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Fighting AIDS

The last couple weeks have brought astounding new developments in treatment of babies born with AIDS, raising for the first time the hope that perhaps a treatment has been found that will eradicate the disease in newborns who are born to mothers infected by the HIV virus. The first such case was reported last year, but there was skepticism among many in the scientific community. Earlier this week, a second similar case was reported. The first child, dubbed the "Mississippi baby," is now 3 years old and still virus-free; the second one shows no signs of HIV nine months after ...

March 07, 2014 | | Editorials


Reid’s hypocrisy

We aren't very keen on so-called super PACS, those political organizations which spend limitless money promoting one viewpoint or another. They buy huge blocks of television and radio time, along with newspaper ads, to launch attack ads against candidates, with much of the material in the ads questionable at best. Super PACS are a sad sign of what our political process has become.

March 05, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - March 3, 2014

• It was good, if still mixed, news from KershawHealth a week ago that January's financials looked a bit better than they have recently. The healthcare organization still posted a loss for the month -- as it has every month for some time now -- but only of $84,000. Compare that to $902,000 in losses for October 2013 alone and that is very good news. KershawHealth has a long way to go to combat a projected $32 million in operational losses by Fiscal Year 2018, less than five years away. However, last week's meeting also revealed that the KershawHealth ...

March 03, 2014 | | Editorials


Maxway and Broad

Representatives of Arnett Muldrow, the consulting firm hired by the city of Camden to provide marketing expertise, met recently with city council to discuss their recommendations. Of their proposals, we found one especially noteworthy but found another worthy of deeper study by council.

February 28, 2014 | | Editorials


Social Security

Last year President Obama approved a budget plan that would change the way Social Security increases are calculated, moving them from a process determined by the consumer price index to one set by a process known as chained consumer price index. That was encouraging to the millions of Americans who are concerned about the runaway spending problems that are threatening the nation's economy. Many economists favor the chained concept as being a more accurate way to measure the rate of inflation.

February 26, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Feb. 24, 2014

• We commented just last week on the wise decision by Volkswagen workers in Tennessee to turn down unionization with the UAW. But Gov. Nikki Haley's statement that unionized plants aren't welcome at all in South Carolina is off the mark. Sen. Vincent Sheheen of Camden, who's running against Haley, said South Carolina should remain a right-to-work state, where workers have the right to decide whether to join unions. That's a more reasonable position.

February 24, 2014 | | Editorials


UAW defeat

The recent union defeat at a Tennessee Volkswagen plant is yet another sign that the United Auto Workers, once an indomitable force in this country, is merely a shell of its former shelf. Where the American economy is concerned, that's a good thing. Employees at the Chattanooga plant turned thumbs down on the union despite a protracted lobbying effort by UAW officials; in fact, Volkswagen itself had been in favor of the union and had allowed organizers nearly unlimited access to its plant while denying that same right to opponents.

February 21, 2014 | | Editorials


The storm

Last week's forecasts of an "epic winter storm" in the South had everyone in Kershaw County scurrying around trying to get prepared. Of course, it's an old joke that if a few flakes of snow are forecast, Southerners flood grocery stores to stock up with milk and bread -- we've never quite understood why milk and bread -- and supermarkets in this area were indeed beehives of activity early last week as people prepared for possible power outages and periods of being homebound.

February 19, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Feb. 17, 2014

• We note with sadness the recent death of Bill Few of Liberty Hill, one of the great high school football coaches in this state. Few, who attended Clemson on an athletic scholarship, was a no-nonsense coach who instilled discipline in his players and compiled, over his 26-year career, a 221-68-3 record, including three state championships. His last few years on the field were spent at North Central High School.

February 17, 2014 | | Editorials


FCC proposal

As a news organization, we at the Chronicle-Independent tend to pay more attention to First Amendment issues than most people, and a new proposal by the Federal Communications Commission threatens to let the government decide what news stories television stations can broadcast. We realize, of course, that many cable stations today lean one way or the other; you need look no further than the two most commonly cited ones, FOX News and MSNBC, both of which might purport to deliver straight-up news but seldom do. But the great thing is that people can tune in to whatever news outlet they ...

February 15, 2014 | | Editorials


GOP moderates

Convinced that hard-right policies won't help the party regain the U.S. Senate in this year's mid-term elections, mainstream Republicans are doing everything they can to help moderate candidates who are facing challenges from Tea Party hopefuls and others who hew to hard-right policies. Many say the core principles of the Tea Party -- smaller government and lower taxes -- have been hijacked by candidates who espouse a social agenda that's not acceptable to average Americans. And they want to stop those candidates.

February 12, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Feb. 10 , 2014

• With the Wichita State Shockers headed into last weekend unbeaten, there are probably a significant number of people in the Palmetto State dismayed by the fact that the South Carolina Gamecocks didn't go after coach Gregg Marshall when he was at Winthrop. USC turned thumbs down on Marshall on a couple occasions, but it's looking now as if hiring him would have been a smart move.

February 10, 2014 | | Editorials


Good Samaritans

A bill currently before the S.C. General Assembly would provide immunity from lawsuits to medical personnel who are treating people for free. It's an extension of the state's Good Samaritan statute, which protects doctors who stop to help accident victims, and it makes perfect sense. Good Samaritan laws have been passed all over the country, and they allow physicians to provide services at accident scenes without having to worry about being sued for malpractice.

February 07, 2014 | | Editorials


Car sensors

Automakers across the United States and around the world have come up in recent years with innumerable new features -- "bells and whistles" is the popular name for them -- which entice buyers and make driving more pleasurable and convenient. Heated seats and steering wheels are great for those cold mornings; keyless remote entry devices make keys almost obsolete; and navigation systems take the guesswork out of getting to an unknown location.

February 05, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and Passed

** Pete Seeger, who died recently at 94, had a profound influence on the American musical scene; the folksinger-songwriter was a catalyst for the folk music revival of the 1960s and he penned some of the great songs of that genre, including If I Had A Hammer, Where Have All The Flowers Gone and Turn, Turn, Turn. He also helped champion social change and was a consistent anti-war voice. Few people in the music world accomplished as much as he did, and he will be missed.

February 03, 2014 | Glenn Tucker | Editorials


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Page 8 of 43

Articles by Section - Editorials


Obama’s ‘dart’ at GOP

Lawyers of every political persuasion are lining up in Washington to have their say on the legality or illegality of the plan President Obama intends to implement regarding amnesty for illegal aliens who are in the United States without proper authorization, with one major network saying the president's plan to take the immigration system into his own hands "is a daring test of the limits of presidential power."

November 21, 2014 | | Editorials


Transparency

Operating under the simple premise that citizens have a right to know as much as they can about how their government officials operate, and how that affects governmental agencies as a whole, we almost always favor laws and regulations which require transparency in government. Transparency, of course, is an overused word, but it basically means that government agencies must operate in a way that allows citizens to observe what's happening, and even to have input about what's taking place.

November 19, 2014 | | Editorials


Noted and passed - Nov. 17, 2014

• Once again, we mention the good work of Brian Mayes in this space. Seven years ago -- in response to the death of Camden High School student Michael Smith in Kershaw County's only gang-related shooting -- Mayes said the community had to become "a better gang than the gangs." What he meant is Camden and Kershaw County had to offer young people alternatives to gang life and choices which could land them in jail, or worse. Two events this month prove Mayes has planted good seeds we hope will bear fruit for generations to come. First, the official ribbon cutting ceremony ...

November 17, 2014 | | Editorials


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