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Teaching kids how to do chores boosts work ethic and empathy, study finds
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According to a recent study, when children do chores they learn to be more empathetic, they better understand the importance of contributing to family and are well-adjusted. But it isn't just about telling kids to do chores it's teaching them how. - photo by Mandy Morgan
When children do chores they learn to be more empathetic, they learn the importance of contributing to family and are well-adjusted, according to a recent study.

But it isn't just about telling kids to do chores it's teaching them how.

Marty Rossman of the University of Mississippi looked at data collected over 25 years to see if asking children to do chores in the home predicted their success in later years, according to an Associated Press report in The Washington Times.

"Chores, she determined, instilled in children the importance of contributing to their families and gave them a sense of empathy as adults," wrote the Times' Kimberly Dishongh. "Those who had done chores as young children were more likely to be well-adjusted, have better relationships with friends and family and be more successful in their careers."

However, simply asking kids to do chores doesn't mean they will learn anything, let alone how to properly clean, if they aren't shown. It's about telling and showing.

"One thing that parents don't spend enough time on is really being specific about exactly what the chore entails and even demonstrating how to do it and how to do it properly," said Nicholas Long, director for the Center for Effective Parenting at Arkansas Children's Hospital, wrote Dishongh.

Even though having children do chores around the house can reap significant benefits, another study recently found that fewer parents in the U.S. are asking their children for household help.

Out of 1,001 adults surveyed in the U.S. by Braun Research, 82 percent reported having regular chores and duties while growing up, but only 28 percent said that they require the same of their children, reported The Wall Street Journal.

The study that was released in 2014 found that parents didn't want to add more to the list of things kids were involved in, causing academics and extra curriculars to become more of a burden.

"Parents today want their kids spending time on things that can bring them success, but ironically, we've stopped doing one thing that's actually been a proven predictor of success and that's household chores," said Richard Rende, a developmental psychologist, according to the Journal.