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An Israeli cafe hopes 50% discounts on hummus will unite Arabs and Jews
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The Hummus Bar is offering Arabs and Jews who eat together a 50 percent discount, owner Kobi Tzafrir posted on Facebook. - photo by Payton Davis
Violence between Arabs and Jews in Israel has increased recently but one restaurant is hoping a hummus-heavy proposition can make the two groups unite, according to Quartz.

Hummus Bar owner Kobi Tzafrir announced on Facebook a "50 percent discount on hummus to a table where Arabs and Jews sit together," Svati Kirsten Narula wrote for Quartz.

Things seem meek, but if anything can bring people together, "it's hummus," Narula quoted Tzafrir as saying.

Hilary Hanson wrote for The Huffington Post that Tzafrir's Facebook post, translated from Hebrew, stated how he hopes tasty food can help in the long run.

"Scared of Arabs? Scared of Jews? With us there are no Arabs! But also no Jews ... With us, there are only human beings," Hanson quoted Tzafrir's post as saying. "And real, wonderful Arab hummus! And great Jewish falafel! And free refills on all hummus dishes if you're Arab, Jewish, Christian, Indian, et cetera ... Special discount: 50 percent off on hummus dishes for a table where Jews and Arabs are sitting together!"

And Benjamin Snyder reported for Fortune that "several tables of both Arabs and Jews" have taken Tzafrir up on his offer.

According to Snyder, a variety of diners from the different groups have consistently eaten at Hummus Bar since Tzafrir's ad went viral Oct. 13. The Facebook post also allowed the restaurant's owner to garner feedback as far away as Japan about his idea.

Yaron Steinbuch of New York Post noted another interesting result: Some Arab and Jewish patrons have turned down the discount just to support Tzafrir's initiative.

A lot of customers now say they have seen the post and they tell me theyve come to support the idea, Steinbuch quoted Tzafrir saying. Some Arabs come with Jewish friends, some Jewish families come alone. Theyre all saying good things.

Tzafrir told NBC News Israeli-Palestinian violence is common in the region, but a recent spike in conflict made him "uncomfortable."

At least eight Israelis have been killed by Palestinians in "near-daily" attacks over the last four weeks, NBC News reported. More than 40 Palestinians died by Israeli fire in the same time.

"I always had Arab clients and Arab workers that are very nice, and when the last round of violence started, I felt very uncomfortable," Tzafrir told NBC News. "The situation is absurd and I thought that I can bring a smile to people's faces."