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The one thing wealthy families have in common will surprise you
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As income increases, the percentage of families with any parents staying at home falls off and the number of families with two incomes skyrockets, the data shows. - photo by Shelby Slade
While more dads may be staying at home with their children, perhaps the biggest reason for the trend might be tied to income.

At lower income levels, both parents are significantly less likely to work, and both mothers and fathers are more likely to stay at home with their children, Quoctrung Bui reported for NPR.

At the $17,000 to $25,000 income level, 60 percent of mothers stay at home. However, this income level is more likely to have only mothers working, with 27 percent of dads staying at home.

As income increases, the percentage of families with any parents staying at home falls off and the number of families with two incomes skyrockets, the data shows.

High-income families are much more likely than average to have both spouses working full time, Bui wrote. The message is pretty clear: It's pretty hard to be rich with only one income.

Historically, women were more likely to stay at home, but in recent years the number of dual-income families have grown and hit a plateau, according to NPR.

The picture isn't likely to change much unless men take on a larger share of child-care duties or women get more access to things like parental leave and flexible work schedules, which make it easier for women to work full time, Bui wrote.

See more about how income affects working parents by checking out this graph.