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Photographer: Cell phones at weddings are out of control
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Frustrated with wedding attendees keeping phones out constantly during the ceremony, photographer Thomas Stewart posted a picture on Facebook with a rant suggesting phones be banned at weddings. - photo by Payton Davis
Photographer Thomas Stewart captures the once-in-a-lifetime moments during weddings brides and grooms won't want to forget.

But he sees a problem: Clutching cameras and phones, loved ones at ceremonies try to do the exact same thing, even blocking happy couples' views of each other. Rhianna Schmunk wrote for The Huffington Post that Stewart took to Facebook to sum up his frustrations, offer solutions and show Facebook users the dilemma with one photo as an example.

"Look at this photo," Stewart's post, which has garnered more than 65,000 shares since Thursday, read. "The groom had to lean out past the aisle to just see his bride approaching. Why? Because guests with their phones were in the aisle and in his way."

Stewart might be a bit biased not wanting "amateurs" in his way on the job but his post brings up some valid points, Brian Koerber wrote for Mashable. The pictures captured on phones are typically sub par; in addition, attendees snapping photos get in the way of weddings.

So what did Stewart propose brides and grooms do?

They should consider an unplugged wedding, according to Mashable.

"In your invites, tell everyone you're having an unplugged ceremony: no technology, please," Stewart's post stated. "Write it on a chalkboard which guests can see as they arrive on the day. Tell your celebrant / minister / priest to tell the guests at the start of the ceremony."

Facebook users agreed weddings sans phones have benefits.

"I went to an unplugged wedding earlier this year," one Facebook user commented on the post. "It was awesome! They also added that if any guest wanted to see their professional photos, they would happily provide them with a CD! An awesome add on. (N)o excuses for snapping guests then."

Weddings aren't the only events Americans don't want phones out at, Lucy Shouten noted for The Christian Science Monitor: A recent Pew Research study indicated 88 percent say they prefer phones out of sight at family dinners. An even higher percentage prefers no technology in theaters or churches.