore has made to USC. But Sen. Jake Knott's intention to pass a new law opening another seat on the board, and then to have Moore run for it, isn't the proper way for legislators to express their disapproval.

March 25, 2011 | | Editorials


Athletes and education

Even the most casual sports fan in Kershaw County can get caught up in the hoopla of March Madness, the NCAA basketball tournament that is arguably the best sporting event in the country. It's difficult to understand how college sports officials can continue to resist a football play-off system when you consider the interest drawn by the hoops tourney each year. And in this year's games, there have been lots of down-to-the-wire contests, generating more excitement than ever before.

March 23, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• Kershaw County residents have a special reason to pull for Wofford's basketball team, as the Terriers are coached by Mike Young, who's married to the former Margaret Green, daughter of Davis and Gege Green of Camden. Young led Wofford to their second consecutive NCAA tournament appearance this year after winning the Southern Conference championship, with the Terriers making the "Big Dance" field despite being one of the smallest schools in the country to play Division I basketball. In the first round, Wofford played BYU valiantly before falling; nevertheless, it was another great season for Wofford and we offer ...

March 21, 2011 | | Editorials


Ousting Moore

Say what you will about Gov. Nikki Haley, but don't say one thing: that she's bashful.

March 18, 2011 | | Editorials


Righting the wrongs

In a perfect world -- in a political system that functioned more as our forefathers intended rather than how it actually does -- elected officials in Washington would take on issues based on the importance of those matters rather than how the politicians would be affected at the ballot box in their next re-election campaign. But, of course, it's not a perfect world, and sometimes lawmakers can be most productive when they can plow ahead without having to worry about repercussions at the voting booth.

March 16, 2011 | | Editorials


Noted and passed

• We see through news reports that a sizeable percentage of newly elected U.S. Congressmen have decided to sleep in their offices, partly due to the high cost of real estate in the Washington area. That brings back memories. Rep. Ken Holland, formerly of Camden, was one of the first to become an "office snoozer" when he was elected to Congress from the Fifth Congressional District in 1974. Holland, a lawyer by profession, served eight years before leaving Washington -- one of the few who didn't become intoxicated with the power of Washington -- and now lives in Gaffney

March 14, 2011 | | Editorials


Fine -- no points

The state appears on the verge of legitimizing a traffic ticket system that has existed on the gray market for years in many municipalities -- writing tickets and collecting fines while not counting the violations against people's traffic records, thus saving them the higher insurance premiums that often result with speeding violations. A bill in the House of Representatives would allow police to write a warning ticket to speeders who are going less than 10 miles per hour over the limit, with the state and cities sharing the revenue.

March 11, 2011 | | Editorials


A new life for Mather

We all like to think that when we go to the polls to elect our leaders that we're casting our ballots for people who will make bold decisions; few voters ever mark the box next to the name of a candidate they consider timid. Camden City Council has indeed made some bold decisions recently, the latest one being to buy the former Mather Academy property, with the purpose of building a new recreational complex to take the place of the aging Rhame Arena.

March 09, 2011 | | Editorials


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Articles by Section - Editorials


Noted and passed - July 21, 2014

• It looks like it's full steam ahead for KershawHealth and its strategic plan. In recent weeks, we have reported on the creation -- after several years of hard work -- of a general surgery division; the recruitment of a new orthopedic surgeon; the signing of an agreement with Orthopedic Advantage to create a top-level orthopedic center in Kershaw County; and an already established agreement with Team Health to transform KershawHealth's emergency department in order to fast-track non-emergent patients allowing staff to focus on those in true emergency situations. Dr. T. Chris Tran, the new orthopedic surgeon, joined Camden Bone & Joint ...

July 21, 2014 | | Editorials


Not so transparent

President Obama, who promised the most transparent administration in history, has delivered perhaps the least transparent. Following the trend of other recent presidents, Obama has kept a tight lid on the press, rarely interacting with reporters in a spontaneous fashion and instead relying on the spin of his White House press directors. And it has gotten worse the longer Obama has been in office; one report last week indicated that the administration was denying access on a variety of subjects with increasing regularity. The Associated Press reported, "In category after category -- except for reducing numbers of old requests and a ...

July 18, 2014 | | Editorials


Obama and race

Attorney General Eric Holder's recent statement that race plays a part in some Americans' opposition to President Obama's policies has stirred strong reaction from both liberals and conservatives, and reaction has highlighted the fact -- no surprise here -- that blacks and whites often look at issues of race differently. We suspect that Kershaw County would mirror the national opinions of a recent Gallup poll in which people were asked whether this country's criminal justice system is biased against blacks. More than two-thirds of whites said no, while about the same percentage of blacks said yes.

July 16, 2014 | | Editorials


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